East Atlanta Charter School - DeKalb County Schools

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East Atlanta Charter School Petition Table of Contents

I. THE

CASE ................................................................................................................. 3

II. ACADEMIC

OBJECTIVES, PLANS, AND WAIVERS .............................................11

III. ORGA

NIZATIONAL OBJECTIVES, PLANS, AND WAIVERS .............................. 41

IV. GOVER

NANCE ....................................................................................................... 56

V.

CONTRACTS WITH EDUCATIONAL SERVICE PROVIDERS OR OTHER CHARTER PARTNERS ........................................................................................... 69

VI. FINA VII. STUDE

NCIAL OBJECTIVES, PLANS, AND WAIVERS ........................................... 72 NT ADMISSIONS ....................................................................................... 76

VIII. FACI LITIES .............................................................................................................84 IX. STUDE X. OTHE

NT DISCIPLINE .........................................................................................88 R INFORMATION ........................................................................................89

East Atlanta Charter School Petition Appendix Table of Contents Tab Number

Document Name

Page Number

1

Georgia Department of Education Immersion Information

Appendix-001

2

DeKalb County School District Immersion Information

Appendix-010

3

Information about use of Spanish in the United States

Appendix-012

4

Letter of support from expert bilingual professor and author Dr. Rebecca Callahan, together with her article and her C.V.

Appendix-014

5

Summary of the research of the benefits of immersion language education

Appendix-029

6

Sample metropolitan Atlanta jobs that prefer or require Spanish proficiency

Appendix-053

7

Evidence of community support for East Atlanta Charter School: change.org petition results, including comments

Appendix-114

8

Letter of partnership from Georgia State University’s Center for Urban Language Teaching and Research (CULTR), together with information about CULTR and C.V.s of the three Directors.

Appendix-136

9

Spanish Language Arts Common Core standards

Appendix-153

10

Full Curriculum with Alignment to Georgia Performance Standards

Appendix-224

11

Curriculum-based measures

Appendix-285

12

Information about proposed instructional materials

Appendix-340

13

American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages Performance Descriptors for Language Learners

Appendix-363

14

Job descriptions

Appendix-381

15

Organizational charts

Appendix-394

16

Governing board bylaws and election of officers

Appendix-399

17

Resumes of founding board members

Appendix-414

18

Certification of Incorporation

Appendix-436

19

Board questionnaires/Conflict of Interest forms

Appendix-437

20

Code of Ethics

Appendix-452

21

Letters of Support for the petition from institutions and businesses: Atlanta International School The Language Garden The State Bar of Georgia Nead Werx Locke Law Firm LLC Project Locker Red Tile Roof Studio WonderHealth, LLC

Appendix-458

22

Monthly cash flow projections for first two years of operation (with revenue and expenditures), at full enrollment and at projected enrollment and start-up and five-year operating budgets

Appendix-466

23

Information about the McNair Cluster of schools

Appendix-467

24

Proposed enrollment application

Appendix-485

25

Proposed annual calendar (EACS will follow DCSD’s calendar)

Appendix-487

26

Proposed daily schedule

Appendix-488

27

Facilities plans

Appendix-494

28

Emergency safety plan outline

Appendix-516

29

Family handbook, including student dress code

Appendix-519

30

Insurance/indemnification information

Appendix-535

31

Eligible school checklist

Appendix-548

32

Signed letter of assurances

Appendix-549

East Atlanta Charter School Petition   

Executive Summary Charter School Name: East Atlanta Charter School Check one:

_X_ New Start-Up ___ Start-up renewal ___ College & Career Academy

___ New Conversion ___ Conversion Renewal

If renewal, when was the original charter term start date? N/A If renewal, for how many charter terms has the school been in existence? N/A Name of the Georgia nonprofit corporation that will hold the charter, if granted: _East Atlanta Charter School Foundation______________________________ Contact person:

Loren Locke, Chair of the Board of Directors

Contact address: Telephone number of contact: E-mail address of contact: Grade Levels Served: __Kindergarten – 5th_______________________ Ages Served: __5-11______________________________ Proposed Opening/Renewal Date: __August 2016____________ Proposed Charter Term: ___5 years___________________ During the first charter term we propose to serve students as follows: Year/Grade 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021

K 88 88 88 88 88

1 88 88 88 88 88

2 3 4 0000 88 0 0 0 88 88 0 88 88 88 88 88 88

5 0 0 88

Total 176 264 352 440 528

i.

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I.

THE CASE

1. Why do you want a charter? a. What is your motivation for applying to be a charter school? The vision of East Atlanta Charter School (“EACS”) is to create an exceptional educational experience for elementary students that will foster each child’s curiosity, confidence, creativity, and communication skills in two languages. Our student body will reflect and embrace our community’s racial, ethnic, cultural, and socioeconomic diversity. Our teachers will cultivate confident, bilingual learners who can think critically and creatively, express themselves elegantly in writing and in speech, solve complex problems, and work collaboratively. b. What will you be able to do with a charter that you cannot do without a charter? No other public school in DeKalb County has a whole-school dual language immersion program, and no other school follows Common Core language arts standards in the second language. At East Atlanta Charter School, every child will learn Spanish. Having every student and classroom working toward the same goal of advanced Spanish proficiency will foster extensive opportunities to reinforce and expand on each individual class’s lessons, and more time to provide both structured and unstructured opportunities for each student to communicate in Spanish. Further, a school-wide dual immersion program creates a unity of purpose across the faculty and staff that will result in increased achievement of the student body across all subject areas. At East Atlanta Charter School, our goal is to educate students to be truly at ease beyond their borders. Second language instruction is integral to achieving this goal. Guided by the most current research on language acquisition and evidence showing the significant social and cognitive benefits of learning a second language, we have created a Spanish immersion curriculum designed to educate students who can converse comfortably on subjects ranging from the everyday to the academic, with a focus on global awareness. At East Atlanta Charter School, all students will spend 50 percent of their time learning in English and 50 percent learning in Spanish. All content subjects (language arts, math, social studies, and science) will be taught in both English and Spanish. In addition to the social and personal benefits of bilingualism, current research shows that second language acquisition is highly beneficial to the development of brain functions and cognitive skills. Our coordinated curriculum in both English and Spanish leads to a high level of academic rigor and an opportunity for interdisciplinary learning that is engaging and meaningful. EACS will hire teachers who are extremely well qualified, with extensive training in subject content and in second language instruction. English and Spanish teachers will collaborate to create and nurture the social, emotional and academic growth of their students. Partner teachers will share the responsibility for teaching the content and curriculum and will communicate with each other daily about student progress and concerns. Spanish teachers will use Spanish 100 percent of the time for both instructional and procedural interactions, providing all students with sufficient input for consistent incremental assimilation of the language. Through formal and informal assessments, teachers will monitor students’

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progress and offer opportunities to strengthen their language skills through dynamic and differentiated groupings. Dual language immersion will not produce functionally bilingual students if they are not given enough opportunity and impetus to produce coherent, accurate, and sociolinguistically appropriate speech and writing. A dual language immersion program that provides inadequate opportunity for expressive language produces children who can listen or read in Spanish extremely well, but who are nonetheless “passive bilinguals” lacking the confidence and skill to speak and write in their second language. Because of the freedoms allowed by the charter, East Atlanta Charter School will cultivate the precise environment needed to maximize the success of the students. Our entire educational model is designed to foster each child’s curiosity, confidence, creativity, and communication skills. Pursuing these goals for each child is completely intrinsic and inseparable from our whole-school dual language immersion program. c. Describe how parents, community members, and other interested parties were involved in developing the petition and will be involved with the school. i.

Describe in detail the community support for this school and the need for this particular school in the community it will serve. Support may be evidenced through additional documentation.

When the plan to create East Atlanta Charter School was first widely announced, the community response was immediate and enthusiastic. An online petition of support garnered 100 signatures in the first 24 hours and exceeded 500 signatures within the first month. Similarly, East Atlanta Charter School launched a Facebook page that as of early May, 2015 had received 155 “likes” and continues to be an active hub of DeKalb County parents. Our website, www.EastAtlantaCharterSchool.com, continues to draw dozens of unique visitors per day. Our supporters are passionate and vocal, citing myriad reasons that they would be eager to enroll their own children in East Atlanta Charter School. We have held well-attended public meetings at the Gresham Park public library and by invitation at local homeowners’ association events and neighborhood meetings hosted by members of the Friends of South DeKalb Schools group. According to our supporters, the need for East Atlanta Charter School is clear: -

“We would love to support a charter school in our neighborhood. We've been residents of East Atlanta since 2003, and we've just added a child to our family this year. Our wonderfully diverse area needs a school as unique and special as its residents. We have a lot to share and are eager to learn.” – M. Rose of Atlanta.

-

“Every child deserves a good, local, tuition-free school option, and there currently isn't one. A charter school would be good for everyone in the area and would keep some families with school-age children, including mine, from moving to another school district.” – A. Blackstock of Atlanta.

-

“Our daughters are currently in a Spanish immersion preschool in East Atlanta where we live. We would love to send them to a dual language charter in the area for K-5.” – N. Talero of Atlanta.

-

“There should be no such thing as a "bad" school in any neighborhood. Here's a great opportunity to begin to correct our educational shortcomings, to invest in our neighborhood, our children and America’s future.” – M. Rials of Atlanta. 4

East Atlanta Charter School Petition   

-

“I believe in multilingual education and would like more options for my children closer to where we live.” – L. Campbell of Atlanta.

-

“I need to be sure that my children are able to get the best possible education while remaining in DeKalb County.” – Natalie Fernandez of Atlanta. ii.

As part of your evidence of community engagement, you must provide a letter or a petition signed by parents/guardians of school-age children eligible to attend the charter that demonstrates that they would consider enrolling their child in the proposed school. These items may be placed in the Appendix.

Please see Exhibit 7. iii.

Describe the steps you have taken to develop any partnerships and your plans to further develop additional community partnerships.

We have networked intensively to ensure that East Atlanta Charter School will have productive and useful partnerships with organizations across the metropolitan area and around the country. Most notably, we have partnered with Georgia State University’s Center for Urban Language Teaching and Research (CULTR). CULTR is a Title VI Language Resource Center of the U.S. Department of Education. A U.S. Department of Education Language Resource Centers (“LRCs”), CULTR is one of only 16 university-based centers in the country supported by federal grants under Title VI of the Higher Education Act. Together, these 16 LRCs make up a national network of resources to promote the teaching and learning of foreign languages by creating language learning and teaching materials, offering professional development opportunities for teachers and instructors, and conducting research on foreign language learning. (See Exhibit 8.) Founded in 2014 and based at Georgia State University, CULTR is a partnership of the Departments of Modern and Classical Languages and the Department of Applied Linguistics/ESL in the College of Arts and Sciences and the Division of Learning Technologies in the College of Education, in collaboration with the Center for Instructional Innovation. CULTR endeavors to enhance the opportunities of urban and underrepresented students to achieve the language proficiency and cultural competence required for success in the modern global marketplace. Through a variety of initiatives that support research into world language teaching and learning, the development and dissemination of innovative language methodologies and technologies, and through the provision of professional support for language instructors, the mission of CULTR is to promote and improve access to language learning opportunities and global awareness for all learners, opening opportunities for urban students to explore and envision global careers in cultural diplomacy, national security, international business, public health, or the sciences. While education offers individual opportunities alongside wider social benefits, access to education has become increasingly unequal, diverging along social class and, consequently racial, ethnic, and gender lines. Schools in urban areas are frequently under-resourced and accountability concerns in areas such as reading and math sometimes lead to reductions in offerings of courses not deemed “essential,” including foreign languages. These students, many already under-represented, are further marginalized and barred from participation in the opportunities presented by globalization. 5

East Atlanta Charter School Petition   

Dr. William Nichols, one of three Co-Directors of CULTR, has submitted a letter of support, stating in part: “Given our purpose of enhancing opportunities for urban and under-‐represented students, CULTR recognizes the potential for a powerful, longstanding partnership with East Atlanta Charter School, which will serve a predominately minority and socioeconomically disadvantaged student population. Given its proximity to GSU and the fact that we can be involved from the very inception of the school, we are particularly well positioned to establish this important collaboration.” Further, CULTR has identified specific areas in which it plans to provide ongoing support to EACS, including: • CULTR will assist in identifying and pursuing appropriate grant opportunities, such as the Foreign Language Assistance Program (LEAS) which provides grants to establish, improve, or expand innovative foreign language programs for elementary and secondary school students. • CULTR proposes to offer workshops for all East Atlanta language teachers. Topics will include technology for language teaching, assessment in the language classroom, and teaching heritage language students. • CULTR will invite East Atlanta Language Teachers to participate in CULTR’s Language Teacher Retention Institute that will serve to develop communication and professional mentoring networks that work to establish the base of a multi-layered mentoring/enrichment program to reduce burnout and attrition in language teachers. • CULTR will provide programming and curricular enhancement and evaluation related to foreign language teaching. • CULTR agrees that one of the three CULTR Co-Directors will reside on the governing board of East Atlanta Charter School on a rotating basis allowing CULTR to provide ongoing professional advice and mentorship to the governing Additionally, we have received pledges of support from other institutions, such as other schools (including The Language Garden, a Spanish immersion preschool that serves many families who reside within the McNair Cluster and the Atlanta International School, the metropolitan area’s oldest, largest, and most highly regarded school offering language immersion to all students). We have also received letters of support from several private businesses and the State Bar of Georgia, the organization to which all licensed Georgia lawyers belong, which exists to foster among Georgia lawyers the principles of duty and service to the public; to improve the administration of justice; and to advance the science of law. iv.

Provide a list of organizations that have committed to partner with your school and the potential nature of the partnerships. Provide evidence of support from the partners in the Appendix.

Please see the Appendix, in particular Exhibits 8 and 20. d. What is the Charter School’s Mission? How does it support the legislative intent of the school’s program to “increase student achievement through academic and organizational innovation?”

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East Atlanta Charter School Petition   

The mission of East Atlanta Charter School is to nurture a community of young scholars who will not only achieve very high standardized test scores, but who will also be uncommonly adept at expressing themselves effectively in myriad settings. Our curriculum will focus on the liberal arts, and we will utilize evidence-based best practices in education and classroom management. East Atlanta Charter School teachers will engage and inspire children through highly interactive and student-centered lessons that harness the intense curiosity innate to children. Few Georgia public elementary schools offer second language learning opportunities, and even fewer provide the sustained, wide-ranging instruction and exposure that leads to advanced second language proficiency. East Atlanta Charter School will incorporate Spanish language learning extensively--both throughout the curriculum and across all grade levels-- so that our students obtain the demonstrable benefits of becoming bilingual and biliterate. Namely, each student will develop high proficiency in Spanish; improved performance on standardized tests of English and math; enhanced cognitive skills in areas such as memory, cognitive flexibility, attention control, and problem solving skills, as well as an enhanced understanding of English; increased cultural sensitivity; and the long-term benefits of being better prepared for the global community and job markets where a second language is an asset. Spanish is a natural choice for our school’s second language. Spanish is the second-most spoken language in Georgia, and the primary language of about half a million people in the Atlanta metropolitan area. (See Exhibit 3.) In addition to Georgia State University’s Center for Urban Language Teaching and Research (CULTR), East Atlanta Charter School has also gained the support of a notable national leader on bilingual education, Dr. Rebecca Callahan. (See Exhibit 4.) Dr. Callahan is a University of Texas professor in the Department of Curriculum & Instruction and Population Research Center and the author of The Bilingual Advantage: Language, Literacy and the US Labor Market. In her letter of support for EACS, Dr. Callahan states: “[R]ecent research has found an economic advantage to maintaining bilingualism and developing biliteracy as the EACS model proposes to do. In fact, among young adults today, researchers have found a significant advantage in college-going, but also in the likelihood of being hired, and once employed, in the wages earned. Employers report that they are more likely to choose a bilingual employee, all else equal, and more likely to retain bilingual and biliterate employees when facing layoffs and other difficult decisions. The EACS proposal offers not only to address a gap in the educational offerings of the region, but also to provide rich educational, and linguistic, support to a traditionally marginalized student population. I look forward to seeing the EACS community of students in action in the future!” Our mission is closely aligned to the mission of the DeKalb County School System: “to form a collaborative effort between home and school that maximizes students' social and academic potential preparing them to compete in a global society.” e. Please provide specific examples of and documentation regarding programs that would be offered by your school that are not offered in any existing schools in DCSD. Please see Board Policy IBB. “Based on what global companies in Georgia tell us, we have set a goal for Georgia to have twenty dual-immersion programs in place by 2020. These programs will help ensure a Georgia workforce that is fluent in languages and skilled at cultural interactions that are

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East Atlanta Charter School Petition   

necessary for the economic development of our state and region.” -- State School Superintendent Dr. John Barge. (See Exhibit 1.) In 2014 in the DeKalb School District, only 1,960 children (less than 2% of students in the district) were attending a school that offered dual language immersion instruction. Approximately one half of one percent of DeKalb students were actually participating in a dual language immersion program in any language. Dual language immersion is not a concept invented by the founders of East Atlanta Charter School. Rather, it is a relatively recent breakthrough in elementary education that has lately been gaining greater attention throughout the United States. The Georgia Department of Education set a goal for there to be at least 20 dual language immersion programs in public schools in Georgia by 2020. Thus far, there are 14 programs in Georgia that offer at least a kindergarten immersion program (including 10 traditional public schools and 4 public charter schools). There is no whole-school dual immersion program in DeKalb where every student is learning the same second language. Further, the students of South DeKalb do not yet have meaningful access to dual language immersion education at all. Of the four existing programs in the DeKalb School District, three programs operate within traditional public schools and limit participation to students residing in the local elementary attendance zone (Ashford Park Elementary offers a German-English program; Evansdale Elementary offers a French-English program; and Rockbridge Elementary offers a French-English program). There is only one public dual language immersion program for which children from South DeKalb may apply, which is the Globe Academy Charter School. While the Globe Academy differs from East Atlanta Charter School in many significant ways, perhaps the most fundamental concern regarding how it is not meeting the needs of South DeKalb’s children is that it is located near the opposite end of the school district and does not provide student transportation. Thus, parents who wanted to drive their children from the McNair cluster geographic area would need to drive up to 20 miles each way. Making two round trips per day in standard traffic conditions would take approximately 3 hours per day. Many South DeKalb families have neither the time nor the financial resources to dedicate 15 hours per week to driving a child to and from school. Georgia Department of Education cites the following benefits of Dual Language Immersion (“DLI”):   



Second Language Skills: DLI students achieve higher proficiency in the second language than with traditional Foreign Language instruction. Cognitive Skills: DLI students typically develop greater cognitive flexibility, demonstrating increased attention and memory, superior problem-solving skills as well as an enhanced understanding of their primary language. Performance on Standardized Tests: DLI students perform as well as or better than English-only students on standardized tests in English, including students from a range of socioeconomic and ethnic backgrounds, as well as with diverse cognitive and linguistic abilities. Intercultural Competency: DLI students are more aware of and generally show more positive attitudes towards other cultures and an appreciation of other people.

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East Atlanta Charter School Petition   

 

Long-Term Benefits: DLI students are better prepared for the global community and job markets in the 21st century. Higher Attendance-Rates and Fewer Drop-Outs: Students from DLI programs have higher attendance rates and lower drop-out rates compared to regular programs. (See Exhibit 1.)

The DeKalb County School District cites the following goals for its dual-language immersion programs:      

Improve literacy skills; Increase academic achievement in all content areas; Increase achievement in reading and mathematics significantly; Instill cultural competence; prepare students to be sensitive and skilled in working with others across cultures; Prepare students to be collaborators; and Prepare students to enter the global workforce. (See Exhibit 2.)

In order to meet the objectives of the Georgia Department of Education and of the DeKalb County School District that a critical mass of children become proficient in a world language through dual language immersion education, and in order to open that opportunity to the children of South DeKalb, there must be another option which is geographically suitable and tailored to the needs and desires of the families of South DeKalb. Dual language immersion education should not be restricted to more socioeconomically privileged students in the north part of the county, but rather should be accessible to South DeKalb’s children. In addition to providing the only whole-school Spanish immersion program, East Atlanta Charter School will also be the only dual language immersion program serving diverse and predominantly low-income families. It will provide cultural and pre-professional opportunities to a population of students who historically have had a very low rate of high school graduation. Toward the goal of helping its student population close the achievement gap, it will provide extensive support services for families, most of whom will not be refugees or immigrants, but who have nonetheless struggled to gain economic traction for various reasons. East Atlanta Charter School will be the only program in DeKalb County School District where 100% of fifth graders will speak Spanish proficiently. East Atlanta Charter School has a pragmatic mission aligned with the needs of the families of South DeKalb. Spanish was chosen as the school’s second language not only because of the availability of Spanish-speaking teachers and high-quality instructional materials aligned perfectly with the Georgia Common Core standards, but also because Spanish language proficiency, more than French, German, Mandarin, or any other language, is a valuable asset in the workforce in Georgia. While there is value and worth in studying a dead language or a language that very few Americans will ever encounter, Spanish holds the same advantages, plus it is extremely practical. East Atlanta Charter School will provide very rigorous academic training that will ideally situate its 11 year old fifth graders to continue on the road toward university education, but which will also prepare them for their eventual entry into the workforce. Students who complete 6 years at East Atlanta Charter School will have received a strong academic foundation for success in middle school, high school, and college, but with their fluency in Spanish, they will also have a 9

East Atlanta Charter School Petition   

lasting, valuable, marketable, and practical skill. For a student who does not pursue higher education or even necessarily complete high school, his Spanish bilingual ability could be one of the few marketable skills he may have to put on his resume. Every student who completes his or her studies at the East Atlanta Charter School will benefit from all of the research-proven benefits of bilingual education and will be prepared to succeed in middle school. Some will undoubtedly go on to excel in high school, attend prestigious universities, and enter elite fields such as medicine and law. But while many will follow this time-tested yet lengthy path to professional and economic success, others will be prepared to seize more immediate opportunities that exist because of their Spanish bilingualism. One classmate could start his own contracting business, in which he hires and manages Spanishspeaking laborers. Another student could open her own restaurant. Another could work as a diplomat or as a border patrol officer. Another could become a certified court translator or Spanish-language customer service representative, and still another could go into the burgeoning tourism industry of DeKalb County. All of these students will be able to communicate with the substantial minority of people living in the U.S. who speak Spanish as their first, and often only, language. And all of these students will be able to command a higher income and have more professional opportunities because of their bilingual proficiency. Please see Exhibit 6 for a sampling of metropolitan Atlanta employers seeking Spanish speakers for positions across all industries today. The students’ Spanish-language instruction detracts nothing from their subject-matter learning in all of the standard academic areas. Just as one East Atlanta Charter School alumna may one day use her Spanish skills as an interpreter or teacher, another may go in a direction where speaking Spanish is not part of her career. She, too, will reap academic and social benefits from East Atlanta Charter School, where becoming bilingual in Spanish will happen together with learning the full slate of traditional school subjects. The DeKalb County School District and the Georgia Department of Education agree that dual language immersion is proven to lead to advanced second language proficiency while augmenting core academic skills. Yet, nowhere in the district is there a program tailored for a population of low-income students who historically have entered the workforce without attending college. Bilingualism in Spanish is probably the most sought-after, discrete marketable skill that an elementary school could instill in its students. Elementary school is the perfect age to develop second-language proficiency, and one’s ability to do so drops precipitously with age, becoming dramatically weaker by high school when Georgia's students typically first encounter second-language instruction. By high school, having lost the cognitive ability to learn a foreign language easily, most students learn and retain very little and do not become functionally bilingual. It is a running joke in America to laugh about how many years of foreign language classes you took in high school, and on vacation you couldn’t even remember how to ask for directions on the street in that foreign language. This is profoundly different than the experience of dual language immersion in elementary school and the results one achieves through long-term participation in such a program. Unlike other DeKalb charter schools serving overwhelming economically disadvantaged and racially homogenous minority student populations, such as the student population attending schools in the McNair cluster, East Atlanta Charter School offers a carrot and not a stick. Instead of cultivating a rigid school environment and stressful obsession with standardized tests, East Atlanta Charter School will uplift disadvantaged students with Spanish bilingualism -

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East Atlanta Charter School Petition   

a meaningful, marketable skill that enhances academic learning - while increasing opportunities to succeed for all students, whether headed toward elite universities or straight into the workforce. II. ACADEMIC OBJECTIVES, PLANS, AND WAIVERS 2. What are your school’s performance objectives for the proposed charter term? a. As background for your answer to this question, please see the CCRPI and Beating the Odds goals (Attachments A and B) and review the PowerPoint found on the GADOE’s Charter Schools Division’s website. These goals will be included in your charter contract. The Attachments A and B were reviewed and have informed the goals outlined below. b. In your answer to this question, you will list the specific areas you will target to achieve your CCRPI and Beating the Odds goals. In order to achieve our CCRPI and Beating the Odds goals, we will target our Reading, ELA, and Math scores. In order to achieve our targets, we will increase the minutes of Literacy and Math instruction students receive each day. Please see the attached copy of our proposed school schedule for further details. Furthermore, research indicates that dual-language instruction leads to equivalent or increased scores in Math and Reading. According to “What the Research Says About Immersion,” by Tara Williams Fortune of the Center for Advanced Research on Language Acquisition at the University of Minnesota, based on the research of Lindholm-Leary and Turnbull, Lapkin, and Hart, “English proficient immersion students are capable of achieving as well as, and in some cases better than, non-immersion peers on standardized measures of reading and math.” This research indicates that dual-language immersion, in and of itself, will potentially benefit students’ standardized test scores. (See Exhibit 5.) c. For example, you may choose to target Math or ELA to raise your overall CCRPI score – because your current Math or ELA scores are dragging your CCRPI score down. Please see the answer listed above, which states that we will be targeting Reading, ELA, and Math, as well as how we will raise student achievement in these three critical subjects. d. As a way to be competitive on Beating the Odds, you may also choose to focus on closing the gap in your school between educationally advantaged and educationally disadvantaged students – or you may choose to ensure gifted students are well-served, since average-performing gifted students will lower your Beating the Odds ranking compared to schools and districts with high-performing gifted students. Because our target geographic regions will pull students of a variety of socioeconomic backgrounds, we seek to level the playing field through bilingual education. East Atlanta Charter School values dual-language immersion because research proves that dual-language immersion levels the academic playing field between middle-class and low-income students. In their article “Foreign Languages and the Achievement Gap,” the Joint National Committee For Languages (JNCL) and the National Council For Languages And International Studies (NCLIS) state, “Dual Language Immersion, where students learn academic subjects in English and

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East Atlanta Charter School Petition   

another language, offers a positive and powerful approach to closing achievement gaps for African-Americans and students of low socioeconomic status.” The JNCL and NCLIS also write that the state of North Carolina has seen dramatic achievement gains from low socioeconomic students through their implementation of dual immersion instruction. (See Exhibit 5.) North Carolina’s data specifically show that:  3 rd and 4th grade African American students in immersion score between ½ and 1 full year ahead of other African American students, in English reading;  5 th through 8th graders score between ¾ and 2 years ahead of their peers in English reading.  When compared to the overall statewide scores, African American children in immersion close the achievement gap (compared to the overall performance statewide) by the 8th grade. “The Effects of Bilingualism on Cognitive Development” by Y.G. Rodriguez states that “the evidence seems to suggest that bilingualism may scaffold concept formation and general mental flexibility.” This evidence shows that through bilingual education, children can obtain the ability to grasp concepts and engage in flexible thinking, which will help children from low-performing areas achieve at higher levels. Furthermore, “Positive effects of bilingualism were found on both episodic memory and semantic memory at all age levels,” according to to R.Kormi-Nouri, S. Moniri, and L Nilsson in their article, “Episodic and Semantic Memory in Bilingual and Monolingual Children.” This indicates that children receiving bilingual education will have stronger memory function than they would in an equivalent monolingual setting, which will further their academic achievement and ability to compete with same-age peers. e. Indicate the expected rate of student performance growth in each year of the proposed charter term. As indicated below in the chart outlining projected student growth for our founding first grade cohort, the percentage of students achieving on or above grade level is expected to grow 5% for each year that a student attends our school. On an individual student level, students will be pushed to meet aggressive growth targets on the MAP test, as outlined by the following chart. MAP Percentile 75th percentile or above 50th percentile to 74th percentile 25th percentile to 49th percentile 1st percentile to 24th percentile

Expected Growth In One Year 103% of projected growth goal (according to NWEA) 108% of projected growth goal (according to NWEA) 113% of projected growth goal (according to NWEA) 118% of projected growth goal (according to NWEA)

By setting tiered growth targets according to what quartile in which a student scores in, students will move through the quartiles the longer they are with us. For example, if we were merely to expect a student scoring in the 24th percentile to make one year’s growth, then at the end of the year, that student would still score in the 24th percentile. However, a student who makes 118% of one year’s growth would move to the next quartile. Over multiple years, this growth will move the student so that he/she is achieving on or above grade level.

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East Atlanta Charter School Petition   

However, at East Atlanta Charter School, we expect all of our students to make higher than projected growth in a year. Therefore, even the highest performing students will be pushed to beat their projected growth goal by 3% (or, in other words, to grow at a rate 3% higher than projected). f.

You are encouraged to include all or some of the components of the current draft of the Georgia Department of Education’s College and Career Ready Performance Index (CCRPI).

All Georgia Milestones performance objectives are informed by the current draft of the Georgia Department of Education’s College and Career Ready Performance Index. g. You are urged to include cohort measures that show the progress over time of a single cohort of students. Please see chart below regarding specific goals for the founding first-grade cohort. h. You are also urged to include national norm-referenced test results among your performance measures. Common Core MAP (Measures of Academic Progress) will be used in each of our subject-area academic performance objectives (except those for Spanish Language Acquisition). MAP is a norm-referenced test created by the NWEA and used across the United States. i.

Be specific, measurable, attainable, relevant, and time-based (SMART).

East Atlanta Charter School sets the following rigorous academic performance objectives. (Note that all MAP scores will be the Common Core versions of the MAP.) Reading Subject Reading

Language Arts

Math

Science

MAP 70% of students will meet their RIT growth goals for the year.

GA Milestones Other Measure 92% of students will meet on the Georgia Milestones EOG test. 12% of students will exceed on the Georgia Milestones EOG test. 70% of students 85% of students will meet will meet their on the Georgia Milestones RIT growth EOG tests. 12% of goals for the students will exceed on the year. Georgia Milestones EOG test. 70% of students 77% of students will meet will meet their on the Georgia Milestones RIT growth EOG tests. 8% of students goals for the will exceed on the Georgia year. Milestones EOG test. 65% of students 70% of students will meet will meet their on the Georgia Milestones

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Social Studies

Oral Reading Fluency

Word Use Fluency

Reading Comprehension

Spanish Oral Language Fluency

RIT growth goals for the year. 65% of students will meet their RIT growth goals for the year.

EOG tests. 5% of students will exceed on the Georgia Milestones EOG tests. 73% of students will meet on the Georgia Milestones EOG tests. 5% of students will exceed on the Georgia Milestones EOG tests. 75% of students will meet the following Words Correct Per Minute Goals using DIBELS Oral Reading Fluency: K: N/A 1: 47 2: 96 3: 110 4: 114 5: 127 75% of students will meet the following Word Use Fluency Goals using the DIBELS Word Use Fluency indicator: K: 37 1: 47 2: 50 3: N/A 4: N/A 5: N/A 75% of students will meet the following Reading Comprehension Goals using the Fountas and Pinnell Benchmark Assessment: K: D 1: J 2: M 3: P 4: S 5: V 80% of students will achieve at the following levels: K: Novice-High oral fluency rate 1: Novice-High oral fluency rate (year one); Intermediate-Low oral fluency rate (years two through five) 2: Intermediate-Mid oral fluency rate 3: Intermediate-

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High oral fluency rate 4: Advanced-Low oral fluency rate 5: Advanced-Mid oral fluency rate 80% of students will achieve at the following levels: K: Novice-High writing/ composition rating 1: Novice-High writing/composition fluency rate (year one); IntermediateLow writing/composition rate (years two through five) 2: Intermediate-Mid writing/composition rate 3: IntermediateHigh writing/composition rate 4: Advanced-Low writing/composition rate5: Advanced-Mid writing/composition rate

Spanish Written Composition

Our Spanish proficiency objectives are reflective of students’ progressive mastery toward oral and written fluency in Spanish. Objectives are written from a standpoint of considering students’ first age of exposure to second language exposure (assuming that second language acquisition beginning in elementary school usually takes approximately 5 years to reach proficiency), as well as individual variability in the overall population in terms of ability to acquire second language fluency in childhood.

School-Wide Objectives for Year 1 and Year 5: Year 1

Year 5

Oral Fluency

By the end of Year 1, 80% of all students will achieve at least a Novice-High oral fluency rate in Spanish, as measured by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Language (ACTFL) Proficiency Rubric.

Written Fluency

By the end of Year 1, 80% of all students will achieve at a NoviceMid written fluency rate in Spanish, as measured by the ACTFL Proficiency Rubric.

Oral Fluency

By the end of Year 5, 90% of 4th and 100% of 5th grade students will achieve at least an Intermediate-High fluency rate in Spanish, as measured by the ACTFL Proficiency Rubric.

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Written Fluency

By the end of Year 5, 90% of 4th and 100% of 5th grade students will achieve at least an Intermediate-High written fluency rate in Spanish, as measured by the ACTFL Proficiency Rubric.

Please see the definition of these standards at Exhibit 12, The American Council on the Teach of Foreign Languages Performance Descriptors for Language Learners. Cohort Measures: East Atlanta Charter School projects the following performance standards for the founding first-grade cohort. Year 1 (Spring) Year 2 (Spring) Year 3 (Spring) Year 4 (Spring) Year 5 (Spring) 60% of 65% of second 70% of third 75% of fourth 80% of fifth incoming first graders from the graders from the graders from the graders from the graders will original cohort original cohort original cohort original cohort score in the will score in the will score in the will score in the will score in the 50th percentile 50th percentile 50th percentile 50th percentile 50th percentile or higher or higher or higher or higher or higher according to the according to the according to the according to the according to the NWEA’s MAP NWEA’s MAP NWEA’s MAP NWEA’s MAP NWEA’s MAP (Measures of (Measures of (Measures of (Measures of (Measures of Academic Academic Academic Academic Academic Progress), a Progress), a Progress), a Progress), a Progress), a normnormnormnormnormreferenced test referenced test referenced test referenced test referenced test ELA MAP 60% of 65% of second 70% of third 75% of fourth 80% of fifth incoming first graders from the graders from the graders from the graders from the graders will original cohort original cohort original cohort original cohort score in the will score in the will score in the will score in the will score in the 50th percentile 50th percentile 50th percentile 50th percentile 50th percentile or higher or higher or higher or higher or higher according to the according to the according to the according to the according to the NWEA’s MAP NWEA’s MAP NWEA’s MAP NWEA’s MAP NWEA’s MAP (Measures of (Measures of (Measures of (Measures of (Measures of Academic Academic Academic Academic Academic Progress), a Progress), a Progress), a Progress), a Progress), a normnormnormnormnormreferenced test referenced test referenced test referenced test referenced test Math 60% of 65% of second 70% of third 75% of fourth 80% of fifth MAP incoming first graders from the graders from the graders from the graders from the graders will original cohort original cohort original cohort original cohort score in the will score in the will score in the will score in the will score in the 50th percentile 50th percentile 50th percentile 50th percentile 50th percentile or higher or higher or higher or higher or higher according to the according to the according to the according to the according to the NWEA’s MAP NWEA’s MAP NWEA’s MAP NWEA’s MAP NWEA’s MAP (Measures of (Measures of (Measures of (Measures of (Measures of Academic Academic Academic Academic Academic Reading MAP

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Science MAP

Social Studies MAP

Progress), a Progress), a Progress), a Progress), a Progress), a normnormnormnormnormreferenced test referenced test referenced test referenced test referenced test 55% of 60% of second 65% of third 70% of fourth 75% of fifth incoming first graders from the graders from the graders from the graders from the graders will original cohort original cohort original cohort original cohort score in the will score in the will score in the will score in the will score in the 50th percentile 50th percentile 50th percentile 50th percentile 50th percentile or higher or higher or higher or higher or higher according to the according to the according to the according to the according to the NWEA’s MAP NWEA’s MAP NWEA’s MAP NWEA’s MAP NWEA’s MAP (Measures of (Measures of (Measures of (Measures of (Measures of Academic Academic Academic Academic Academic Progress), a Progress), a Progress), a Progress), a Progress), a normnormnormnormnormreferenced test referenced test referenced test referenced test referenced test 55% of 60% of second 65% of third 65% of fourth 70% of fifth incoming first graders from the graders from the graders from the graders from the graders will original cohort original cohort original cohort original cohort score in the will score in the will score in the will score in the will score in the 50th percentile 50th percentile 50th percentile 50th percentile 50th percentile or higher or higher or higher or higher or higher according to the according to the according to the according to the according to the NWEA’s MAP NWEA’s MAP NWEA’s MAP NWEA’s MAP NWEA’s MAP (Measures of (Measures of (Measures of (Measures of (Measures of Academic Academic Academic Academic Academic Progress), a Progress), a Progress), a Progress), a Progress), a normnormnormnormnormreferenced test referenced test referenced test referenced test referenced test

3. How will the charter school governing board, management, instructional leadership, faculty and staff know that students are on track to meet these academic goals? a. What assessments will the school administer to obtain performance data for each student? Please refer below to the answer to Question 2, sub-part b. b.

Describe how the school will obtain baseline achievement data.

In August of each academic year, faculty will administer the following screening assessments in order to obtain baseline achievement data in the areas of Reading, Language Arts, Math, Science, and Social Studies. (See DIBELS information at Appendix-286.) Subject Oral Reading Fluency Word Use Fluency Reading Comprehension Reading (General)

Assessment DIBELS assessment for grades 1 through 5 DIBELS assessment for grades k through 2 Fountas and Pinnell Benchmark Assessment System Common Core MAP Reading Assessment 17

East Atlanta Charter School Petition   

English Language Arts Math Social Studies Science c.

Common Core MAP Language Arts Assessment Common Core MAP Math Assessment MAP Social Studies Assessment MAP Science Assessment

Describe how the school will benchmark student growth.

East Atlanta Charter School will benchmark student growth through the following measures:

Reading

Language Arts

Math

Science

Social Studies

Milestones Measure MAP EOY Benchmark Measure Students will take the MAP Common Core aligned benchmarks will be test in the winter of each administered in October and February of each year to year to determine if they are determine students’ mastery of grade level standards. on track to meet their EOY School will use a variety of resources to create goal. benchmarks, including those produced by the Georgia DOE Students will take the MAP Common Core aligned benchmarks will be test in the winter of each administered in October and February of each year to year to determine if they are determine students’ mastery of grade level standards. on track to meet their EOY School will use a variety of resources to create goal. benchmarks, including those produced by the Georgia DOE Students will take the MAP Common Core aligned benchmarks will be test in the winter of each administered in October and February of each year to year to determine if they are determine students’ mastery of grade level standards. on track to meet their EOY School will use a variety of resources to create goal. benchmarks, including those produced by the Georgia DOE Students will take the MAP Benchmarks will be administered in October and test in the winter of each February of each year. Benchmarks will be aligned year to determine if they are with state standards and will be created using on track to meet their EOY resources from the Georgia DOE. goal. Students will take the MAP Benchmarks will be administered in October and test in the winter of each February of each year. Benchmarks will be aligned year to determine if they are with state standards and be created using resources on track to meet their EOY from the Georgia DOE. goal.

d. Describe plans to formally and informally assess student performance in the core academic areas. Throughout the school year, students will be formally assessed in core academic subjects (defined as Reading, Language Arts, Math, Science, Social Studies, and Spanish Language Acquisition) through weekly formative assessments, unit-based summative assessments, termbased benchmarks, term-based ACTFL (American Council for the Teaching of Foreign Language--used for assessing Spanish Oral Fluency and Spanish Written Fluency) assessments 18

East Atlanta Charter School Petition   

and the MAP test administered in the fall, winter, and spring. Furthermore, teachers will be required to implement daily Checks for Understanding (CFUs) and administer a daily formative assessment--which may be an exit slip, an independent practice, a CFU, or any other authentic data collection materials. During their daily after school planning time, teachers will be required to analyze daily formative assessments and use that data to inform and adjust (as needed) their future lesson plans. Students will also be measured using the Fountas and Pinnell Benchmark Assessment System, administered four times per year, and DIBELS Word Use Fluency, administered four times per year (K through 2) and Oral Reading Fluency, administered four times per year (1 through 5). (See Appendix-285.) e. Explain how the charter school will work with the local school system to participate in all state-mandated assessments. Provide a statement that the charter school will administer all state assessments in accordance with the DCSD testing calendar. East Atlanta Charter School will coordinate with DeKalb County Schools by sending an assigned Testing Coordinator to all training meetings regarding state-mandated assessments. East Atlanta Charter School will administer all state assessments in accordance with the DCSD testing calendar. f. Describe plans to diagnose educational strengths and needs of students and plans on how this data will be used for instructional planning. Educational strengths and needs of students will be assessed through a rigorous cycle of diagnostic assessment, progress monitoring, and daily formative assessments from the classroom. Each day, teachers will have forty-five minutes of mandatory co-planning between grade level teams (one English teacher and one Spanish teacher per team) in order to review the daily formative assessment, group students, form plans for re-teaching and spiral review, and modify the next day’s lesson plans if necessary. Furthermore, teachers will be required to attend professional development sessions in which they review formative and summative assessment data in grade level and/or content teams at least once every four weeks and to modify lesson plans accordingly. Teachers will be expected to differentiate within their classes in order to meet the individual needs of their students and to ensure that each child is being taught at his/her instructional level. g. Describe the school’s plan for using assessment data to monitor and improve achievement for all students over a set period of time. East Atlanta Charter School will use the MAP assessment to monitor growth over time. The MAP assessment system automatically produces growth goals for each student. The MAP will be administered in the fall, winter, and spring of each year in order to determine if students are on track to meet their growth target (winter) and to determine if students have met their growth target (spring). Furthermore, as described above in Question 2, sub-point f, teachers will meet daily to review formative assessment data. Data will also be reviewed at professional developments sessions at least once every four weeks and used to inform lesson planning in order to drive student achievement. During these professional development sessions, teachers will also review relevant benchmark data, create action plans, and use these action plans to guide their instruction. Through consistent assessment, analysis, and data-driven instruction, students will be able to meet the school’s performance objectives.

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h. Describe how the charter school shall comply with the accountability provisions of O.C.G.A. § 20-14-30 through § 20-14-41 and federal accountability requirements. East Atlanta Charter School acknowledges it is subject to the accountability provisions of O.C.G.A. §§ 20-14-30 through 20-14-41, and will participate in all state-required testing as stated in SBOE Rule 160-3-1-.07, as well as any federal accountability requirements. This includes alignment to all guidelines around how and when assessments are administered and by whom. A designated staff member will be responsible for coordinating assessment administration and will participate in applicable training made available, as well as serving as primary point of contact for all assessment matters. i. Describe how the charter will adhere to all assessment guidelines and procedures as outlined by the State Assessment Handbook, the State Accommodations Manual and other state and local guidance on assessment. East Atlanta Charter School will adhere to all assessment guidelines and procedures as outlined by the State Assessment Handbook and the State Accommodations Manual. East Atlanta Charter School will send a staff member delegate to all required test administration training. The staff member delegated will then train all staff members on the State Assessment Handbook, and further will train all staff members who are testing students who receive accommodations on the State Accommodation Manual. Staff members will be trained in all state and local requirements for testing administration, security, and check-in and check-out procedures. Staff members will follow all required protocol pertaining to testing examiners, testing proctors, and hall monitors. Staff members will be required to attend testing trainings and documentation of attendance will be obtained through staff signatures on a sign-in log. j. Describe how staff from the charter school will attend required test administration training held by DCSD. Each year, a staff member from East Atlanta Charter School will attend all district required test administration training for DeKalb County School District. The first year, the testing coordinator will be a member of leadership team (probably the SELT). After a Vice Principal is hired, the testing coordinator will be the Vice Principal. However, the Principal of the school will be ultimately responsible for all testing regulations and proper administration. 4. What specific actions will the school’s management, instructional leadership; faculty and staff take to ensure student performance objectives are met during the proposed charter term? The school management, instructional leadership, faculty, and staff will take the following steps in order to ensure that student performance objectives are met during the five-year proposed charter term: 1. During teacher pre-planning each fall, teachers will work with their instructional manager to set clear performance objectives based on the Georgia TKES standard. 2. Teachers will be observed by their instructional manager three times each nine weeks and have a formal performance review at the end of each nine weeks using their performance objectives and the Georgia TKES standard. 3. Teachers will participate in regularly scheduled (defined as once every four weeks) professional development sessions in which teachers are required to review MAP data,

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formative and summative assessment data, and benchmark data. Teachers will use this data to drive their instruction. a. Describe the focus of the curriculum. This statement should also discuss any distinctive or unique instructional methods to be used that are research-based and standards driven. East Atlanta Charter School will have a fully dual-language immersion curriculum. The instruction will occur fifty percent in English and fifty percent in Spanish. Students will have two teachers each year--one English teacher who only teaches content in English, and one Spanish teacher who only teaches content in Spanish. b. A full and complete curriculum, aligned, for all grade levels to be served during the proposed charter term is required to be submitted as an Appendix item. This information must be aligned with Common Core and Georgia Performance Standards (where applicable). While East Atlanta Charter School will closely follow the Common Core standards in all grade levels and will rely on the curricular framework developed by Great Minds/Engage NY, we will also give wide latitude to our teachers to select texts, create interesting and engaging lesson plans, and collaborate with other teachers to generate new materials. Please see our full curriculum with alignment to Georgia Performance Standards at Exhibit 10. Our academic goals will be well served within the framework of Common Core. The Common Core framework will allow our teachers to have a great deal of flexibility in delivery of instruction. Thus, we will not require teachers to use (or not use) any particular style of teaching, or any particular textbook. East Atlanta Charter School’s educators will come from myriad backgrounds, very likely including teachers who have been educated abroad or who have taught in other countries; we expect each teacher to rely on a wide variety of tools and skills to teach effectively. While all EACS teachers will participate in ongoing training and workshops in the United States, delivered by our partner Georgia State University Center for Urban Language Teaching and Research and other reputable, accredited institutions, we also expect our teachers to rely on their experience to inform their teaching style. Our teachers will work in partnership with each other. Each class will receive instruction in Spanish for half of the day and English the second half of the day. Thus, each teacher will set up the arrangement of his or her own classroom, will decide when and how to break the class into smaller groups for differentiated instruction, and will collaborate intensively with his or her partner teacher. One way that EACS will attract and retain top teachers will be to treat them as professionals and trust them to use their professional skills and judgment to teach effectively, while closely supervising their performance and providing frequent, meaningful feedback. COMMON CORE STANDARDS ACROSS ALL SUBJECTS, IN BOTH LANGUAGES The San Diego Country Office of Education maintains the “COMMON CORE en Español State Standards Initiative Translation Project” website at http://commoncore-espanol.com/. There, permanently and free of charge, any school can access a version the California Common Core Language Arts and Literacy in History-Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects Standards Standards (Common Core ELA/Literacy) and the Mathematics standards into Spanish. This is not just a mere word-for-word translation, but instead has been both translated and linguistically augmented to meet both the Common Core principles, but also the unique attributes of the Spanish language.

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East Atlanta Charter School Petition   

The translation and linguistic augmentation of the Common Core Standards in Spanish affords us the opportunity to re-conceptualize classroom practices by acknowledging the ways that students authentically use a primary and second language to organize higher mental processes, mediate cognition, and develop autonomy as they become proficiently biliterate. The Spanish translation of the California Common Core State Standards for Language Arts, Literacy in History and Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects, also presents a new opportunity for the leadership of students, parents, teachers, and school administrators to recognize the link between cognitive development and language, and embrace the responsibility for the continuous improvement of our educational system. Standards-based instruction is at the forefront of education reform because it presents a framework to ensure that all students are engaged in rigorous curricula and prepared to contribute positively to an increasingly complex world. The translated versions of the Common Core Standards establish a guide for equitable assessment and curricular development, resulting in high levels of biliteracy. The primary drafters include four language experts: Teresa Ibarra, Consultant F. Isabel Campoy, Transformative Education Institute; Pía Castilleja, Stanford University Silvia Dorta-Duque de Reyes, San Diego County Office of Education The Advisory Committee overseeing the entire project included: Carrie Heath Phillips, Council of Chief State School Officers Alma Flor Ada, University of San Francisco F. Isabel Campoy, Transformative Education Institute Tom Adams, California Department of Education Cliff Rudnick, California Department of Education Lillian Perez, California Department of Education Verónica Aguila, Butte County Office of Education Mónica Nava, San Diego County Office of Education Silvia Dorta-Duque de Reyes, San Diego County Office of Education Every effort was made during the creation of COMMON CORE en Español to maintain a parallel, aligned, and equitable architecture between the Spanish translation and linguistic augmentation of the California Common Core ELA/Literacy Standards. The purpose of the linguistic augmentation is to address points of learning, skills and concepts that are specific to Spanish language and literacy, as well as transferable language learnings between English and Spanish as provided in educational settings where students are instructed in both languages. This perfectly fulfills the needs of EACS, where students will study both English Language Arts and Spanish Language Arts daily in a 50/50 dual immersion model. The COMMON CORE en Español’s linguistic augmentation was based on the conventions for oral and written Spanish from the Real Academia de la Lengua Española (RAE) promulgated in 2010. The intent is to promote the same expectations and level of rigor for Spanish usage as educators expect for English usage through quality curriculum and instruction. The linguistic augmentation also provides a structure and specific detail for the development of instructional materials that address the specific features of Spanish in support of students’

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academic language learning on par with English in dual language programs. The linguistics experts who held primary responsibility for linguistic augmentation include: Jill Kerper Mora, San Diego State University Silvia Dorta-Duque de Reyes, San Diego County Office of Education Sandra Ceja, San Diego County Office of Education Before it was widely adopted in California and across the country, the COMMON CORE en Español was piloted in the Chukla Vista Elementary School District under the supervision of Dr. Francisco Escobedo, District Superintendent; Emma Sanchez, Executive Director; and the school district’s dual language faculty. The COMMON CORE en Español project is a worthy model for EACS. It has been peer reviewed and is already in wide use in California and in immersion programs across the nation (though none yet in the state of Georgia). A Peer Review is a process of self-regulation used to provide credibility and determine the suitability of an academic document for publication. The peer review for the translation and linguistic augmentation of the Common Core Standards en Español was conducted in 2012 at the CABE Summer Institute in Long Beach, California. The esteemed panel of peer reviewers included: Ana M. Applegate, San Bernardino City Unified School District Daniel Arellano, San Bernardino City Unified School District Fausto E. Baltazar, Cajon Valley Union School District Gilberto D. Barrios, Vista Unified School District Gonzalo de Alba, Fresno Unified School District Ana María Flores, Latino Coalition for Education Charlotte Ford, Contra Costa County Office of Education Carmen Garces, Mount Diablo Unified School District Ana Celia García, San Diego State University Claudia Garcia, Sweetwater Union High School District Norma Gomez-Michel, San Diego County Office of Education Olga Gonzáles, Mexican-American Legal Defense and Education Fund María Heredia, North Monterey Unified School District Ana Hernandez, San Bernardino City Unified School District Izela Jacobo, Cajon Valley Union School District Jill Kerper-Mora, San Diego State University Olivia Leschick, Valley Center-Pauma Unified School District Sandra Lineros, Oak Grove Elementary School District Roy López, Lennox School District Martín Macías, Stanislaus County Office of Education Edna Mikulanis, San Diego Unified School District Antonio Mora, San Diego County Office of Education Karem Morales, Oak Grove Elementary School District Kris Nicholls, Riverside County Office of Education Nilda Ocasio, Mount Vernon Community School Cynthia Ortiz, Hayward Unified School District Sylvia Padilla, Long Beach Unified School District Margarita Palacios, North Monterey Unified School District Janette Perez, Santa Ana Unified School District

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East Atlanta Charter School Petition   

Lillian Perez, California Department of Education Arlene Quintana-Rangel, San Bernardino Unified School District Veronica Rodriguez, Fresno Unified School District Fernando Rodriguez-Valls, San Diego State University Luz Elena Rosales, San Bernardino Unified School District Silvina Rubinstein, Los Angeles County Office of Education Magdalena Ruz Gonzalez, Los Angeles County Office of Education Martha Servin, San Bernardino City Unified School District Araceli Simeón-Luna, Mexican-American Legal Defense and Education Fund Olivia Yahya, Saddleback Valley Unified School District Nieves Vera de Torres, Girls Preparatory Bronx Community School GREAT MINDS CURRICULUM- GEORGIA COMMON CORE Given our need to prepare EACS students to achieve high scores on the Georgia Milestones assessments, we have identified curricula which comply wholly with Georgia Common Core, or in the case of our Spanish-language curricula, which adhere to national Common Core. Georgia does not have its own Spanish-language Common Core. Instead, for Spanish-language instruction, EACS will follow the Spanish-language California Common Core Standards (CCSS). We have selected a Math and English Language Arts curriculum which has been designed specifically for Common Core (not retrofitted after Common Core was developed). EACS will use the Eureka Math and Wheatley Portfolio developed by Great Minds, a Washington, D.C. based non-profit 501(c)3 organization that seeks to ensure that all students, regardless of their circumstance, receive a content-rich education in the full range of the liberal arts and sciences, including English, mathematics, history, the arts, science, and foreign languages. Since 2007, Great Minds has worked with teachers and scholars to create instructional materials, conduct research, and promote policies that support a comprehensive and high-quality education in America’s public schools. Great Minds developed the Eureka Math curriculum and Wheatley Portfolio in partnership with the New York State Education Department. Thus, the curricular maps in the Appendix are branded as Engage NY - New York State Common Core. In fact, these free materials are extremely similar to the subscription-based Great Minds curricula not specifically branded for New York, because they were developed in tandem based on the Common Core. East Atlanta Charter School will continue to evaluate whether the minimal differences between the Engage NY and Great Minds version justify the expense of subscribing to Great Minds rather than using the publically available EngageNY-branded materials. We have used the Engage NY materials as examples for reference. The Great Minds trustees are Barbara Byrd-Bennett, Chief Executive Officer for Chicago Public Schools; Nell McAnelly, Co-Director Emeritus of the Gordon A. Cain Center for STEM Literacy at Louisiana State University; Carol Jago, Associate Director of the California Reading and Literature Project at UCLA. Dan Cookson, Founder at BansheeBox, LLC; Pascal Forgione, Jr., Executive Director of the Center on K-12 Assessment and Performance Management at ETS; Lorraine Griffith, a Title I Reading Specialist at West Buncombe Elementary in Asheville, North Carolina; Jason Griffiths, Director of Programs at the National Academy of Advanced Teacher Education; Bill Honig, President of the Consortium on Reading Excellence; William Kelly, Cofounder and CEO at ReelDx; Richard Kessler, Executive Dean of Mannes College and the New School for Music; Lynne Munson, President and Executive Director of Great Minds; and Maria Neira, former Vice President of New York State United Teachers.

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Eureka Math/EngageNY connects math to the real world in ways that take the fear out of math and build student confidence—while helping students achieve true understanding lesson by lesson and year after year. Eureka Math serves teachers, administrators, parents, and students with a comprehensive suite of innovative curriculum, in-depth professional development, books, and support materials for everyone involved. The team of teachers and mathematicians who wrote Eureka Math took great care to present mathematics in a logical progression from PK through Grade 12. This coherent approach allows teachers to know what incoming students already have learned and ensures that students are prepared for what comes next. When implemented faithfully, Eureka Math will dramatically reduce gaps in student learning, instill persistence in problem solving, and prepare students to understand advanced math. What Eureka Math is and is not: Using real-world problems Understanding why Explaining your reasoning Doing math in your head

Not endless exercises without context Not isolated memorization Not working alone Not relying on a calculator

While many curricula and textbooks on the market today describe themselves as being “aligned” with the new standards, the content is virtually unchanged from the past. Publishers have merely associated elements of the outdated content with various new standards. Eureka Math was developed specifically to meet the new standards. Eureka Math offers a comprehensive suite of curriculum, in-depth professional development, texts, tools, and support materials that work together to provide teachers, parents, and students with a cohesive approach to the ultimate goal: students who are not merely literate, but fluent, in mathematics. It’s not enough for students to know the process for solving a problem; they need to understand why that process works so they can use it anytime. Teaching mathematics as a story, Eureka Math builds students’ knowledge logically and thoroughly to help them achieve deep understanding. While this approach is unfamiliar to those of us who grew up memorizing mathematical facts and formulas, it has been tested and proven to be the most successful method in the world. Early on during the development of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS), Great Minds recognized that these influential standards would have the potential to raise student achievement if the standards were implemented with first-rate curriculum materials. Great Minds therefore set out to create tools that teachers could use to develop strong, CCSS-aligned curricula. The first tool it created is the Great Minds Curriculum for English. The curriculum provides a coherent sequence of thematic curriculum units, roughly six per grade level, K–12. The units connect the skills delineated in the CCSS in ELA with suggested works of literature and informational texts and provide sample activities that teachers can use in their classrooms. The Common Core State Standards call for the new standards to be taught within the context of a “content-rich curriculum.” But the CCSS do not specify what content students need to master, as this fell outside the scope of the standards-setting project. Here is how this is explained in the introduction to the CCSS:

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East Atlanta Charter School Petition   

“While the Standards make references to some particular forms of content, including mythology, foundational U.S. documents, and Shakespeare, they do not—indeed, cannot—enumerate all or even most of the content that students should learn. The Standards must therefore be complemented by a well-developed, content-rich curriculum consistent with the expectations laid out in this document.” Responsibility for developing such a curriculum falls to schools, districts, and states. The Great Minds Curriculum for English is designed to meet the needs of the teacher, principal, curriculum director, superintendent, or state official who is striving to develop, or to help teachers to develop, new ELA curricula aligned with the CCSS. The curriculum can also serve as a resource for those endeavoring to conduct professional development related to the standards. The development of the Great Minds Wheatley Portfolio was initially funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Currently, membership fees are the key source of support for maintaining the portfolio and for creating new curriculum-related tools and services. Engage NY offers a free version of both Eureka Math and the Wheatley Portfolio which are further tailored to specifically address New York’s version of Common Core. Wheatley Portfolio is intended to serve as a “road map” for the school year, as an aid for jumpstarting the lesson planning process. Our Portfolio does not comprise a complete curriculum, nor does it prescribe how teachers are to teach the material included in the Portfolio. As a common planning tool, the Portfolio can facilitate school and district-wide collaboration. It also can become the backbone of rich, content-based professional development as teachers work together to create and then refine curricula for their particular schools and classrooms. All standards in the CCSS K-12 standards are addressed at least once, if not a number of times. Each grade includes a “standards checklist” showing which standards are covered in which unit. The curriculum writers worked carefully to ensure that the content and skills in each unit would build on one another so that in the aggregate, all standards would be addressed in a coherent, logical way. The standards are grouped so that they could envision fitting together in one unit. For example, if a unit was focused on asking and answering questions in informational text, then standards for shared research and expository writing were included in that unit as well. Great Minds has envisioned a "complete curriculum" to be a working set of documents and practices for daily instruction and assessments that teachers collaboratively develop and refine using the content and skills delineated in the Wheatley Portfolio. A "complete curriculum" would not only include the components of our portfolios as they are now, but also provide further guidance about differentiating instruction to suit advanced and struggling students (for example, those who are reading above or below grade level, English language learners, and students with disabilities). A full curriculum would also include a scope and sequence, samples of student work, more scoring rubrics, and—ultimately—more suggested lesson plans. It could also include pacing suggestions to guide instruction of the content and skills in ways that address specific student objectives and link them to the standards, much like our sample lesson plans do. Other levels of detail might be included, such as lists of important vocabulary words for each text, assessment blueprints, detailed pacing of grammar instruction that is integrated with the work (i.e., sentence structure and usage conventions are studied in the context of what students are reading).

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East Atlanta Charter School Petition   

East Atlanta Charter School teachers will use the Wheatley Portfolio curriculum as a “road map” for the school year, using it to jumpstart the lesson planning process. As a common planning tool, the portfolio also can become the backbone of rich, content-based professional development as teachers collaborate to refine the curricula for their particular schools and classrooms. The Great Minds Wheatley Portfolio reflects the input of the many dozens of teachers who have reviewed the curriculum. In the fall of 2010 the portfolio was made available for public comment. Hundreds of teachers, superintendents, principals, curriculum directors, and many others have provided further feedback, and the curriculum has been enriched by their input. The American Federation of Teachers convened the same panel of AFT teachers that reviewed the Common Core State Standards to review the first edition of the Great Minds curriculum. The Milken Family Foundation and the National Alliance of Black School Educators assisted further in connecting Great Minds to superintendents, teachers, and content area specialists from across the country to review our curriculum as well. Wheatley Portfolio is based on the Common Core State Standards. The CCSS dictated both the goals and contours of the curriculum. In addition to the CCSS, Great Minds has consulted a wide range of model curricula and other content materials, including the International Baccalaureate course outlines, curriculum maps and scoring rubrics used by the Brooklyn Latin School, and the Massachusetts English Language Arts Curriculum Frameworks. Great Minds has incorporated the best aspects of these successful programs and materials into its curriculum, such as a focus on a sequence of specific content, the inclusion of both oral and written expressions of student proficiency, and attention to the detailed aspects of genres, subgenres, and characteristics of various kinds of literary and informational texts. Each Great Minds curricular unit includes the following components: Overview. This is a brief description of the unit. It explains the unit’s theme and provides a summary of what students will learn. It explains the structure, progression, and various components of the unit. It may offer some guidance regarding the selection of texts. The unit descriptions illuminate the connections between the skills identified in the standards and the content of the suggested works. Essential question. The “essential question” highlights the usefulness, the relevance, and the greater benefit of a unit. It is often the “so what?” question about material covered. It should be answerable, at least to some degree, by the end of the unit, but it should also have more than one possible answer. It should prompt intellectual exploration by generating other questions. Here’s an example from eighth grade: “How does learning history through literature differ from learning through informational text?” Focus standards. These standards are taken directly from the CCSS and have been identified as especially important for the unit. Other standards are covered in each unit as well, but the focus standards are the ones that the unit has been designed to address specifically. Suggested student objectives. These are the specific student outcomes for each unit. They describe the transferable ELA content and skills that students should possess when the unit is completed. The objectives are often components of more broadly-worded standards and sometimes address content and skills necessarily related to the standards. The lists are not exhaustive, and the objectives should not supplant the standards themselves. Rather, they are

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East Atlanta Charter School Petition   

designed to help teachers “drill down” from the standards and augment as necessary, providing added focus and clarity for lesson planning purposes. Suggested works. These are substantial lists of suggested literary and informational texts. In most cases (particularly in the middle and high school grades), this list contains more texts than a unit could cover; it is meant to offer a range of options to teachers. Several permutations of the list could meet the goals of the unit. The suggested texts draw heavily from the “exemplar texts” listed in the CCSS. Exemplars are works the CCSS identified as meeting the levels of complexity and rigor described in the standards. These texts are identified with an (E) after the title of an exemplar text. An (EA) indicates a work by an author who has another work cited as an exemplar text. Art, music, and media. These sections list works of visual art, music, film, and other media that reflect the theme of the unit and that a teacher can use to extend students’ knowledge in these areas. Each unit includes at least one sample activity involving the works listed under this heading. In some cases, a prompt also has been provided. ELA teachers who choose to use this material may do so on their own, by team teaching with an art or music teacher, or perhaps by sharing the material with the art or music teacher, who could reinforce what students are learning during the ELA block in their classroom. The inclusion of these works in our curriculum is not intended to substitute for or infringe in any way upon instruction students should receive in separate art and music classes. Sample activities and assessments. These items have been written particularly for the unit, with specific standards and often with specific texts in mind. Each activity addresses at least one standard in the CCSS; the applicable standard(s) are cited in parentheses following the description of each activity. The suggested activities or assessments are not intended to be prescriptive, exhaustive, or sequential; they simply demonstrate how specific content can be used to help students learn the skills described in the standards. They are designed to generate evidence of student understanding and give teachers ideas for developing their own activities and assessments. Teachers should use, refine, and/or augment these activities, as desired, in order to ensure that they will have addressed all the standards intended for the unit and, in the aggregate, for the year. Reading foundations. To help kindergarten through second-grade students master the skills necessary to become strong readers, Great Minds offers a consolidated pacing guide of instructional goals for the teaching of the CCSS reading Foundational Skills. Additional resources. These are links to lesson plans, activities, related background information, author interviews, and other instructional materials for teachers from a variety of resources, including the National Endowment for the Humanities and ReadWriteThink. The standards that could be addressed by each additional resource are cited at the end of each description. Terminology. These are concepts and terms that students will encounter—often for the first time—over the course of the unit. The list is not comprehensive; it is meant to highlight terms that either are particular to the unit, are introduced there, or that play a large role in the work or content of the unit. These terms and concepts are usually implied by the standards, but not always made explicit in them. Interdisciplinary connections. This is a section included only in our curriculum for the elementary grades. Here we very broadly list the content areas the unit covers and then suggest

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East Atlanta Charter School Petition   

opportunities for “making interdisciplinary connections” from the curriculum to other subjects, including history, civics, geography, and the arts. This section may be particularly helpful EACS teachers, who will each teach multiple subjects. Sample Lesson Plan. One unit in each grade includes a supplementary document that outlines a possible sequence of lessons, using one or more suggested unit texts to meet focus standards. These sample lessons include guidance for differentiated instruction. Standards Checklist. Each grade includes a standards checklist that indicates which standards are covered in which unit—providing teachers an overview of standards coverage for the entire school year. THE WHEATLEY PORTFOLIO LEAVES THE CHOICE OF TEXTS TO EACS TEACHERS, WHILE ALIGNING WITH COMMON CORE RECOMMENDATIONS Many of the texts listed as exemplars in the CCSS Appendix B are included in the Great Minds Wheatley Portfolio. These texts take priority in the Great Minds units and indeed shape unit themes. Like the exemplar texts themselves, the additional texts suggested in our curriculum include literary works and informational texts that have stood the test of time, as well as excellent contemporary titles. The suggested texts include novels, short stories, poetry, essays, speeches, memoirs, biographies, autobiographies, fables, folk tales, and mythology. Teachers will find texts written by authors of wide-ranging diversity: young and old, living and dead, male and female, American and international. In the early grades, the Wheatley Portfolio prioritizes students’ exposure to traditional stories and poetry, Mother Goose rhymes, and award-winning fiction and nonfiction chosen for quality of writing and relevance to themes. They also emphasize concepts of print, phonological awareness, phonics, and text reading fluency. In upper elementary grades, students read a variety of fiction and nonfiction on science and history topics, as well as diverse selections of classic and contemporary literature. Along the way, the Wheatley Portfolio highlights numerous points of connection with history, science, and the arts. c. Identify materials/programs that the school plans to obtain/purchase to support the stated curriculum. East Atlanta Charter School will obtain copies of the Wheatley curriculum (see appendix for a copy of Wheatley). East Atlanta Charter School will obtain copies of the Eureka curriculum (see appendix for a copy of Eureka). East Atlanta Charter School will obtain copies of the Santillana Science curriculum. East Atlanta Charter School will purchase licenses for MAP testing. In addition to the content from Eureka Math, Wheatley Portfolio, and Engage NY, East Atlanta Charter School will supply classrooms with an abundant number of authentic texts and instructional books, in both English and Spanish. Both our Spanish- and English-language Our instructional books will be aligned with Common Core. We have identified as a likely source for books Santillana USA, a part of Grupo Santillana, the largest educational publisher in the Spanish-speaking world. Santillana offers comprehensive instruction solutions to the K-12 educational community. Santillana USA offers world-class Spanish literature and a wide range of instructional materials and services appropriate for use within the Common Core. The Common Core challenges students, teachers, and school systems to become world-class readers, writers, and thinkers. If we are to meet the challenge, instruction needs to shift away from finding the right answer

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East Atlanta Charter School Petition   

choice and defining words, toward using text evidence to support a position, inform others, or solve a real-world problem. High levels of literary analysis require that students and teachers examine high-quality authentic literature. Instructional materials published by Santillana USA are standards based and research based. We have identified its Spanish language arts Spanish-speaker programs, Yabisi K–6 as an appropriate series for EACS students. The Español Yabisí K–6 Spanish language arts program completely aligns to the ELA Georgia Common Core State Standards. It also integrates technology with literacy, vocabulary development, writing, phonics and phonemic awareness, and language mechanics progressive skills development. Santillana USA’s Spanish programs are designed to help students communicate in all modes of expression -listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills- to ensure students use the language effectively. The goal is to develop literacy skills through culturally authentic fiction and nonfiction selections and readers, and to create meaningful cultural and content-area connections. This focus on developing language, literacy, and content knowledge in all dimensions of language allows for the alignment of Santillana’s content to the Georgia Common Core, which shares the same focus and the same strands. d.

Describe the educational innovations that will be implemented.

East Atlanta Charter School will maximize student achievement by instructing students in a fully dual-language immersion setting. This instruction will focus on equipping students with communication skills (both oral and written) in both English and Spanish. East Atlanta Charter School will be the only fully dual immersion bilingual school in DeKalb County in which all students receive 50% of their instruction in English and 50% of their instruction in Spanish. e.

Provide a clear explanation of how the innovations will increase student achievement.

Extensive research indicates that dual-language immersion programs lead to increased student achievement, cognitive development, and creativity. (See Exhibit 5). In the article “Foreign Languages and the Achievement Gap,” the Joint National Committee For Languages (JNCL) and the National Council For Languages And International Studies (NCLIS) state, “Dual Language Immersion, where students learn academic subjects in English and another language, offers a positive and powerful approach to closing achievement gaps for African-Americans and students of low socioeconomic status.” The JNCL and NCLIS also write that the state of North Carolina has seen dramatic achievement gains from low socioeconomic students through their implementation of dual immersion instruction (see Appendix-029): North Carolina’s data specifically show that:

f.



3 rd and 4th grade African American students in immersion score between ½ and 1 full year ahead of other African American students, in English reading;



5 th through 8th graders score between ¾ and 2 years ahead of their peers in English reading.



When compared to the overall statewide scores, African American children in immersion close the achievement gap (compared to the overall performance statewide) by the 8th grade. Describe why the innovations are appropriate for this unique school.

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East Atlanta Charter School Petition   

East Atlanta Charter School will be the only school in DeKalb County that regularly assesses Spanish proficiency and that includes Spanish proficiency performance objectives as part of its academic goals. Since we are a fully immersion school, it is vital that we maintain strict assessment timelines and procedures to ensure that our students are on track for obtaining mastery. Therefore, with our outlined testing schedule, using assessments recommended by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages, we will be able to regularly track our students’ Spanish language proficiency through both oral and written measures. Our Spanish proficiency objectives are unique in DeKalb. The other DeKalb immersion programs have not established specific school-wide goals by which to measure students’ progress toward mastery of a second language. g. Describe the anticipated teacher-to-student ratios and the rationale for maintaining these ratios. Please describe your intended class sizes, including the minimum and maximum number of students. Be sure to explain the source of any additional funding necessary if the class sizes are smaller than those set forth in the SBOE Class Size Rule 160-5-1-.08. East Atlanta Charter School will have a 22:1 or better student to teacher ratio in each classroom. The purpose for maintaining these ratios is to ensure that students are obtaining and retaining mastery in all subject areas, particularly both English and Spanish language acquisition and communication skills. The minimum number of students in a classroom will be 20 (with the exception of potential resource or self-contained Special Education classes) and the maximum number of students in a classroom will be 23. Additional funding will be obtained through external grants and donations. h. If this is a charter high school, describe how the charter high school will determine that a student has satisfied the requirements for high school graduation, including the credits or units to be earned and the completion credentials to be awarded. N/A. East Atlanta Charter School shall not be a high school. 5. What are the school’s plans for educating special populations? (Reciting the requirements of law and rule is not sufficient) Please review the answers to questions 5, 6, and 9, written below, to see East Atlanta Charter School’s plans for educating ELL, Special Education, and Gifted students. 6. Describe methods, strategies and/or programs for meeting the needs of students identified as gifted and talented. Include any diagnostic methods or instruments that will be used to identify and assess those students. East Atlanta Charter School will meet the needs of all students, included those who are gifted and talented. We recognize the importance of providing additional enrichment opportunities, above and beyond the standard curricular opportunities, for students who exhibit gifted capacity in certain areas. Students will be identified and referred for evaluation via the referral process outlined by the Georgia Department of Education. Students who are referred for gifted evaluation will be diagnosed for gifted services via the eligibility criteria put forth by the Georgia Department of Education and will be in compliance with all laws and regulations. Children must qualify for the gifted program through one of two processes as follows:

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East Atlanta Charter School Petition   

Process A (Must meet each of the criteria--Mental Ability and Achievement) Mental Ability

Achievement

K – 2nd: 99th percentile on composite or full scale score of a standardized test of mental ability

K – 5th: 90th percentile (or higher), on total reading, total math or total battery score of a standardized achievement test

3rd – 5th: 96th percentile (or higher) on composite or full scale score of a standardized test of mental ability

A superior rating (numerical score of 90 or better on scale of 1-100) on a student generated product or performance as evaluated by a panel of three or more qualified evaluators

Process B (Must meet 3 of 4 criteria) Mental Ability

Achievement

Creativity

Motivation

96th percentile (or higher)

90th percentile on total

90th percentile (or

90th percentile (or

by age on a composite or

reading, total math or

higher) on the total higher) on a

full scale score or

total battery score of a

battery of a

appropriate component

standardized

standardized test of characteristics

score of a standardized test

achievement test creativity

of mental ability

OR OR

standardized

rating scale (motivational) OR

gen

A superior rating 90th percentile (or

superior rating

(numerical score higher) on a of 90

(numerical score of

or better on scale of 1-

standardized

at least 90 on scale

100) on a student

creativity

of 1-100) on a

erated product or

characteristics struc

tured

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East Atlanta Charter School Petition   

performance

as evaluated by a panel of

rating scale OR evalua

three or more qualified evalua

observation/ tion of student generated

tors

products and/or performances as evaluated by a panel of three or more qualified evaluators

OR superior rating

Grade point average

(numerical score of of at least 3.5 on a at least 90 on a

4.0 scale, using an

scale of 1-100) on a

average of core

structured observation/

grades over the

evaluation of

previous two school

creative products and/or performance

years

East Atlanta Charter School will utilize the following assessments to measure students’ aptitude in the aforementioned areas: 1. Mental Ability: Naglieri Nonverbal Ability Test®–Second Edition (NNAT®–2). The Naglieri Nonverbal Ability Test (second edition)—NNAT2 is the chosen ability measure for East Atlanta Charter School for grades K-5 because it uses progressive matrices to allow for a culturally neutral evaluation of students’ nonverbal reasoning and general problem-solving ability, regardless of the individual student’s primary language, education, culture or socioeconomic background. We will also provide the WISC-IV as an alternative. 2. Achievement: Students can qualify in this category based on results on MAP reading and math scores. 3. Creativity: Torrance® Tests of Creative Thinking (TTCT) 4. Motivation: The Gifted Rating Scale-Motivation subset Although all children will be engaged in challenging learning opportunities at East Atlanta Charter School, students who qualify for the gifted program will be given additional opportunities to excel and demonstrate expertise in their specific areas of strength. Such 33

East Atlanta Charter School Petition   

projects will require advanced skills in relation to projects such students might encounter in the typical learning environment. In all grades, students will be pulled for gifted segments using a resource model in which students are pulled for at least 225 minutes per week out of the general education setting into a more rigorous classroom environment with a certified gifted education teacher. For example, students who are in a gifted math segment will attend math class in a different classroom environment than their homeroom peers. Students will receive opportunities for bolstering critical and creative thinking skills, as well as affective and reasoning skills. Additionally, projects in the gifted program will be geared toward providing students with opportunities to apply their knowledge to real world issues and challenges, and will promote decision-making and higher order thinking skills. 7. Describe how the charter school will provide state and federally mandated services for students with disabilities. Include any diagnostic methods or instruments that will be used to identify and assess those students. East Atlanta Charter School will comply with all special education laws and regulations, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act and the IDEA. Through the implementation of a Student Support Team, East Atlanta Charter School will ensure that students suspected of having a disability will be screened, monitored, and assessed. East Atlanta Charter School will implement the Response to Intervention (“RTI”) process and allow students to appropriately matriculate through the various RTI steps. Curriculum-based measures from DIBELS, Fountas and Pinnell, and easyCBM will set the benchmark for the RTI model, as well as percentiles romt he Common Core MAP. Individual student growth will be continually assessed through strategic, skilltargeted monitoring, and progress monitoring. Curriculum-based measures will be consistently used for various assessment purposes at East Atlanta Charter School because they allow educators to directly and continually assess basic skills. Additionally, DIBELS and easyCBM provide data collection and analysis tools that will help guide instructional decision making. In the event that a student completes the final step in the RTI process without significant growth being obtained, the student will be referred to the special education and educational psychology department for initial hearing and vision screenings and initial achievement and ability psychological assessments. Any student found to have a disability will be provided with an Individual Education Plan (“IEP”) that will outline specific goals and objectives, as well as FTE percentages of special education services that should be received, and the specific environment in which services should be received (such as inclusion, resource, or selfcontained). The IEP will be implemented as it is written, and all accommodations and modifications will be shared with both general education and special education teachers serving such students. East Atlanta Charter School will always default to placing students in the Least Restrictive Environment allowable for that child’s specific disability and needs. Most students with disabilities will be able to be served in an inclusion classroom or a mixed model of partial inclusion and partial resource settings. In the event that a child should be best served in a self-contained or other higher restrictive placement, provisions will be made to provide such placements. For students entering East Atlanta Charter School with an existing IEP, all goals and objectives, services, and placements will be followed as is federally mandated. East Atlanta Charter School will work diligently to remediate students who qualify for special education placements. The goal is to eventually return students to a complete general education setting or a progressively less restrictive environment with the strategies necessary

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East Atlanta Charter School Petition   

for being successful. EACS will implement research-based, direct instruction and intervention curricula. For example, we plan to use Fountas and Pinnell Leveled Literacy Intervention, Foundations (for grades K-3), and Wilson Reading System (for grades 4-5) to remediate reading and spelling difficulties, and Scott Foresman focusMath Intensive Intervention for math. Students will be continually assessed, monitored, and re-evaluated for eligibility as mandated by the Individual Education Plan. East Atlanta Charter School understands the importance of having a competent, experienced, certified special education department to address the needs of students with disabilities. Special education staff will be contracted or hired as needed, based on the population of students requiring services, and their placement in the Least Restrictive Environment continuum. For students who are low performing and do not qualify for special education services, but qualify for a less restrictive amount of intervention under Section 504, a Section 504 team will be in place. East Atlanta Charter School will provide tutoring outside of the school day and Early Intervention Program (EIP) services as necessary for students as well. All teachers will follow the appropriate modifications and/or accommodations outlined in each student’s IEP. Each student with an IEP will have a special education teacher/case manager who will be responsible for sharing written documentation of such modifications and accommodations with each qualifying student’s general education teachers (including specials teachers). Teachers will be expected to differentiate and utilized baseline and progress monitoring assessments to plan targeted small group and individual lessons, giving disabled students access to curricular content that will improve their skills and assist them in transitioning out of the special education program or into a less restrictive special education model. In summary, East Atlanta Charter School agrees to the following guidelines: East Atlanta Charter School will: 

Establish a Student Support Team (SST) in accordance with state guidelines and local school board policies and use DCSD forms for SST.



Establish a Section 504 team in accordance with state guidelines and local school board policies and use DCSD forms for Section 504.



Handle all discipline issues regarding Section 504 students in accordance with federal regulations, state guidelines, and local school board policies including the Code of Student Conduct.



Participate in workshops, in-service and/or trainings offered by DCSD for persons serving as SST/Section 504 chairpersons and Exceptional Children staff.



Comply with Section 504 by providing the appropriate accommodations and equipment.



Immediately notify the DCSS Director of Charter Schools upon receipt of a complaint made by a parent/guardian or student concerning Section 504 and/or Individuals with Disabilities in Education Act, furnish a copy of such complaint and cooperate fully in the investigation, defense and resolution of such complaint.



Hire or contract certified special education teachers to provide services to eligible students.

East Atlanta Charter School acknowledges that the DCSD will:

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East Atlanta Charter School Petition    

Provide professional development training for the SST.



Provide professional development training for the Section 504 team.



Provide technical/consultative assistance to charter schools requested by the charter school.



Conduct Compliance Reviews of all charter schools to ensure that students with disabilities are provided a Free Appropriate Public Education.



Approve and assign all administrative student placements for students that the district determines cannot be served appropriately in their charter schools through the Office of Student Assignment.

In the event of a parent/guardian or student complaint concerning Section 504 and/or the Individuals with Disabilities Act, East Atlanta Charter School will immediately notify the DCSD Director of Charter Schools and furnish a copy of such complaint and cooperate fully in the investigation, defense, and resolution of such complaint. 8. Describe methods, strategies and/or programs for students receiving supplemental education services. These services should be provided pursuant to SBOE Rule 160-4-5-.03 and the Elementary and Secondary Education Act/No Child Left Behind. Pursuant to SBOE Rule 160-4-5-.03 and No Child Left Behind (NCLB), East Atlanta Charter School will provide Supplemental Education Services (SES) for students in need of such support due to not making adequate achievement progress as measured by criterion referenced and standardized assessments. East Atlanta Charter School will post a Request for Proposals for approved SES providers in both math and reading/language arts, and will subcontract such providers to provide SES services. The budget is reflective of these services. 9. Describe methods, strategies and/or programs for meeting the needs of students at-risk of academic failures through remediation. Include any diagnostic methods or instruments that will be used to identify and assess those students who are performing below grade level as well as the processes/programs/tools to be used in providing them with remedial instruction. These services should be provided pursuant to SBOE Rule 160-4-5-.01 and NCLB. East Atlanta Charter School will follow all requirements of SBOE Rule 160-4-5-.01 as well as all related state and federal laws regarding the identification and implementation of remedial services for students who qualify for such services. Through continuous, authentic, formative and summative assessments, East Atlanta Charter School will monitor the progress of all students and immediately put plans in place to remediate students at risk of academic failure. The tools used to monitor and track student progress in specific skill areas will be curriculum-based measurement by DIBELS, Fountas and Pinnels, and easyCBM. Students qualifying for the Remedial Education Program (REP) based on state requirements and guidelines will be placed in the appropriate number of REP segments as determined by the Student Support Team. 10. Describe how the charter school will provide state and federally mandated services for English Language Learners (ESOL). Include any diagnostic methods or instruments that will be used to identify and assess those students, including:

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East Atlanta Charter School Petition   

a. A description of the special language instructional program to be provided to ELLs that is designed to teach English, as well as general curriculum and who on staff will coordinate this effort. b. A provision indicating that ELL students will not be excluded from curricular and extracurricular activities in school because of the inability to speak and understand the language of instruction. c. Appropriate evaluative standards for measuring the linguistic and academic progress of ELL students, including program exit criteria. The percentage used to calculate the ELL FTE in East Atlanta Charter School’s budget was the same percentage as the percent of ELL students in the DeKalb County School District for FY 2012. This percentage is approximately 2%. The most common first language of ELL students in DeKalb Country is Spanish. East Atlanta Charter School will use the WIDA-ACCESS Placement Test (W-APT), the English language proficiency screener to incoming students who may be designated as English language learners. This assessment guides programmatic placement decisions such as identification and placement of students who are ELLs. All services will be provided for English Language Learners in accordance with all applicable Federal and State laws, rules, and regulations. A significant benefit of the dual-language immersion model is that it is also a federal and state approved instructional method for English Language Learners. Thus, students who qualify as English Language Learners can remain in the standard curricular program with their peers while receiving instruction appropriate to bolstering English language proficiency. For our ELL students who are native speakers of Spanish, gaining language and literacy skills in Spanish will bolster their ability to become proficient speakers and users of the English language, as it provides them with a framework from which to make comparisons and analyses. Further, these students will benefit tremendously from maintaining their heritage language and increasing their level of Spanish speaking, reading, and writing. Heritage language speakers who are able to continue using and improving their heritage language at school realize important economic gains as adults, as well as increased self-esteem and cultural pride. No student will never be excluded from curricular and extracurricular activities at East Atlanta Charter School because of the inability to speak and understand the language of instruction. In fact, ELL students at East Atlanta Charter School will be valuable members of our community, with the Spanish speakers serving as a resource and model to their native English-speaking peers. Proficiency in multiple languages will be celebrated and highly regarded among every member of East Atlanta Charter School. Due to the nature of the dual-language immersion instructional model, ELL students will be assessed using the same formative and summative assessments in the language domain as their native English speaking peers, the oral and written language rubrics set forth by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages proficiency guideline rubrics. However, for ELL students, the objectives for second language proficiency as outlined in the goals and objectives portion of the charter application will refer not only to their Spanish proficiency but also to their English oral and written language proficiency, whereas native English speakers will only be working toward an advanced level of proficiency in Spanish.

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East Atlanta Charter School Petition   

By our very nature, all students at East Atlanta Charter School will be “Learners of Other Languages”. All children will be assessed continually in both Spanish and English at East Atlanta Charter School. In addition to this evaluation rubric, ELL students will be assessed annually each January using the ACCESS ESL proficiency assessment. Results from ACCESS will inform student growth and guide decision making in the ELL program. Scores will be sent to the DCSD. In summary, East Atlanta Charter School will utilize a variety of resources for curricular materials for all language learning assessments. We will identify assessment tools in Spanish that are aligned to the proficiency guidelines set forth by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (see Exhibit 12). East Atlanta Charter School will use these proficiency guidelines to set benchmarks for oral and written second language proficiency (both for Spanish and for English as a second language) for all students. The ACCESS assessment will be used as a standardized measure of students’ English proficiency each January. Results from the ACCESS testing will be provided to the DCSD. East Atlanta Charter School acknowledges receipt and understanding of all notes contained in the petition application regarding the professional development and other services that will be provided by DeKalb County Schools. 11. List all proposed extracurricular activities or other auxiliary educational activities along with the grade levels in which these activities will be offered. Please list and describe the partnerships the school has developed to offer extracurricular activities (ex: chorus, band, sports, clubs, art). This information should explain who the partner organization is, at which location the activity will be offered, and any charges associated with providing these activities. Please provide copies of contracts or correspondence setting forth the terms of the partnership. East Atlanta Charter School will offer a variety of extracurricular and auxiliary educational activities. Children in all grades may participate in activities such as studio or dramatic art, or vocal and/or instrumental music, at least 2 days per week. All students will have daily PE and daily recess. One of the goals for the extracurricular and auxiliary educational activities will be to provide structured and unstructured opportunities for students to speak Spanish in varied circumstances which are reflective of real life experiences and encourage authentic spontaneous production of language. In recognition of the high percentage of South DeKalb families who do not have a parent or other caregiver at home during the typical workday, East Atlanta Charter School will provide enriching, high-quality before and after school care, likely via subcontract with one or more auxiliary and enrichment vendors of such services. Prior to school opening, the governing board will create a before and after school committee. The committee will be responsible for submitting an RFP to subcontract vendors in the areas of overall afterschool enrichment and management of after school activities, as well as specified vendors such as those specializing in martial arts, dance, science, technology, and sports. All vendors will be required to provide a sliding scale for families who cannot afford the full price of services. All activities will occur onsite to facilitate the participation of all students. 12. Which of the specific actions in the academic plan require a waiver of state law, rule, or guidelines? Although you will be granted a broad flexibility waiver if you are granted a charter, please demonstrate why a charter is necessary for this school by providing examples of significant

38

East Atlanta Charter School Petition   

components of your academic plan for which you need a waiver. Please also identify the specific waivers that are required to allow the implementation of those components. East Atlanta Charter School acknowledges that it is subject to the control and management of the DCSD Board of Education and that the school is expected to abide by and enforce the general rules and regulations governing all public schools to support the safety, welfare, and educational success of all students. EACS seeks a broad flexibility exemption per O.C.G.A 20-2-2065(a) in order to provide an education program tailored to the needs of EACS students. Because the school seeks to provide an environment and education program unlike anything currently offered in the state, it is critical that school leadership and the board have the flexibility to waive regulations that could prohibit maximum impact of the school program, even if they are not deemed critical to the model at this time. The particular sections of Title 20 of the Official Code of Georgia and other regulations outlined below are included in this broad flexibility exemption. The identification of these specific sections is in no way intended to replace the broad flexibility exemption, but simply to set forth specific examples that may be of particular importance to the school. Sections of Title 20 not listed herein are still considered to be waived under the broad flexibility exemption as permissible by law as part of the request for a broad flexibility waiver. EACS will comply with all the requirements of the Single Statewide Accountability System and will meet or exceed the performance-based goals included in the charter through its use of an innovative model. A broad flexibility waiver will enable school leaders and the board to make swift decisions around programmatic elements in order to meet the unique needs of students enrolled. Examples of how the broad flexibility waiver may be used to meet and exceed the performance goals outlined herein include the following:     

Paraprofessional services may be provided by a university partner (such as a representative of GSU’s CULTR), rather than by a staff member who is hired with the title of paraprofessional. A vendor who provides a competitive quote for services to the school because of their mission-alignment may not be a preferred vendor for DCSD. The staffing model may need to be adjusted annually to accommodate the needs of students as dictated by their IEPs. Staff who are certified in ELA may be asked to provide math remediation to a small group of students during an RTI period in order to accommodate small groupings and create a seamless staff support model for each student. The local board for the school will be charged with a number of responsibilities that may fall to the district in traditional schools, providing local control over the operation of the school. Examples include designation of and participation in a local grievance policy for stakeholders, organization and procurement of benefits for staff, creation of a salary scale, and oversight of the board in fiscal and operational decisions.

There are a number of waivers the school may require in its opening years and will not require in subsequent years, and vice versa. For this reason, the broad flexibility waiver best equips the school’s leadership to make real-time decisions in the best interest of students in the school and school community, while maintaining the integrity and spirit of the regulations. IFCB-R Field Trips

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As an independent charter school, EACS seeks maximum flexibility with regard to scheduling and coordinating its fieldtrips to best serve the needs of its students. The school will honor the spirit of this regulation by only scheduling learning trips aligned to content standards within school hours and will ensure all trips scheduled are planned with clearly aligned learning outcomes. IHEA-R Make-up work by students EACS seeks maximum flexibility to design and implement its own strategies with regard to make up work to best accommodate the learning needs of each student. All students will be required to make up work for classes missed; however, the nature and timing of the make up work will be determined by each teacher in accordance with the needs of each student. IKI-R Lesson Plans EACS seeks maximum flexibility with regard to the development of lesson plans to align this process and appropriate templates with the methodology being implemented. State Board to Prescribe Textbooks – O.G.C.A. 20-2-1010 and Electronic Format of Textbooks, O.C.G.A. Section 20-2-1015 and SBE Rule 160-4-4-.10(k). EACS intends to choose and offer textbooks that may not be on the state approved list, such as the Santillana Yabisi science books. The state has not evaluated Spanish texts for immersion (rather than for middle and high school traditional foreign language study). All curricula at EACS will be aligned to the CCGPS. Personnel Required- School Size— SBE Rule 160-5-1-.22 EACS seeks to waive requirements around personnel required and school size as the staffing configuration will be aligned to the needs of the students enrolled. Limited Public School Choice – SBE Rule 160-5-4-.09 As a public charter school, EACS seeks to be excluded from any rules related to limited public school choice and transportation. EACS should also not be subject to any transfer decisions by the local board of education as EACS is a school of choice and will enroll students as accepted by lottery (or first-come, first-served as described in the enrollment section). Values and Character Education— SBE Rule 160-4-2.33 EACS seeks to waive any requirements to follow a character education program outside its choosing. The unique population targeted for enrollment will be served by the individualized approach, which will support academic and personal growth. The curriculum that may be delivered to bolster character and personal development will be selected by the school leader and staff to ensure the curriculum and/or materials best align with the needs of the student population. Therefore, EACS does not want to be required to use other programs that might not reflect its values or practices. Course Listings—SBE Rule 160-4-2.20 As a public charter school, EACS seeks maximum flexibility in designing its courses that best meet the needs of its students and school culture. It is not the intent of this waiver to neglect to offer state recognized courses, but rather to allow EACS the freedom to create interdisciplinary coursework. KIB-R Special Interest Materials Distribution

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EACS seeks flexibility with regard to distribution of such materials. As EACS intends to be a research resource for GSU’s CULTR (only to the extent that it will not interfere with instruction), this flexibility, combined with appropriate oversight, will facilitate the development of successful tools and strategies that can be generated through such research (with informed parental consent). KNBA-R Complaints about Instructional Materials As EACS will be governed independently through its own board of directors, EACS maintains a grievance policy for all stakeholders that directs concerns to the board as the final authority in the process. As such, stakeholders are instructed to direct any and all grievances, including those about instructional materials, to the proper channels as identified in the school’s grievance policy. IFA-R, IFA-R(1), IFA-R(2) Instructional Materials Media and Equipment EACS seeks to use its own media for instruction and intends to utilize different media to ensure the use of authentic Spanish materials that align with the CCGPS. III. ORGANIZATIONAL OBJECTIVES, PLANS, AND WAIVERS 13. State the school’s Organizational Goals and Measures. a. School organizational performance objectives should reflect where the school envisions itself organizationally at the end of the charter term. b. Objectives should include areas such as: governing board training, student and teacher retention, and student, parent and teacher satisfaction. East Atlanta Charter School has created the following observable and measureable objectives aligned to the school’s mission. The mission of East Atlanta Charter School is to nurture a community of young scholars who will not only achieve very high standardized test scores, but who will also be uncommonly adept at expressing themselves effectively in myriad settings. Our curriculum will focus on the liberal arts, and we will utilize evidence-based best practices in education and classroom management. East Atlanta Charter School teachers will engage and inspire children through highly interactive and student-centered lessons that harness the intense curiosity innate to children. GOAL 1: Support the development of each child’s curiosity, confidence, creativity, and communication skills. Fostering creativity, imagination, and a love of learning is central to the mission of East Atlanta Charter School. Each child will participate in a rich, interdisciplinary curriculum that focuses on inquiry, discovery, and building community. Our faculty will foster the development of motivated, independent and confident learners by encouraging all students to think critically and act responsibly. To achieve our ambitious academic goals, a safe and inclusive environment is essential. Each child must feel intrinsically valued by his or her teachers and peers. We will treat each other with respect and affection as we learn to work collaboratively. Communication skills are the foundation of society, so reading, writing, and public speaking are central elements of the curriculum. Love of listening and telling stories expands quickly to fluency in reading and writing. Children have much to share within the community, and these basic skills allow them to reach out to the world. Through the exploration of literature in 41

East Atlanta Charter School Petition   

English and Spanish, students develop more sophisticated reading skills that are ultimately mirrored in their writing. Elementary school is a time of explosive growth. East Atlanta Charter School students will also undertake the formal study of math and discovery-based science, exploring a problem both to seek a solution and to understand the principles it demonstrates. Math instruction will focus on understanding the fundamental principles of mathematics, logical thinking, and problem solving. Opportunities to speak and share information will complement our students’ Spanish language acquisition and support beginning computer skills as children learn to use technology. Class projects will frequently involve a mix of traditional disciplines, using math, science, reading, writing, and art, allowing children to see the interconnectedness of knowledge. Music, theater, visual arts, and physical education will add depth and richness to our interdisciplinary studies while expanding the creativity of our students and offering more settings in which to develop robust Spanish vocabulary and skills. The world is changing at a fantastic speed, and we cannot know yet what careers today’s children will have decades from now. To be prepared for an unknowable future requires the ability to problem-solve, adapt, and communicate in workplaces and environments that are increasingly complex. Creativity creates jobs, drives economic growth, provides answers to societal needs, and maximizes human potential. Creativity is critically valuable, but research indicates it’s been declining significantly on a global scale over the last 20 years. This decline is evident in the challenges children are facing in school, life and work. A 2011 report in the highly-regarded Creativity Research Journal states that “children have become less… expressive… energetic… humorous… imaginative… unconventional… less likely to see things from a different angle.” http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10400419.2011.627805#.VTMzOyHBzRY We believe in the vision for creative education as envisioned by Tom Peter in the book Reimagine. Specifically, we believe that school should recognize that learning is natural, that a love of learning is normal, and that real learning is passionate learning, and we believe that a school’s curriculum should value questions above answers, creativity above fact regurgitation, individuality above uniformity, and excellence above standardized performance. We will respect our faculty and grant them the autonomy to do their jobs as the creative individuals they are, and for the creative individuals in their charge. When students are being creative in the classroom they are likely to: 

Question and challenge. Creative students are curious, and question and challenge the limits.



Make connections and see relationships. Creative students think laterally and make associations between things that are not usually connected.



Envision what might be. They imagine, see possibilities, ask “what if?” and picture alternatives, and look at things from different viewpoints.



Explore ideas and options. Creative students play with ideas, try alternatives and fresh approaches, keep open minds and modify their ideas to achieve creative results.



Reflect critically on ideas, actions and outcomes. They review progress, invite and use feedback, criticize constructively and make perceptive observations.

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Creative teaching may be defined in two ways: firstly, teaching creatively and secondly, teaching for creativity. Teaching creatively might be described as teachers using imaginative approaches to make learning more interesting, engaging, exciting, and effective. Teaching for creativity might best be described as using forms of teaching that are intended to develop students own creative thinking and behavior. At EACS, teachers will encourage student creativity in the following ways: 

Create an inviting and exciting classroom environment.



Provide an abundant supply of interesting and useful materials and resources.



Create a classroom climate where students feel mistakes are acceptable and risk taking is encouraged, and appropriate noise, mess and autonomy are accepted.

Curiosity is the key to learning, yet fostering children’s curiosity can be difficult in a traditional classroom environment. Curiosity is an essential ingredient in wanting to learn. Especially for schools that serve students from socioeconomic backgrounds that are traditionally underperforming, notions about curiosity research or development of inquisitiveness could be seen as well-intentioned but superfluous. What our struggling students need, educational policy seems to say, is more time in class, more assessment, and more-pervasive testing. Yet, school achievement and success in other arenas do not take place in a vacuum. The influence of psychological factors such as motivation, self-concept, and readiness to take on challenges has attracted the attention of researchers. Typically, children enter the middle-childhood years very optimistic about their ability to master a wide array of tasks and activities, including their schoolwork, with little relation to their actual level of skill. By age 10, however, children have typically become far less optimistic about their own capabilities, and there is a much stronger relation between their self-ratings and their actual performance. Their ability self-concepts and their expectations for success tend to decline over the elementary school years. For school subjects, this decline in self-confidence and motivation continues through adolescence, when it may lead students to avoid challenging courses or to drop out of school altogether. As some children pass through middle-childhood, experiencing more frustration and becoming more pessimistic about their abilities, they may shy away from activities in which they are unlikely to succeed at first. Under usual circumstances in the American culture, children come to conclude that failure is an indication of their incompetence, not a condition that can be modified by learning or practicing. If they believe they lack innate ability (especially intellectual, athletic, or artistic ability), children understandably become discouraged and withdraw from the activity or task. By contrast, if children view abilities as subject to incremental improvement, they understand that they can become more competent with practice and development. When it is coupled with appropriate help from supportive adults, a belief that ability can be cultivated reduces children’s frustration with failure and allows them to maintain high expectations for future success. Expectations of success help to explain children’s willingness to engage in tasks and to strive to succeed, but engagement is also influenced by children’s interests and by the belief that a given task is important. Especially valuable are school activities and courses that provide children with (1) the opportunity to learn without continual social comparison norms, (2) chances to control their own learning, (3) respect for all participants, and (4) strong emotional and social support. Thus, EACS will endeavor to foster an environment for each child that helps the child preserve and grow self-confidence.

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East Atlanta Charter School Petition   

Objectives: Curiosity Every fifth grade student will complete an individual, self-designed, interdisciplinary project that will culminate in a public presentation in front of fellow students, families, and community members. Each fifth grader’s project presentation should demonstrate the grade level speaking benchmarks established by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, detailed below. Communication Skills In addition to the benchmarks EACS has established as academic goals in literacy and writing, we will provide meaningful, regular opportunities for all students to develop and demonstrate age-appropriate oral communication skills in both Spanish and English. We aim for each child to achieve all of the speaking development goals established by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, in both Spanish and English, by the end of each school year. For those who do not begin EACS in kindergarten or first grade, we aim for them to hit their grade level communication goals in Spanish by the end of their third academic year, and the goals of the grade level below their own by the end of their second academic year. For example, a new third grader should achieve the third grade speaking goals by the end of the year in English, while not being expected to meet those same goals yet in Spanish. Thus, she should be able to participate in group discussions using specialized vocabulary during social studies class taught in English, but she would not yet be expected to contribute effectively to class discussions in science class taught in Spanish. By the end of her second year –fourth grade--, she should achieve the fourth grade goals in English, and the third grade goals in Spanish. Finally, by the end of her third year –fifth grade--, she should achieve the grade level speaking goals in both languages. Each teacher will formally evaluate each of their students’ achievement in oral communication at least twice per year. Thus, each child will receive at least four evaluations per year (two for English speaking, and two for Spanish). Kindergarten: 

Be understood by most people.



Answer simple "yes/no" questions.



Answer open-ended questions (e.g., "What did you have for lunch today?").



Retell a story or talk about an event.



Participate appropriately in conversations.



Show interest in and start conversations.

First Grade: 

Be easily understood.



Answer more complex "yes/no" questions.



Tell and retell stories and events in a logical order.



Express ideas with a variety of complete sentences.



Use most parts of speech (grammar) correctly.



Ask and respond to "wh" questions (who, what, where, when, why).



Stay on topic and take turns in conversation.



Give directions.

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East Atlanta Charter School Petition   



Start conversations.

Second Grade: 

Be easily understood.



Answer more complex "yes/no" questions.



Ask and answer "wh" questions (e.g., who, what, where, when, why).



Use increasingly complex sentence structures.



Clarify and explain words and ideas.



Give directions with 3-4 steps.



Use oral language to inform, to persuade, and to entertain.



Stay on topic, take turns, and use appropriate eye contact during conversation.



Open and close conversation appropriately.

Third Grade: 

Speak clearly with an appropriate voice.



Ask and respond to questions.



Participate in conversations and group discussions.



Use subject-related vocabulary.



Stay on topic, use appropriate eye contact, and take turns in conversation.



Summarize a story accurately.



Explain what has been learned.

Fourth Grade: 

Use words appropriately in conversation.



Use language effectively for a variety of purposes.



Understand some figurative language (e.g., "the forest stretched across").



Participate in group discussions.



Give accurate directions to others.



Summarize and restate ideas.



Organize information for clarity.



Use subject area information and vocabulary (e.g., social studies) for learning.



Make effective oral presentations

Fifth Grade: 

Make planned oral presentations appropriate to the audience.



Maintain eye contact and use gestures, facial expressions, and appropriate voice during group presentations.



Participate in class discussions across subject areas. 45

East Atlanta Charter School Petition   



Summarize main points.



Report about information gathered in group activities.

GOAL 2: Maximize student retention through building strong relationships with students’ families Becoming highly proficient in Spanish through a dual language immersion school model is a long and complex process, one that takes an average child about four to six years. Thus, it is ideal for students to begin as early as possible and remain in the program through its highest grade level (in our case, fifth grade). Thus, we seek to retain all entering students through their completion of fifth grade. Given normal attrition caused by relocation and other factors, which particularly affects students who live in poverty, we aspire to retain at least 90% of our students from year to year (excluding our fifth graders headed to middle school). In order to retain our students, we will work extremely closely with families, starting with widespread public engagement to inform McNair Cluster families about dual language immersion, its many benefits, and its potential challenges. Based on initial outreach, we expect to find many eager families excited to enroll their children. Each year, after the lottery, we will host open houses, question and answer sessions, and special events where families accepted into EACS but not yet enrolled can meet with faculty and current EACS families, to learn more about the school and immersion education, empowering them make an informed decision about whether they want their children to attend. Just as the three DeKalb immersion programs do now, we will ask each parent to voluntarily commit to continuing to send their child to EACS through the fifth grade. Though the commitment will be non-binding, we hope that it will encourage families to make a careful decision that they are prepared to stick with. Once children begin attending EACS, we will make a robust, ongoing effort to communicate with parents about their children’s education. Our teachers will reach out regularly and will also make themselves available for meetings and correspondence with parents and guardians, even beyond the regularly scheduled parent-teacher conferences and class-wide letters home with general updates and information. We strive to make each EACS parent an advocate for his or her child’s school experience and journey toward Spanish proficiency. Rather than rely on surveys to tell us whether our children’s families are satisfied with EACS, we will make sure each teacher has a personal relationship with each of their students’ families. Each EACS teacher will be required to document his or her spoken or written communication with each child’s family at least once per month. Thus, every EACS family will have at least two personal contacts at the school (their child’s English-language and Spanish-language teachers), in addition to access to a responsive Principal. The teachers will provide individualized feedback to each family about their child on a regular basis, and will also proactively find out whether the family has any questions or concerns about the child’s school experience. In cases where children are struggling in school due to challenges at home, we will seek to connect the family to resources and wraparound services that will improve the home environment. GOAL 3: Attract, retain, and develop highly capable instructional staff in order to facilitate academic excellence and high-level Spanish proficiency for all students.

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Measure 1: All instructional staff will participate in data-driven, mandatory, frequent professional development. Each year, all teaching staff will attend a summer professional develop workshop designed specifically for immersion educators. Teachers will be required to earn 2 PLU (20 contact hours) per calendar year. Our faculty will participate in the annual summer workshops delivered by GSU’s Center for Urban Language Teaching and Research, a partner of East Atlanta Charter School. Measure 2: Teacher retention rates, as measured by retention of teachers whom were offered a contract for the next academic year, will be at least 80% annually. Measure 3: Our teachers will be highly qualified and continually improving their own skills. Those teachers who do not have Georgia teacher certification will proceed with all necessary steps to obtain it in the most rapid manner possible. Measure 4: Our Spanish teacher candidates who are not native speakers of Spanish will be required to pass ACTFL proficiency testing to show that they test at the Advanced level. Measure 5: Faculty and staff hiring will be made with a preference given to Spanish speakers, and all faculty and staff will project a positive and enthusiastic attitude about communicating in Spanish. To reinforce the children’s use of Spanish in a variety of settings, all faculty and staff who are able will communicate with students in Spanish, including in the hallways, at lunch, at recess, and in specials such as art and physical education. GOAL 4: The school will establish and implement sound and accurate financial management practices in all areas of business operations, including GAAP (Generally Accepted Accounting Principles) and other best practices. Measure 1: In each year of the charter, yearly balance sheets will demonstrate that the Charter School maintains adequate cash on hand and is able to consistently meet financing commitments. Measure 2: As a result of an annual financial audit, the school will obtain an unqualified opinion as to whether the financial statements are presented fairly, in all material respects, with respect to financial position, results of operations, and cash flows in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States. 14. What specific actions will the school take to achieve its organizational performance objectives? a. Describe the organizational innovations that will be implemented during the proposed charter term. Please see above where the Goals are combined with specific Measures, and explanations about why they are promising innovations for our school model. b. Provide a clear explanation of how the innovations will increase organizational effectiveness. Our innovations go to the heart of our primary goal of preparing our students for lifelong success through high-level proficiency in Spanish and sophisticated communication skills. c. Describe why the innovations are appropriate for this unique school.

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East Atlanta Charter School Petition   

Our innovations support East Atlanta Charter School’s goal to retain students through fifth grade so that they maximize their acquisition of Spanish. 15. Which of the specific actions in the organizational plan require a waiver of state law, rule, or guidelines? a. Although you will be granted a broad flexibility waiver if you are granted a charter, please demonstrate why you need a charter by providing examples of a significant component of your organizational plan for which you need a waiver. Please also identify the waivers that are required to allow the implementation of that component. East Atlanta Charter School will comply with all federal, state, and local laws, policies, procedures, and requirements unless specifically waived in the charter. East Atlanta Charter School will use the flexibility provided by the broad flexibility waiver to meet or exceed the performance-based goals included in the approved charter, including but not limited to raising student achievement as follows: As required by O.C.G.A. § 20-2-2065(b), East Atlanta Charter School shall be:

(1) A public, nonsectarian, nonreligious, nonprofit school that is not home-based,

provided that a charter school's nonprofit status shall not prevent the school from contracting for the services of a for-profit entity;

(2) Subject to the control and management of the DCSS school board, as provided in the charter and in a manner consistent with the Constitution;

(3) Organized and operated as a nonprofit corporation under the laws of this state; (4) Subject to all federal, state, and local rules, regulations, court orders, and statutes

relating to civil rights (including, but not limited to, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, and the Americans with Disabilities Act); insurance; the protection of the physical health and safety of school students, employees, and visitors; conflicting interest transactions; and the prevention of unlawful conduct;

(5) Subject to all laws relating to unlawful conduct in or near a public school; (7) Subject to an annual financial audit conducted by the state auditor or, if specified in the charter, by an independent certified public accountant licensed in this state; Subject to the provisions of Part 3 of Article 2 of Chapter 14 of this title, and such provisions shall apply with respect to charter schools whose charters are granted or renewed on or after July 1, 2000;

(8) Subject to all reporting requirements of Code § 20-2-160, subsection (e) of Code § 202-161, Code § 20-2-320, and Code § 20-2-740;

(9) Subject to the requirement that it shall not charge tuition or fees to its students except as may be authorized for local boards by Code § 20-2-133; and

(10) Subject to the provisions of Code § 20-2-1050 requiring a brief period of quiet reflection.

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East Atlanta Charter School Petition   

East Atlanta Charter School requests the following waivers in order to enable the flexibility to set policies and procedures that allow it to meet the rigorous goals set forth in this charter application: 2. Article 7: TEACHERS AND OTHER SCHOOL PERSONNEL PART 7. TERMINATION, SUSPENSION, NONRENEWAL, DEMOTION, OR REPRIMAND O.C.G.A. § 20-2-940 through § 20-2-947. East Atlanta Charter School requests a waiver from these sections because we wish to allow the governing board and executive leadership team to define all policies and procedures surrounding the termination, suspension, nonrenewal, demotion, or reprimand of teachers and other school personnel. O.C.G.A. § 20-2-390 through 20-2-396 – Borrowing for Operating Expenses. East Atlanta Charter School requests waivers from these sections to allow the school to have the autonomy needed to effectively manage all borrowed funds as deemed necessary to meet the mission, goals, and objectives of the charter. O.C.G.A. § 20-2-300 – Implementation and Funding Authorized. In an effort to allocate all time toward meeting the mission, goals, and objectives of the charter, East Atlanta Charter School seeks a waiver from this section to the extent that any proposed programs may contradict or interfere with the delivery of programming and curriculum established at East Atlanta Charter School. O.C.G.A. § 20-2-230 through 20-2-232 Staff Development. East Atlanta Charter School seeks a waiver from this part only to the extent that it requires East Atlanta Charter School staff to participate in staff development programs that are not consistent with the unique dual immersion, communications-focused curriculum at East Atlanta Charter School. East Atlanta Charter School will offer professional development that is tailored to the unique mission of East Atlanta Charter School including but not limited to professional development offered in other languages, and professional development focused on language acquisition, such as that offered through our partner GSU Center of Urban Language Teaching and Research. East Atlanta Charter School will evaluate and make revisions to East Atlanta Charter School’s curriculum as needed and will offer annual professional development opportunities consistent with East Atlanta Charter School’s unique academic model. This waiver will help East Atlanta Charter School achieve its mission by ensuring that all staff development is relevant and beneficial to teachers delivering East Atlanta Charter School’s unique curriculum. This waiver is not inconsistent with the purpose of this section because the staff will still engage in professional development in support of our mission and instruction of state standards. O.C.G.A. § 20-2-290 Organization of Schools. East Atlanta Charter School seeks a waiver from this part because state law has precedent over school board policy and a school’s charter, and East Atlanta Charter School believes it is important to make sure that nothing in this section of the law would allow an organization or reorganization of East Atlanta Charter School by the board of education of DCSS that is incongruent with this charter. This waiver will help East Atlanta Charter School achieve its performance goals by ensuring that the organization of East Atlanta Charter School is not unilaterally changed by the local school system.

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O.C.G.A. § 20-2-850-853 and 20-2-880-925 Personnel Policies and Benefits. East Atlanta Charter School seeks a waiver from these parts to the extent they are inconsistent with any personnel policies and benefits programs that may be established from time to time for Charter School personnel. East Atlanta Charter School does not waive the right of any of its personnel to participate in any benefits program that may be available to them as public school teachers. This waiver will help East Atlanta Charter School achieve its performance goals by ensuring that East Atlanta Charter School is able to hire teachers who are best suited to meet the needs of the school’s student body and to effectively deliver the school’s curriculum. Specifically, East Atlanta Charter School may need flexibility in the benefits offered by East Atlanta Charter School in order to provide benefits that are beneficial for all of East Atlanta Charter School’s staff, including those who are not citizens or lawful permanent residents of the United States, but who are instead nonimmigrants with limited work authorization. This waiver is not inconsistent with the purpose of these parts because the charter school will develop personnel policies and a benefits package that are competitive with those offered by the DCSS. School climate management program; model codes of behavior and discipline— O.C.G.A. Section 20-2-155 EACS plans to use the DCSD code of conduct, but will be developing model codes of behavior and discipline aligned with the school culture. Assistant Principals and Secretaries—O.C.G.A 20-1-185 EACS seeks flexibility in determining the type and number of personnel for roles such as Assistant Principal and/or Secretary. As a public charter school, EACS requests the freedom to determine the leadership and support structure that best fits the needs of its school’s culture. EACS intends to designate leadership support roles and assistants on staff, but requests flexibility in title, role, and salary level for these positions. Certification Requirement of Hired Professionals - O.C.G.A. Section 20-2-200, Professional Standards Commission Rule 505-2-.09 1(a) and DeKalb County Schools Policy GBBD for Professional Certification EACS seeks the flexibility to employ or otherwise engage non-certified personnel in the event that the individual is determined by EACS to be the best individual to fulfill the role. Teachers may be deemed qualified to teach and provide support in content and enrichment areas for which they do not retain specific Georgia certification, while they may have appropriate certification in another jurisdiction.

Appropriate Organizations to Provide In-Service or Continuing Education – O.C.G.A. 20-2-201(c) EACS will provide robust continuing professional development and training, but the school has and is forming partnerships with experts who may be better positioned to provide this training and support. For this reason, EACS does not seek a waiver necessarily from the requirement of additional training, but rather from the subsection (c) pertaining to the development of these inservice opportunities by local areas of administration and “other appropriate organizations.” The unique needs of our school model may best be met through staff training and support that are provided by entities and partners who may not currently be in network with state and district providers.

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Conditions of Employment— O.C.G.A. Section 20-2-210 and Teacher Contracts – O.C.G.A. Section 20-2-211(a), 20-2-211(b), and 20-2-211(c). Teacher Salary Schedules and Increases – O.C.G.A. Section 20-2-212 through 20-2-212.6 and SBE Rules 160-5-2-.04 and 160-5-2-.05 EACS seeks to waive the state’s requirements related to annual performance evaluation, as it will rely on its own model to evaluate staff. This model is aligned to the mission and best practices of the model EACS provides. Further, EACS seeks to waive requirements related to salaries in order to retain flexibility to determine its own salary schedule and compensation for its employees. EACS further seeks flexibility to ensure merit-based increases as funding allows. EACS intends to offer a highly supportive and rewarding work environment with a specialized focus that will attract the best candidates for the positions available. Conditions of Employment – O.C.G.A. Section 20-2-850-853 and Grounds and Procedure for Terminating or Suspending Contract of Employment— O.C.G.A. Section 20-2-940 EACS will manage and administer its own human resource policies related to employment, sick leave, and benefits. Further, EACS employees will be at-will employees. School Administrator – O.C.G.A. Section 20-2-942(1.1) relating to school administrators EACS seeks to waive any rules and regulations relating to school administrators as it will recruit, hire, and retain the best principal it deems necessary to realize the mission of the school. GBRA-R(1) Professional Personnel Personal Leaves and Absences As EACS will hire and retain its own staff, it will develop its own policies with regard to leave and absences that otherwise conform to the law and are in the best interest of the instructional program being delivered. EC-R(0) Equipment and Supplies Management As EACS will utilize its own equipment and supplies, it seeks maximum flexibility in the purchase, management and disposal of its materials to ensure all equipment and supplies best meet the needs of the EACS students and staff. KG-R Allowable Use of School Facilities EACS seeks flexibility in the guidelines related to the use of school facilities recognizing that the use of the building cannot conflict with the mission of the school and its primary objective of educating its student body. O.C.G.A. Sections 20-2-240 through 20-2-242 – Powers and Duties of the State Board, State Superintendent, and Local school systems. East Atlanta Charter School seeks a waiver only from the below listed State Board Rules, which were promulgated pursuant to O.C.G.A. § 20-2-240: Rule 160-5-1-.36 – Local School Board Governance. East Atlanta Charter School seeks a waiver of this rule as its Board of Directors will govern East Atlanta Charter School. However, East Atlanta Charter School will fully comply with all of the ethics and open record and meetings requirements as stated in this State Board Rule. Rule 160-5-2-.05 Experience for Salary Purposes. East Atlanta Charter School seeks a waiver of the above listed State Board Rules in order to give it the flexibility in the staffing and training of its teachers and other staff members to carry out its stated mission and goals as described in this petition. This flexibility in making personnel decisions will allow East Atlanta 51

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Charter School to ensure that the maximum amount funding is allocated specifically to the instruction of its students. Despite asking for a waiver of these State Rules, East Atlanta Charter School will work with and utilize any existing DeKalb County School System resources made available to East Atlanta Charter School in order to abide by the intent of these Rules. East Atlanta Charter School further seeks a waiver from any actions that may be required or authorized by either the State School Superintendent or the Local school system that would be inconstant with this charter or with the waivers allowed by O.C.G.A. § 20-2-2065 that are incorporated into this charter petition. These waivers will help East Atlanta Charter School achieve its performance goals by ensuring that the rules, regulations, policies, and procedures that apply to the charter school and the duties of various persons or entities to enforce certain rules, regulations, policies, and procedures are consistent with the charter including the waivers. These waivers are not inconsistent with the purpose of these sections because the rules, regulations, policies, and procedures that apply to East Atlanta Charter School will still be enforceable by the appropriate entities at appropriate times as set out in the charter and in the Charter Schools Act of 1998. DeKalb County School District Requested Waivers: East Atlanta Charter School is requesting waivers of specific DCSD Policies in an effort to effectively meet its mission. Such waivers exist in the categories of personnel, curriculum, school calendar, instruction, and transportation as follows: Policy CI-R(1): Administrative Intern Program East Atlanta Charter School seeks a waiver of the above listed Policy in order to give East Atlanta Charter School the flexibility in the staffing and training of its teachers and other staff members to carry out its stated mission and goals as described in this petition. This flexibility in defining hourly requirement and processes will ensure best use of funding allocated for our students. Policy CJ: Administrative Consultants East Atlanta Charter School seeks a waiver of Section F & G in order to give East Atlanta Charter School the flexibility in the staffing and training of its teachers and other staff members to carry out its stated mission and goals as described in this petition. This flexibility in making personnel decisions will allow East Atlanta Charter School to ensure that the maximum amount funding is allocated specifically to the instruction of our students. Code G: Personnel Policy GAD: Professional Learning Opportunities Policy GAD-R(1): Professional Learning Opportunities East Atlanta Charter School requests a waiver from this section, only for systemwide professional development opportunities that would not be relevant or related to the mission, curriculum, and philosophy of East Atlanta Charter School. Policy GBD: Professional Personnel Hiring Policy GBI: Professional Personnel Evaluation

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Policy GBKA: Professional Personnel Lay-Off Policy GBO: Professional Personnel Resignation Policy GBRI: Professional Personnel Personal Leaves and Absences East Atlanta Charter School requests waivers from the above policies as the school and its governing board wish to exercise the right to full authority regarding all personnel matters Policy GBR: Professional Personnel Working Conditions (All Sections) All matters regarding attendances/absences shall remain in the authority of East Atlanta Charter School’s school leader and the school’s governing board. East Atlanta Charter School requests a waiver from this policy to keep these matters within the jurisdiction of the school and the governing board as opposed to the DeKalb County School System superintendent. Policy GCRB-R: Classified Personnel Time Schedules Policy GDRB-R: Paraprofessional Time Schedules Policy GBRB: Professional Personnel Time Schedules East Atlanta Charter School requests a waiver from these policies, as the school may follow an academic calendar different from the DeKalb County School System. However, East Atlanta Charter School will maintain a July 1 through June 30 fiscal year and calendar year for all 12month personnel. Policy GBBA: Professional Personnel Qualifications and Duties (Section I. – Teachers) EACS requests a waiver from the policy for section I only, which states the minimum requirements for teachers including a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college. East Atlanta Charter School is requesting this waiver to allow for the hiring of international, qualified teachers who have graduated from college programs but who have been determined by a reputable U.S. credentials evaluation firm (such as Trustforte) to have earned the foreign equivalent of a U.S. bachelor’s or higher degree. Policy GBB: Professional Personnel Positions East Atlanta Charter School requests waivers from the above policies as the school and its governing board wish to exercise the right to full authority regarding all personnel matters Policy GCA: Classified Personnel Compensation Guides and Contracts Policy GCA-R: Classified Personnel Compensation Guides and Contracts Policy GBA: Professional Personnel Compensation Guides and Contracts (Sections B – Review of Compensation Plan & C – Levels of Compensation) Policy GBA-R: Professional Personnel Compensation Guides and Contracts East Atlanta Charter School seeks a waiver of the above listed policies and regulations for classified and professional staff in order to give East Atlanta Charter School the flexibility in the compensation plan and salary schedule, including but not limited to, salary increases based on merit and performance, and compensation packages that may include salary plus other benefits such as housing for international teachers. East Atlanta Charter School has created a salary scale for teachers. East Atlanta Charter School requests waivers from the above policies as the school and its governing board wish to exercise the right to full authority regarding all personnel matters. Policy GCRD: Classified Personnel Overtime Pay 53

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East Atlanta Charter School requests a waiver from this policy to the extent that overtime pay must be approved by the Superintendent. Overtime will be approved by the school leader via the governing board which has governance over our school’s budget. Code I: Instructional Program Policy IA: Instructional Program Philosophy Policy IA-R: Instructional Program Philosophy Policy IC: Curriculum Development Policy ICFA: Curriculum Guides and Course Outlines Policy IDA: Basic Program Policy IDA-R(1): Basic Program Policy IDA-R(3): Basic Program Policy IDA-R(4): Basic Program Policy IDA-R(5): Basic Program Policy IDA-R(6): Basic Program East Atlanta Charter School requests waivers from the above policies and regulations so as to appropriately exercise the autonomy to employ the school’s prescribed curricular framework, such as the scope and sequence. Teachers at East Atlanta Charter School will follow East Atlanta Charter School curriculum as opposed to that prescribed by the DeKalb County School District. East Atlanta Charter School’s instructional philosophy is tied to its mission and vision, and although it aligns to that of the DeKalb County School District, it is a philosophy independent of the DCSD. East Atlanta Charter School’s curricular framework is included in this petition, including a detailed scope and sequence with alignment to the GA Performance Standards and Common Core Standards. Policy IDAC: Kindergarten East Atlanta Charter School requests a waiver from this policy to the extent that it requires funding to be obtained from the school district. East Atlanta Charter School may eventually pursue a state-approved pre-kindergarten program that could potentially be funded by other entities and/or community partners. Should East Atlanta Charter School pursue a Pre-K program, the program would still be licensed and approved by the appropriate state entity, Bright from the Start: GA Department of Early Care and Learning. Policy IDCA: Summer School Policy IDCA-R: Summer School Policy IDE: Co-Curricular Activities Policy IDE-R: Co-Curricular Activities Policy IDF: Interscholastic Activities East Atlanta Charter School requests a waiver from all of the above policies, as East Atlanta Charter School may organize its own summer school, co-curricular, and interscholastic activities in alignment with the schools vision, mission, and specific curricular model. The School Leader will be directly responsible for the oversight of policies and procedures surrounding these activities.

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Policy IED: Scheduling for Instruction Policy IED-R: Scheduling for Instruction East Atlanta Charter School requests a waiver from the above policies and regulations, only to the extent to which an off-site instructional activity could potentially be deemed noninstructional by the DeKalb County School District. East Atlanta Charter School wishes to exercise the right to define “instructional activities” in a way that will be meaningful and supportive of the mission and vision of East Atlanta Charter School, as described in this petition. Policy IFA: Instructional Materials East Atlanta Charter School requests a waiver from the above policies so that it may effectively implement the instructional strategies outlined in Section III of this application. Policy IFBGB: Web Pages (Section III) East Atlanta Charter School will manage its own website and social media messaging. Such content will remain professional and standards will remain in alignment with the District’s Web Publishing and Compliance Guidelines. Policy IFCB-R: Field Trips and Excursions East Atlanta Charter School wishes to waive this policy, only to the extent that it requests no educational field trips during the last two weeks of school. East Atlanta Charter School does not wish to adopt this policy, as there may be valuable field trip opportunities (tied to the school’s curriculum and mission) that become available during the last two weeks of school. Additionally, East Atlanta Charter School wishes to waive that section of the above policy requiring approval from the Executive Director of Transportation for all field trips, as the school may secure the use of other modes of transportation such as a charter bus. All other facets of this policy will be adhered to such as student supervision and parent permission. Policy IH: Student Achievement East Atlanta Charter School requests a waiver from this policy, as the school will employ methods for measuring and reporting (i.e. progress reports and report cards) student achievement data different from those methods employed by the DCSD in an effort to increase student achievement and meet the mission of East Atlanta Charter School, as described in this petition. Policy IHA: Grading Systems While we plan to use a letter grade grading system, we seek the flexibility to incorporate progress metrics, teacher narratives, portfolios, and foreign language assessments. Policy IHB: Homework East Atlanta Charter School requests a waiver from this policy to the extent that such policy should ever contradict the instructional philosophy and mission of East Atlanta Charter School. Homework at East Atlanta Charter School will be meaningful, developmentally appropriate, and tied to students’ instructional day. It is our intention never to assign homework that would require our students’ parents to have any Spanish proficiency whatsoever, as we consider the families’ role to reinforce the child’s home language. Policy IJ: Evaluation of Instructional Program East Atlanta Charter School requests a waiver from this policy as the school wishes to utilize its school leadership and faculty to evaluate the effectiveness of the instructional program. East Atlanta Charter School will review the effectiveness of its instructional program annually, taking

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student achievement data (including Spanish proficiency assessment data) and parent and teacher feedback into account. Policy IKI: Lesson Plans East Atlanta Charter School requests waivers from the above policy and regulation to the extent that lesson plans must be aligned to the DCSD-approved curriculum. Teachers at East Atlanta Charter School will align lesson plans to East Atlanta Charter School’s curriculum, as included in Section III of this application, which is aligned to the Common Core Standards and Georgia Performance Standards. Policy JCD: Student Conduct East Atlanta Charter School is requesting waivers of the JCD Policy, specifically those sections allowing for corporal punishment. East Atlanta Charter School administration will never use corporal punishment under any circumstances. Policy JCDAF: Use of Electronic Devices by Students East Atlanta Charter School is requesting a waiver of to the extent that East Atlanta Charter School students may use electronic devices with educational merit, such as iPads, as part of their instructional time. While highly interactive, live, in-person communication is the gold standard for language acquisition, we may wish to integrate high-tech learning tools in a careful and limited way. Policy MFB: Student Teaching and Internships East Atlanta Charter School requests a waiver from this policy to the extent that internships should not be subject to approval by the Department of Professional Learning. East Atlanta Charter School board and administrative team will approve all student teaching and internship placements.

IV. GOVERNANCE A key characteristic of charter schools is that an autonomous governing board makes decisions on behalf of the school. It is imperative that all governing boards demonstrate substantial autonomy, decision-making authority and capacity. 16. Describe how an autonomous governing board will make decisions for the school. a.

Identify each member of the governing board; describe the composition of the governing board (number of members, skillsets to be represented, how members are/will be representative of the school and the community, etc.; describe how and when board members will be selected, and the terms that governing board members will serve. Briefly explain the recruitment plan of new members if vacancies occur.

According to our bylaws, East Atlanta Charter School’s governing board will be composed of five (5) to twenty (20) members of the community with broad and diverse backgrounds such as law, finance, elementary education, higher education, human resources, language acquisition, special 56

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education, marketing, fundraising, and business operations. Members with previous board experience will be sought. Prospective board members will be solicited by strategically placed announcements (Chamber of Commerce publications, etc.); nominations for board members will also be accepted. The board will have a governance committee that will oversee the process for selecting new board members. Prospective board members will attend an orientation/training session and complete a skill set inventory. The candidates which best fill the board vacancies based on a skills inventory will be nominated and elected by current board members to fill these vacancies. A three-year term length for governing board members will be set in the bylaws, and the expiration of individual terms will be staggered so that no more than two board members end their service at one time to prevent loss of foundational and institutional knowledge. The board will affirm renewals of consecutive terms. No board member shall serve more than three consecutive terms. Each board member will fill out, sign, and submit a Conflict of Interest Disclosure Statement on an annual basis. Handbooks will be provided to each new board member and will include a plan for rotation, succession, and transition as well as a clarification of roles of members of the board. No board member will be compensated for time served on the board, except as allowed for reasonable and actual expenses incurred in connection with performance of duties as necessary. The founding board will strategically transition to the governing board by carefully considering the skill sets of the founders based on skill set inventories. Those founders who wish to transition to the governing board may do so as long as the essential skill sets are covered. The founding directors will select the initial slate of governing board members based on the skills inventory and on covering the necessary skill sets for the governing board. Additional members for the governing board will be sought to satisfy the missing skill sets. Within the first year after East Atlanta Charter School has been approved by both the county and the state, the governing board will establish a clearly delegated strategic plan with a calendar of annual milestones. A calendar of major board decisions will be established during the first year of operations to show a timeline of all major activities of the year, including scheduled public board meetings. The founding board will meet the third Monday of every month. The governing board will continue that regular meeting schedule, which will be clearly communicated to all stakeholders. Protocol and policy will be established to ensure that all meetings are efficient and orderly and that all specified business is addressed. In accordance with the provisions of O.C.G.A. § 50-14-1, all meetings of the governing board will be open to the public unless a meeting meets the requirements mentioned in the law for a closed executive session. Any resolution, rule, regulation, or other official action adopted at a meeting which is not deemed open to the public will not be binding. Meeting locations, times, and dates will be posted in on the school’s website and in the school office in an area available to the public at least two weeks prior to any public meetings. The board will follow open meetings law for any special called or emergency meeting. Agendas and minutes for each open meeting will be made publically available on the school’s website. The board will set policy for an inclusive and transparent public comment process and will remind the public of the policy at each open meeting. In addition, East Atlanta Charter School will comply with all provisions of the Open Records Act (O.C.G.A. § 50-18-70), except in those

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cases where records are excluded by court order or by law are prohibited or specifically exempt from being open. All open records will be available for personal inspection by any citizen of the state of Georgia at a reasonable time and place and individuals in charge of those records cannot refuse this privilege to any citizen. Reasonable time, not to exceed three business days, shall be given to determine if requested records are considered open and to provide these open records to the requesting party. Upon request, records maintained by computer shall be made available where practical by electronic means. b.

Describe the governing board’s function, duties and role in the areas of budget, resource allocation, personnel decisions (primarily school leader selection, evaluation, and termination), establishing and monitoring the achievement of school improvement goals, curriculum and school operations.

Please find this information in complete detail in the Bylaws at Exhibit 16. c.

Please use the Governance matrix (found on the Charter School Division’s website) to illustrate the level of autonomy your Governing Board will have. Please note: This matrix will become part of your charter contract.

Charter School Governance Decision-Making Matrix East Atlanta Charter School (DeKalb): Personnel Decisions

Board Authority

Actual Board Authority and How and When it will be implemented

- Hire, support, manage, and assess the Principal. - Ensure that the Personnel Committee utilizes LKES leader keys to evaluate the school leader and leadership team. - Ensure ongoing professional development opportunities for the Principal. - Delegate management roles to the Principal. - Ratify all personnel decisions. - Ensure frequent and ongoing communication between the Board and the Principal, especially regarding the school’s educational and financial goals and personnel matters. - Develop a leadership succession plan. - Develop a grievance policy and act as an appeals board when necessary.

As soon as possible after approval of the charter, the Board will select a capable Principal. The Principal, with the advice and consent of the Board, will select initial staff. From that point forward, the Board will support the Principal and ensure that the leadership development and resources are available and adequate.

Financial Decisions & Resource Allocation

- Ensure responsible and ethical fiscal management of EACS assets. - Establish and monitor fiscal health indicators. - Hire an independent auditor. - Oversee the budget process and school investments. - Ensure effective organizational planning.

The Board holds all fiscal responsibility. Financial oversight will be shared by the full Board or a committee of the Board, but not by any individual member of the Board.

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Curriculum & Instruction Establishing & monitoring the achievement of school improvement goals

School Operations

d.

- Establish committees and delegate specific duties for proper resource allocation and management as necessary. - Develop a fundraising strategy and manage fundraising activities . - Select curriculum, including any changes in curriculum as needed to improve student achievement. - Hold Principal accountable for implementation and timeline of school improvement goals, evaluate success, and make revisions as needed. - Develop a curriculum and set measuring standards to ensure that the curriculum can satisfy school goals. - Ensure that the viability and effectiveness of the curriculum is monitored by a Board committee. - Develop an assessment structure and schedule. - Monitor local, state, and federal assessment scores and standards and EACS student performance against them . - Create bylaws for the Board and review them annually. - Create any policies which will impact the operation of the school. - Develop and implement a strategic plan. - Develop a viable and sustainable fiscal management plan. - Develop an engaging educational program. - Implement monitoring tools to measure student academic performance. - Ensure compliance with all legal and regulatory requirements. - Establish a fixed order of business for meetings to ensure that all appropriate business is discussed effectively.

The Board is responsible for ensuring that appropriate resources are available to meet the mission and goals of EACS. The Board will ensure that the Principal and faculty implement the selected curriculum and will oversee its ongoing use. The Board will work with school officials to ensure the improvement goals are met.

At least one day per quarter will be dedicated to review and discussion of the milestones of the strategic plan. Policies and bylaws will be established before the opening of the school and will be reviewed and edited once per calendar year. The board will establish an accountability plan to ensure that all fiscal, legal, and educational regulations and objectives are met.

Use this section to provide a narrative of your matrix, including anything in the matrix that requires further explanation or clarification.

As the governing body of East Atlanta Charter School, the board is not only charged with seeing the mission of the school fulfilled, but also holds the charter and is ultimately accountable for the school meeting and exceeding the goals as articulated herein. The board connects the school to the wider community, provides expertise to the organization, assists with fundraising, confers

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credibility on the school, oversees and supports the principal’s performance, and helps fulfill many governance functions including legal responsibilities, general oversight, planning and policy-making and fiduciary requirements. The board is legally and morally accountable for the health, vitality, and effectiveness of the school. Therefore, the board assures due diligence for the entire organization. e.

Describe your plan for ensuring that you maintain a diverse board with broad skillsets.

From our school’s origin as an idea developed by two mothers, one African American and one Caucasian, the founders of East Atlanta Charter School have been purposeful and intentional in recruiting Board members and advisors who are diverse in many senses, including but not limited to race, gender, socio-economic background, sexual orientation, linguistic background, and native country. What unites the Board is that each Board member offers substantial professional competency in a skillset that is necessary to our success, and each Board member is committed to the children of South DeKalb, with almost all members residing within the limits of the DeKalb County School District, and most of them within the McNair Cluster itself. The Board continues to seek to add new members to ensure that it reflects the demographics of the area and the needs and interests of the South DeKalb community. The founding board includes several lawyers, educators (both K-12 and university level), an accountant, multiple business owners, a federal government officer, and others, and the skills represented on the team are both broad and deep, from information technology to business consulting to grant writing to general fundraising to grassroots community activism. f.

Describe how and why governing board members may be removed.

Governing board members may resign by written notice to the board Chair or Vice Chair, with resignations being effective immediately or as outlined by the board member’s written notice. Governing board members will be expected to act in the best interests of the charter school. An individual governing board member may be removed for any reason including but not limited to the following as decided by the majority vote of the full governing board: absence from meetings without notice or just cause (the attendance record for each governing board member should be 75% or better, with anything lower being grounds for dismissal), not fulfilling duties as defined in the by-laws, not acting in accordance with the mission and vision statements of East Atlanta Charter School, and acting negligently or against the laws of the state of Georgia when representing East Atlanta Charter School. Please see the bylaws for complete information. g.

Georgia law now requires Charter Schools to provide initial training for newly approved charter school Governing Boards as well as annual governance training thereafter. Governance training should help build the capacity needed to make decisions in the above-mentioned areas. Trainers must be selected from a SBOE-approved list that ensures that the training covers certain SBOE requirements. Beyond those requirements, as a best practice, Charter Schools should also ensure that it selects a training program that covers areas of identified needs.

Upon approval of the petition, we will provide appropriate initial training for the entire governing Board, followed by annual governance training thereafter.

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h.

Describe your plan and timeline for securing a provider for your initial governance training as well as annual training thereafter. Include in this plan, areas of focus that are specific to your board and school. Provide a brief plan for continuous governance training, recruitment and retention of high quality governing board members.

As detailed in EACS’s bylaws and herein, the Nominating and Governance Committee is responsible for Board training. New directors will be identified by this committee in conjunction with the school community and encouraged to become involved in school governance through committee membership before being nominated for the Board. Once elected, the new director will be provided with an appropriate collection of best practices around board participation, information about the school and its mission, minutes from the most recent meetings, and other information helpful to new members. Each new director will meet with a member of the nominating committee to receive one-on-one training to support his or her effective participation on the Board. At its annual retreat, organized by the Vice Chair, the Board will initiate a self-evaluation process that will highlight key board priorities for the next year. Annual performance data provided by the principal that includes student assessment outcomes, staff and parental survey data, and key operational outcomes, will supplement this self-evaluation, providing a blueprint for the Nominating and Governance Committee’s training plan for the following year. Georgia State University’s Center for Urban Language Learning and Teaching has pledged to establish an agreement that one of the three CULTR Co-Directors will reside on the Board on a rotating basis allowing CULTR to provide ongoing professional advice and mentorship to the Board. Some founding board directors have participated in USDOE and Georgia Charter Schools Association webinars, and the Board Chair will make these opportunities available to all directors as they arise. Once this petition is approved, the Board will join the Georgia Charter Schools Association and avail themselves of their board training program. Additionally, the Board will consult with BoardOnTrack, a company that provides a guided program to optimize charter school boards. i.

Disclose any potential conflicts of interest and describe how the governing board will ensure that current and future board members avoid conflicts of interest.

EACS will continue to use the conflict of interest form required by DeKalb County and use this as a basis for evaluating areas of concern and conflict. As conflicts arise the standing board will evaluate the nature of and extent and work with a new potential board candidates, and jointly determine if these are insurmountable. If the conflict is for example financial in nature, EACS will provide guidelines for voting abstinence as necessary for a member. Evaluation of each board member, of available committees, and potential areas of conflict to prevent any exposure of liability will be the working goal of the board. EACS feels that full disclosure, an approach of regular governance training will allow for the board to maintain an active balance and diverse membership. j.

How will the governing board’s role uphold the school’s mission and vision? Please provide specific examples.

The governing board's role will uphold the school's mission and vision by using strategic thinking to develop intentional board practices that support a results-oriented approach to EACS's academic, fundraising, and organizational goals. As accomplished community leaders,

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our governing board members bring credibility to the school in the broader community and serve as its ambassadors. k.

How will the governing board evaluate the principal’s performance? This should include the assessment tool that will be used to determine effectiveness.

The Executive Committee is responsible for evaluating the principal annually. This committee will utilize a research-based rubric to measure teacher and principal effectiveness. l.

How will the governing board ensure effective organizational planning and financial stability? Please provide specific examples.

The board has developed a pragmatic budget poised for aggressive growth through grants, ensuring EACS's financial strength and sustainability. m.

How will parents, community members, or other interested parties be involved in the charter school’s governing board?

The governing board will have between five (5) and twenty (20) voting members available for community membership. There will also be non-voting advisory roles, and various committees which will provide options for parents and other parties to participate. The governing board will hold regular meetings open to the public, and encourage parental involvement and attendance where ever possible. n.

How will the school promote parental and staff involvement in school governance?

The school will promote a high functioning Parent Teacher Association to give parents an opportunity to actively participate in the governance of the school. This will help support classroom education and give more opportunities for both the teachers and parents to work towards a closer understanding and involvement in their students' and children's education. o.

How will the school communicate with students’ families?

The school will, in addition to sending notifications home with students as has been historical way teachers send notifications to parents and guardians, leverage technology to assist in providing clear and abundant communication with students' families. Items such as school activities, scheduled events, and plays will be available to parents via regular emails from the school, the school website, and appropriate social media. Homework assignments, and student performance or attendance related items will be made available to parents by way of the schools private and secured Learning Management System, Parent/Teacher classroom discussion boards, emails, or possibly via phone calls. The nature and extent may change as technologies grow but always with legal requirements (such as FERPA compliance) kept in mind. Please see III, 13, regarding our Goal to retain all students. 17. Grievance

s

a. What will be school leadership’s role in resolving teacher, parent and student grievances and other conflicts? Describe the rules and procedures concerning how the school will address grievances and complaints from students, parents, and teachers. The grievance policy should clearly articulate how individuals may present grievances, how those

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grievances will be reviewed, and who will undertake the task to review grievances, as well as the time frame for disposing of a grievance. Student/Parent Grievances Student/parent grievances will be addressed first at the school, with parents encouraged to communicate openly and frequently with staff through ongoing informal and formal measures initiated by the school. All parents will have access to each staff member’s email, and all emails will be responded to in a timely manner as a part of each staff member’s job requirement. Parents a re encouraged to visit the school site and all staff will make themselves available to confer with parents by appointment. If a parent is unable to resolve a grievance with the staff member or if the grievance involves school leadership, parents may schedule an appointment with the principal. An appointment to discuss a concern will be made promptly, and parents will be asked to communicate the nature of the concern and parties who should attend the conference when scheduling the appointment. Parents may bring representation to this appointment if they so desire. After the meeting with the principal, an official response (in print) to the grievance will be made by the principal within 5 business days. If the grievance is still unresolved after this step or if the grievance is with the board, parents will be able to contact the board chair to schedule an audience with the board. Upon communication of the grievance, the board chair will determine whether the grievance should be heard at the next regularly scheduled board meeting or in closed session before the next board meeting. Parents may also bring representation and/or witnesses to this appointment if they so desire. The board will make a decision regarding the grievance within 5 business days of the hearing, and the written decision will be submitted to the parents and any involved staff, as pertinent. The say of the board is considered the final say in the grievance. Staff Grievances Staff grievances will follow the same chain of command, starting with strong encouragement to resolve the grievance amongst the parties involved through informal measures. If the grievance cannot be resolved by the staff member’s manager, the matter will next be heard in a scheduled appointment with the principal. If the grievance is still unresolved after this step or if the grievance is with the board, the staff member will contact the board chair to schedule an audience with the board. Upon communication of the grievance, the board chair will determine whether the grievance should be heard at the next regularly scheduled board meeting or in closed session before the next board meeting. Staff members may also bring representation and/or witnesses to this appointment if they so desire. The board will make a decision regarding the grievance within 5 business days of the hearing, and the written decision will be submitted to the staff member and any other involved party, as pertinent. The say of the board is considered the final say in the grievance. General staff grievances will be aired and addressed through the two elected staff representatives on the board, who may be asked to recuse themselves from grievance hearings for other staff members. Under the whistleblower policy, staff members must report suspected fraud and dishonest conduct to the chair of the board or the chair of the board finance committee, who then have responsibility to investigate all reported violations.

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b. What will the governing board’s role be in resolving teacher, parent, and student grievances and other conflicts? This should include specific procedures and protocols for grievance resolution for each group. Describe the plan or method that the charter school’s governing board will utilize for resolving conflicts with the DeKalb County School District and/or Board of Education. Explain how conflicts will be addressed and resolved. Please see above. c. Describe the method that the governing board plans to utilize for resolving internal conflicts. The governing board will resolve internal conflicts by using good practices in managing conflict. The board will pay attention to good interpersonal communications, devoting time at the annual retreat to discuss good communication practices; operate with a strategic plan that helps to articulate goals, objectives, and outcomes that will reduce conflict over the meaning of the organizational mission, strategic choices, and priorities; keep clear the roles and responsibilities of individual directors and officers and the board’s role in relation to staff; receive professional development annual in conflict resolution at the annual meeting; establish a code of conduct for directors, setting rules on issues such as confidentiality, conflicts of interest, lobbying of fellow board members, and speaking with one voice; undergo annual performance evaluation; be mindful of gender and cultural differences; and celebrate agreements and new understandings in order to acknowledge the hard work that is involved in expressing and working through tough issues. 18. In the appendix, attach an official copy of the certificate of incorporation for the required Georgia nonprofit corporation from the Georgia Secretary of State, pursuant to O.C.G.A. § 20-22065(b)(4). The certificate of incorporation for East Atlanta Charter School, Inc., issued by the Georgia Secretary of State, can be found in the Appendix at Exhibit 18. 19. Provide a brief description for each governing board member that explains what role they will play on the board and why they were chosen to participate in the founding group. Attach the member résumés or curriculum vitas in the appendix. Governing board members were selected to comprise a balanced board of diverse skills that best benefit the founding and establishment of an organization. The founding board is comprised of: Loren Locke (Chair) practices immigration law at Seyfarth Shaw LLP. Loren previously served as diplomat in the U.S. Foreign Service, posted to the U.S. Consulate in Matamoros, Tamaulipas, Mexico. A graduate of the University of Richmond and William & Mary Law School, Loren experienced a year of language immersion herself as a high school exchange student in Meaux, France, and in college she studied abroad in both Argentina and Ecuador. Having worked very hard to learn Spanish and French as an adolescent and adult, Loren is raising her two children to be bilingual in English and Spanish from early childhood. Mijha Butcher Godfrey (Vice Chair) attended Wellesley College, where she majored in Urban Studies and Spanish. Mijha completed her JD at Yale Law School. Mijha’s legal experience includes corporate finance, real estate, fair housing, and community development. Mijha has worked as an affordable housing developer at the Atlanta Neighborhood Development

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Partnership, Inc. (ANDP). Since childhood, Mijha has studied the progress of African-American rights from the nation’s beginnings through the civil rights movement and beyond. She has served on the board of Georgia WIN List and as the President of Young Democrats of Atlanta. Mijha is a member of the bar in New York, New Jersey and Georgia. She lives in South DeKalb County with her husband and young daughter. Josh Bennett (Treasurer) has been an accountant since 2010 and is currently employed by Turner Broadcasting in the international live programming department. Josh brings to the table a solid foundation and understanding of accounting principles as well as the desire to have his children and other children in the community immersed in an innovative dual language charter school. Due to his ties with CNN Español and the Spanish speaking community, which he deals with in his day to day operations, he sees great value in obtaining the skills to speak to others in many countries all over the world. Josh has a deep desire to help his community obtain the skills and education that is necessary for the children to have a bright future. Josh is very committed to his community and is more than willing to help in fundraising activities to ensure the future of our innovative charter school. Jean Wilson-Stayton (Secretary) is the current Student Support Coordinator at KIPP STRIVE Academy in southwest Atlanta. She has five years of charter school experience and has worked in a variety of instructional roles within the KIPP network. Jean originally entered education as a corps member in the 2010 Teach for America Atlanta Corps. Jean graduated Magna Cum Laude from Davidson College with a Bachelor of Arts degree. Jean first became interested in East Atlanta Charter School because her research has taught her that dual language immersion schools are an effective method of closing the achievement gap and leading to bilingual proficiency. Kennisha Davis is a graduate of Southern University A&M College, and she is pursuing a Master’s degree in Public Affairs. Kennisha has worked for the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services for more than 7 years as an Immigration Services Officer. She is a DeKalb county resident and mother of two. Through her work she came to understand the value of a bilingual and bicultural education. She has since made it her passion to provide her children and others with an education that equips them to succeed on a global scale. Nickolas Downey is founder and CEO of Nead Werx, Inc., an Atlanta software company. Nead Werx was named the 2012 Georgia Tech Cooperative Employer of the year, and was also named one Atlanta's top 45 best and brightest companies to work for that same year. Nick is a ruling elder at Oakhurst Presbyterian Church, an active member of the Atlanta Technology Angels, and sits on the Board of Directors of several Atlanta companies and nonprofit organizations. Nick graduated from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 2002 with a Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering and lives in East Point with his wife Candi and their son. David Fuentes is the pastor of youth and families at Oakhurst Presbyterian Church in Decatur, Georgia. Prior to his work in the church, David worked for the Democratic Party of Georgia, where he was the top fundraiser for Grassroots Georgia two years in a row. He also worked as a campaign organizer. David has over ten years of experience working with youth and children in both the private and public sectors. He is drawn to Spanish immersion education because of his own Puerto Rican heritage. Jeremy Greenup has over eleven years’ experience as a human resources consultant in fields ranging from compensation, benefits, change management, and talent retention and evaluation. Prior to beginning his career in this field, he taught high school for three years in Japan and also

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taught at the undergraduate levels at Georgia State University and Georgia Perimeter College during his time as a graduate student. He has extensive non-profit board experience, having served on the Alumni Board of Oglethorpe University, as Board Treasurer for 50 Cents. Period and SPARK! Reproductive Justice Now and most recently as Board Secretary for Positive Impact Health Centers, one of the largest HIV/AIDS service clinics in the southeast. Dr. Jonathan T. Lyon is an associate professor of chemistry at Clayton State University. He received his BS in Chemistry at Michigan State University and his PhD in Chemistry at the University of Virginia. His doctoral thesis was titled “Infrared Spectroscopic and Theoretical Investigation of the Matrix-Isolated Reaction Products of Small Molecules with Laser-Ablated Transition and Actinide Metal Atoms.” Dr. Lyon was an Alexander von Humboldt Postdoctoral fellow at the Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society in Berlin, Germany before joining the faculty at Clayton State University. He is the author of over 40 scholarly publications. Dr. Lyon resides in DeKalb County with this family. Ryan Locke is a trial attorney at Locke Law Firm LLC and an adjunct professor of law at Emory University School of Law. In law school at the University of Georgia, Ryan represented children with disabilities who were not receiving a free and appropriate public education through the Special Education Clinic. Ryan has represented immigrant children seeking asylum in South Texas and, while a public defender, children charged with delinquencies in the Fulton County Juvenile Court. He has served on the State Bar’s Juvenile Law Committee. Ryan performs extensive pro bono and volunteer work, including representing charter schools in transactional matters and coaching Southwest DeKalb High School’s mock trial team since 2011. He lives in DeKalb County with his wife and children. David Spake is an IT professional with over 25 years of progressive experience in IT management, systems, networking, and solution architecture. He has five years specific experience in IT in educational institutions as a project manager, application designer, and implementation specialist for curriculum solutions. During his career he has implemented several CRM, ERP, HR, and Networking solutions. He has established help desk systems and managed employees throughout all levels technology environments. David has won competitive RFP awards in Higher Education IT, and he led the coordination, writing and submission of these responses. A lifelong foreign language learner himself, David has also taught English as a Second Language (ESL) both privately and in classrooms in Japan. A resume for each director can be found in the Appendix at Exhibit 17. 20. In the appendix, please provide the proposed charter school’s bylaws, pursuant to O.C.G.A. § 20-2-2065(b)(4). (All petitions must provide a copy of the by-laws in final form; no drafts.) Bylaws must reflect the charter school’s mission and non-profit status and should include: a. The method by which the board will be elected or appointed and removed, as well as the term of office for each member. At each annual meeting of the Board of Directors, the Directors shall select a slate of candidates for each vacancy to be presented to the Board and a candidate shall be selected for each vacancy by simple majority vote of the Board. Each candidate is then affirmed for election by a confirmation vote from parents and legal guardians then enrolled at EACS and all full-time employees of EACS. Should a candidate not be confirmed, the Board shall select another candidate to be presented for a confirmation vote in the same manner. Should three candidates

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not be confirmed, the Board shall select from the three prior candidates or shall select a fourth candidate to serve the term for the vacancy by simple majority vote. A Director may resign by submitting his or her resignation in writing to the Chair of the Board of Directors. A Director may be removed for cause at a meeting of Directors by an affirmative vote of two-thirds of the remaining Board of Directors. Directors being considered for removal shall receive at least two weeks’ notice of such proposed action and shall have the opportunity to address the Board regarding such action prior to any vote on such removal. If a Director becomes an impediment to EACS’s mission by failing to perform the Director’s duties, failing to perform the Director’s duties adequately, being disruptive in meetings of the Board of Directors or taking an action, whether or not in the Director’s official capacity, that is inconsistent with these Bylaws or the organizational mission of EACS, any Director may request a vote for removal of such Director and a vote shall be placed on the agenda for the next regularly-scheduled meeting of the Board of Directors. The Chair may, but is not required to, meet informally with the Director in question to counsel the Director about his or her performance before a removal vote is taken. Any vote for removal must be taken in person. No vote for removal of a Director may be taken by consent of the Directors, by proxy, or by telephone. Directors shall be elected for three year terms. Terms shall be staggered so that no more than 1/3 of the Board shall be up for election in any year, unless a vacancy(ies) needs to be filled. Director membership shall be limited to three consecutive three-year terms. Previous Directors shall be re-eligible for membership after a lapse of one year. b. The number of members to serve on the board after the charter school is authorized (the minimum required by DCSD is five), and identify any seats reserved for specific constituents. The Board of Directors shall consist of not less than five and not more than twenty natural persons over the age of 18. The Principal, chair of the parent organization, and teacher representatives as selected by the Board shall be ex officio directors. One seat shall be reserved as a seat for a co-Director of the Georgia State University Center for Urban Language Teaching and Research, as outlined in their letter of support. c. The responsibility and authority of the board for the policy and operations of the charter school. The Board of Directors shall have all powers and authority, as designated in the Charter, for the management of the business, property, and affairs of EACS, to do such lawful acts as it deems proper and appropriate to promote the objectives and purposes of EACS. The Board of Directors may, by general resolution, delegate to committees or to officers of EACSs such powers as it may see fit for specified periods of time. d. A list of committees of the governing board (which must include, at minimum, an executive, finance, and education/accountability committee). Executive Committee: Composed of the elected officers and volunteer standing committee chairs. The Executive Committee may act with the full power of the Board of Directors between meetings of the Board. All actions must be recorded and reported to the Board. All matters of

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policy must be referred to the Board for ratification. Annually evaluate in writing the performance of the principal. Development Committee: Raise funds through an Annual Capital Campaign, and other related efforts, to supplement the per-pupil funding received from the DeKalb County Board of Education. Ensure that all fundraising at school is vetted through the development committee. Curriculum and Instruction: Oversee the school’s progress toward meeting its academic goals. Facilities: Oversee and address issues relating to the maintenance and operations of the facility or facilities. Finance Committee: Review and recommend the annual budget for Board approval. Monitor budget compliance, all financial expenditures, and revenues and other financial issues throughout the year. Recommend financial policies to the Board. Work with the Business Operations Manager, Principal, and other staff to establish financial goals and policies. The Financial Committee Chair will, in collaboration with the Principal and Business Manager, prepare and present a report on current financial and operational performance at each Board meeting. The Treasurer shall be the chair of the Finance Committee. Grievance Committee: the Board of Directors shall establish a Grievance Committee comprised of both parents and teachers to make non-binding recommendations to the Board of Directors concerning the disposition of complaints. The Grievance Committee shall have four members who will serve one year terms, with one member designated as chairperson the other committee members. Committee members shall be appointed each year at the first Board of Directors meeting following the annual meeting. Members may serve no more than two consecutive terms on the committee. Nominating and Governance Committee: Develop the Board policies, procedures, and training. Establish hiring, grievance, transfer, evaluation, and other personnel procedures. Provide support for the Principal in the implementation of these policies. Conduct, and report to the Board on, an annual performance review of the Principals. Announce openings, accept nominations for, review candidates, and make recommendation(s) to the full Board candidates for open Board positions. Obtain school community input on nominations prior to selecting and recommending Board members for election by the Board. The Vice Chair shall be the chair of the Nominating and Governance Committee. e. The calendar for board meetings, providing for a minimum of ten meetings per year. The Board will hold an annual meeting for the election of Directors and Officers and such other business as may come before the meeting shall be held in April of each year. Written notice shall be given not less than 30 days nor more than 60 days of the time, place, and purposes of the meeting. The meeting shall be held at the principal location of EACS or such other place as shall be specified in the meeting notice. In addition to the Annual Meeting, Regular meetings of the Board of Directors shall be according to a calendar adopted at the annual meeting, except in the month of the Annual Meeting, and at such other times as the Board may, from time to time, determine. The Board must hold a minimum of ten meetings per year. Timely public notice of all such regular meetings shall be provided.

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f.

A list of the quorum and voting requirements for board meetings and committees.

A simple majority of the full number of Directors shall constitute a quorum of the Board for the transaction of business. When a quorum is present, a majority of the Directors present may take any action on behalf of the Board, except to the extent that a larger number is required by law, by the Charter, or by the Bylaws. Every act of a majority of the Directors present at a meeting duly held at which a quorum is present shall be regarded as the act of the Board of Directors. As described above, certain members of the Board will be ex officio and have no vote. Please find a copy of the bylaws at Exhibit 16. 21. A conflict of interest is generally defined as a situation in which someone has differing or competing professional, monetary or personal interests. Any potential conflicts of interest of the founding governing board members must be disclosed. Provide the complete and signed conflict of interest form for each proposed founding board member, located at the end of these Guidelines. This form must be included in the petition appendices and completed by each founding and/or governing board member. Please see the attached conflicts of interest forms completed by each Board member at Exhibit 19. V. CONTRACTS WITH EDUCATIONAL SERVICE PROVIDERS OR OTHER CHARTER PARTNERS 22. Does the charter school intend to contract, or has the school contracted, with an education service provider (ESP) or other charter partner, to provide management or consulting services? If so, please complete this section and include a signed, operationalized agreement submitted as an exhibit. No. a. Describe how the arrangement will be in the best educational and financial interests of the charter school. N/A b. Describe other education service providers or charter partners that were considered and the reasons this ESP or partner was selected above all others. How and why was EMO/CMO company chosen, selected? N/A c. Describe the history of the ESP or partner selected, including academic results, closures, non-renewals and separations. N/A d. Describe how the contract was negotiated. N/A e. Briefly describe the range of services the education service provider or partner will provide for the school. To what extent will the educational management company

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N/A f. N/A

participate in the management of the school? Please describe all educational and noneducational services to be provided by any educational management company or forprofit entity with which the charter school will contract. Describe how the governing board will monitor and assess the performance of the management organization.

g. What are the requirements to terminate the contractual relationship and how would terminating the relationship affect the school’s ability to continue its operations? N/A h. Describe the reporting and organizational structure of the school in regard to the governing board, school administration and educational management company in relation to the governance and management of the school. Clearly delineate which positions are employees of the [EMO/CMO] and which persons or positions are employees of the charter. Please see the organizational structure diagrams in the Appendix. Note that there will be no educational management company involved. i. N/A j. N/A

In the Appendix, provide the latest annual report for the educational management company, including audited financial statements, if available. In the Appendix, provide the educational management contract with all applicable signatures and dates of execution.

k. Is the EMO/CMO charging a fee for their services? If yes, this description should include the nature, duration, and cost of service commitments. N/A l. N/A

Please submit a list of all owners, directors and officers of the [EMO/CMO].

m. Please submit the name, address and telephone number of the legal representative and the accounting firm for the [EMO/CMO]. N/A n. In the appendix, provide references from previous schools managed by the [EMO/CMO], including academic success of students by grade and program measured by test scores and external financial audits for each school managed (both those currently opened and those that have closed) within the last three years. If the company has managed schools in the state of Georgia which have closed, the reasons for its closing should be offered. (If the company has a history of closures across the nation, please explain.) N/A o. A description of the [EMO/CMO]’s partnerships with any other charter schools, public schools, or private schools. If applicable, please provide a list of all schools managed or

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N/A

Serviced in the last five years (including those no longer in operation). Indicate the location and grade levels served of those schools.

p. Is the charter school leasing, lease-purchasing or engaging in any other property or financing relationships with the [EMO/CMO]? Is so, please provide the statement in the petition that lease, lease-purchase, or financing transactions will be separately documented and not a part of or incorporated into the [EMO/CMO]-charter school agreement. N/A 23. List any proposed business arrangements or partnerships with existing schools, educational programs, businesses, or nonprofit organizations (excluding those relationships discussed in previous section). a. Contact information for a representative of each business and/or partnership listed should be provided. We have partnered with Georgia State University’s Center for Urban Language Teaching and Research (CULTR). CULTR is a Title VI Language Resource Center of the U.S. Department of Education. A U.S. Department of Education Language Resource Center (“LRC”), CULTR is one of only 16 university-based centers in the country supported by federal grants under Title VI of the Higher Education Act. Together, these 16 LRCs make up a national network of resources to promote the teaching and learning of foreign languages by creating language learning and teaching materials, offering professional development opportunities for teachers and instructors, and conducting research on foreign language learning. Founded in 2014 and based at Georgia State University, CULTR is a partnership of the Departments of Modern and Classical Languages and the Department of Applied Linguistics/ESL in the College of Arts and Sciences and the Division of Learning Technologies in the College of Education, in collaboration with the Center for Instructional Innovation. CULTR endeavors to enhance the opportunities of urban and underrepresented students to achieve the language proficiency and cultural competence required for success in the modern global marketplace. Through a variety of initiatives that support research into world language teaching and learning, the development and dissemination of innovative language methodologies and technologies, and through the provision of professional support for language instructors, the mission of CULTR is to promote and improve access to language learning opportunities and global awareness for all learners, opening opportunities for urban students to explore and envision global careers in cultural diplomacy, national security, international business, public health, or the sciences. Dr. William Nichols, one of three Co-Directors of CULTR, has submitted a letter of support (see Exhibit 8), stating in part: “Given our purpose of enhancing opportunities for urban and under-‐represented students, CULTR recognizes the potential for a powerful, longstanding partnership with East Atlanta Charter School, which will serve a predominately minority and socioeconomically disadvantaged student population. Given its proximity to GSU and the fact that we can be involved from the very inception of the school,

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we are particularly well positioned to establish this important collaboration.” In addition to the relationship we have forged with CULTR, we have also developed relationships with other educational institutions, including the Atlanta International School, The Language Garden (a Spanish immersion preschool), the Georgia Bar Association, and several small and medium-size local businesses, including Nead Werx, the Locke Law Firm LLC, Project Locker, Red Tile Roof Studio, and WonderHealth, LLC. Each of these stands to enrich our students’ educational experience. b. Disclose any potential conflicts of interest within each arrangement or partnership. We have not identified any conflicts of interest with these partnerships. c. Include a copy of any actual or intended contract with each arrangement or partnership in the Appendix. Please see the letters of support in the Appendix at Exhibits 8 and 21. VI. FINANCIAL OBJECTIVES, PLANS, AND WAIVERS 24.

State the school’s Financial Goals and Measures. a. School financial performance objectives should reflect where the school envisions itself financially at the end of the charter term. b. Objectives should emphasize fiscal health and sustainability. c. Describe the school’s plans for fiscal management; and specify how the school will manage budgets and expenditures. d. Use the spreadsheets provided by GADOE, which list detailed budget information projecting revenues and expenditures for the first five years of the proposed charter term. If any sources of revenue appearing in the spreadsheets are anticipated to come from private sources, documentation of such revenues must be included along with the petition. Include a budget that complies with O.C.G.A § 20-2-171. Please find projected revenues and expenditures for the first five years of the proposed charter term in the Appendix. e. Identify the school’s Chief Financial Officer and describe how that person’s credentials comply with the Guidance for Georgia State Board of Education Rule 160-4-9-.04 for the purpose of developing and adhering to generally accepted accounting principles. The founding board will work with the school principal to recruit, retain, and develop a schoolsite business operations manager who will act as the organizational CFO upon hire. This person, at a minimum, will have credentials that comply with the guidance from the Georgia State Board of Education Rule 160-4-9-.04 and will begin his work in the planning year on a stipend-basis. Candidates with experience managing the finances of charter schools, in particular, will be given preference. Relationships such as those built with GSU and other support entities have already

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been formed to ensure the business/operations manager has the training and support necessary to successfully manage the school’s finances under the guidance of the school principal and board. Josh Bennett, founding treasurer and finance committee chair, will serve as the interim CFO in the planning year until the business operations manager is hired. Please find his resume in the Appendix at Exhibit 17. f.

Identify the representatives of the school who will be responsible for the financial management of the charter, and describe plans to procure and maintain during the entire length of the charter a Crime/Fidelity Bond covering all persons receiving or disbursing funds. The DCSD required bond amount is $1 million.

As described above, Josh Bennett will serve as the interim CFO in the planning year. Additionally, the Finance Committee will review and recommend the annual budget for Board approval; monitor budget compliance, all financial expenditures, and revenues and other financial issues throughout the year; recommend financial policies to the Board; and work with the Business Operations Manager, Principal, and other staff to establish financial goals and policies. East Atlanta Charter School will maintain a crime/fidelity bond, which covers all persons receiving or disbursing funds. This policy, which will be insured up to $1 million, will be maintained during the length of the charter term, and evidence of such coverage will be submitted annually to the DeKalb County School Board. 25. What specific actions will the school take to achieve the financial performance objectives? a. Describe the financial innovations that will be implemented during the proposed charter term. We plan to follow the budget outlined in Exhibit 22, supplemented by the results of fundraising and grants we secure. b. Provide a clear explanation of how the innovations will increase financial effectiveness. Our budget is designed to balance without any charitable contributions or grant funding. This has been achieved through designing an efficient and lean organizational structure. Over the five years of the initial charter, we are poised for aggressive growth through our partnership with GSU CULTR. c. Describe why the innovations are appropriate for this unique school. We have structured our budget and our school model to function without charitable donations, but through our community partnerships, we have the expertise necessary to execute effective research-based immersion language education. 26.

Fundraising or Other Sources of Income a. Please describe in detail the school’s plans for securing other sources of funding. This plan should demonstrate financial independence from the school district by using state

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and local funds and a feasible plan to supplement those funds with other funding sources on a yearly basis as required. Our Governing Board includes several members with deep experience in fundraising and grant writing. Our submitted budget does not rely on grant funding, but it is our intention to pursue grants. b. Describe any planned fundraising efforts and who will lead and coordinate these efforts. Because there is no guarantee that these funds will be awarded, you must describe how your school would remain solvent if you do not receive these funds. The Governing Board will include several people with deep experience in both fundraising and grant writing, including David Fuentes and Dr. Jonathan Lyon. One element of our partnership with GSU’s CULTR will be receiving their assistance in identifying and applying for appropriate grant funding. A representative sample of organizations that may award us grants are as follows: Scott B. & Annie P. Charitable Trust This organization gives on a national basis, with some emphasis on elementary education in Georgia. In 2013, this organization gave $188,750. The Boeing Company Global Corporate Citizenship This organization gives on an international basis in areas of company operations, including Georgia, with emphasis on early childhood and elementary education. In 2013, this organization gave $1,200,000. Jack and Anne Glenn Charitable Foundation Grant This organization gives primarily in Atlanta, Georgia, with emphasis in elementary education. In 2013, this organization gave $478,665. Regions Financial Corporation Contributions Program This organization gives in the 23-county metropolitan area of Atlanta, Georgia, with emphasis in elementary education. This organization offers curriculum development, employee volunteer services, general and operating support, and program development. The Olivia R. Gardner Foundation, Inc. This organization gives primarily in Florida and Georgia in the areas of education and human services. In 2013, this organization gave $168,000. Mills Bee Lane Memorial Foundation This organization gives primarily in Georgia and Charleston, South Carolina, with some emphasis in elementary education. In 2013, this organization gave $404,647. The Ray M. and Mary Elizabeth Lee Foundation, Inc.

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This organization limits their giving to the metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia area, with some emphasis in the areas of children and elementary education. In 2013, this organization gave $365,600. The Howard & Marcia Owens Charitable Trust This organization gives primarily in Georgia and New York with some emphasis in the areas of community development and elementary education. In 2013, this organization gave $126,000. Piedmont Charitable Foundation, Inc. This organization gives primarily in Virginia and Georgia with some emphasis in elementary education. In 2013, this organization gave $214,500. Robert B. Woodruff Foundation, Inc. This organization limits their giving to Georgia, with an emphasis on the metropolitan Atlanta area, with some emphasis in elementary education. In 2013, this organization gave $155,816,887. Because our proposed budget is balanced without any grant funding, we expect EACS to remain solvent without grant funding. c. Independent private funding sources that have been secured must be evidenced through a letter of intent, commitment letters, and/or loan agreements from the funder may be included as an Appendix item. We have not yet sought to secure independent private funding sources. d. If established, provide evidence of your organization’s federal tax-exempt status in the Appendix. Our federal tax-exempt status is forthcoming. 27. Which of the specific actions in the financial plan require a waiver of state law, rule, or guidelines? a. Although you will be granted a broad flexibility waiver if you are granted a charter, please provide examples of a significant component of your financial plan for which you need a waiver – and the waivers that are required to allow the implementation of that component. Expenditure Funds – O.C.G.A. Section 20-2-167 and Minimum Direct Classroom Expenditures--O.C.G.A. Section 20-2-171 As a public charter school, EACS’s model is that of flexible and innovative use of per-pupil and philanthropic funding. EACS will have flexible groupings of students, individualized curricula, educational partners and philanthropic donors. EACS will need the ability to utilize resources in a manner to best serve its students. Contracts for Purchases— O.C.G.A. Section 20-2-500, 20-2-501, 20-2-503

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EACS seeks to waive requirements relating to purchases as it seeks to retain maximum flexibility to allow school leadership to make purchasing decisions in the best interest of the student body. Purchasing protocols ensure that vendor contracts are competitive and the best use of resources for the school. DJE-R(1) Purchasing EACS will develop its own policies related to purchasing and use of school funds and requires flexibility to ensure that all purchases are approved and for the best interest of students of EACS. DJC-R Payroll Procedures As a public charter school, EACS will employ its own staff and thus will not utilize the payroll procedures outlined by the county. O.C.G.A. § 20-2-140 through 20-2-149 Competencies and Core Curriculum. East Atlanta Charter School seeks a waiver for these sections to the extent it requires specific curricula, sequencing of curricula, or a method of delivering curriculum that is inconsistent with East Atlanta Charter School’s educational program. However, East Atlanta Charter School will incorporate all components of the Georgia Performance Standards and the Common Core curriculum in every year of our charter. Students will also participate in mandatory state assessments. This waiver will help East Atlanta Charter School achieve its performance goals by ensuring that the sequencing and delivery of East Atlanta Charter School’s Spanish language immersion curriculum are not hampered by any inconsistent regulations. This waiver is especially important for the first years of enrollment as East Atlanta Charter School invests in building the students’ Spanish language proficiency foundation. O.C.G.A. § 20-2-156 Program for limited-English-proficient students. East Atlanta Charter School seeks a waiver of this section only to the extent it requires specific curricula, sequencing of curricula, or a method of delivering curriculum that is inconsistent with East Atlanta Charter School’s language immersion model of providing services to ELL students. This waiver will help East Atlanta Charter School achieve its performance goals by not requiring redundancy in approved instructional delivery models used by East Atlanta Charter School. However, in educating all children including limited-English-proficient students, East Atlanta Charter School, as is stated throughout our charter, will adhere to State curriculum standards. O.C.G.A. § 20-2-1010 through 20-2-1015 State Board to prescribe textbooks. East Atlanta Charter School seeks a waiver from these sections to the extent that East Atlanta Charter School will use instructional materials in Spanish and it is unlikely that such textbooks will have been evaluated by the Georgia State Board of Education. This waiver will allow East Atlanta Charter School to achieve its mission by using instructional materials that help teachers provide instruction in line with state standards and the CCGPS curriculum, but that may not have been evaluated by the State Board as the instructional materials may be used in different countries and printed in Spanish.

VII.

STUDENT ADMISSIONS

28.

How will students be admitted to the charter school?

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a. What is the school’s attendance zone? Please describe or provide a map which indicates your targeted attendance zone. East Atlanta Charter School will be open to all students who live within the DeKalb County School District, with first priority given to those who live within the area served by McNair High School (the “McNair Cluster”), as this zone is defined by the DeKalb County School District in any given year. The school's two-tiered attendance district will give priority to children who live in the McNair Cluster for several reasons: Giving admission priority to children in the immediate area over those in other parts of the school district helps the school remain financially responsible, promotes racial and socioeconomic integration, and upholds our mission to develop a community school that serves the local community. An overwhelming majority of students currently attending any school in the McNair Cluster face financial hardship, as measured by Free & Reduced Lunch program participation of approximately 98%. Families who are socioeconomically disadvantaged may be particularly unlikely and unable to take advantage of distant school choice programs, such as the very successful charter schools located in the northern and northwestern parts of the school district. We do not want East Atlanta Charter School to exist geographically within easy reach of McNair Cluster families, while its popularity grows so much that most local children are excluded by the lottery from attending. We especially abhor the idea of becoming a school for a relatively wealthy and mobile population of students who are able to trek across the county to attend, while McNair Cluster children of more modest means are excluded from the closest high-performing school. By allocating all spaces first to local children, we maximize the chance of all McNair Cluster families to be able to take advantage of this school. With the imminent relocation of the DeKalb Elementary School of the Arts in 2016, the McNair Cluster faces an immediate future in which features no high-performing school. By increasing the chance of admission for McNair Cluster children, we will promote neighborhood stability; more local families will stay put, knowing that sending their child to EACS is a realistic possibility. As EACS grows and becomes a fixture of the community, we expect its existence to have a positive impact on the other McNair Cluster elementary schools, just as the Atlanta Public School District has seen in the communities surrounding the very successful Drew Charter School and Atlanta Neighborhood Charter School. Secondly, giving first priority to McNair Cluster students makes it feasible to provide bus transportation. We intend to provide free school bus service to all students who reside in the McNair Cluster more than 1.5 miles from the school. While we will admit students living outside the McNair Cluster as space allows, we will not be able to afford to transport a handful of children scattered across the county in Dunwoody, Lithonia, Stone Mountain, Tucker, and everywhere in between. It would be an irresponsible use of our limited funds to spend excessively on transit over an area stretching several hundred square miles. In comparison, servicing the relatively compact McNair Cluster will be much less expensive. Third, the families who live nearest to the school will be the most able and the most likely to participate fully in the life of the school. We believe that living in close proximity will not only foster a high attendance rate and reduce tardiness among our student body, it will also enable families and friends to have access to our school to attend special events, such as student theatrical presentations or academic competitions, or for parents and guardians to attend parent-teacher conferences or adult academic enrichment opportunities that we plan to offer once grant funding is in place (such as GED classes or introductory Spanish instruction). Proximity will also increase the ability of more EACS families to volunteer regularly in the school.

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Additionally, living nearby will greatly increase the ability of EACS students to participate in the optional summer and vacation programming that we intend to offer to promote our students’ maintenance of their academic skills and Spanish proficiency over the school's breaks. This summer and vacation programming will be particularly valuable to the success of students joining EACS in later grades who may enter with severe academic deficits and little to no prior exposure to the Spanish language. Finally, we intend to vertically integrate with McNair Middle School and McNair High School. Specifically, we intend to partner with both schools to ensure that they each have an advanced Spanish Language Arts program suitable for East Atlanta Charter School students who are highly proficient in Spanish. If EACS students were to disperse after fifth grade to fifteen different middle schools, it would be much less likely that any of them would land in schools that are prepared to continue developing their advanced Spanish skills. Such students would then risk a drop in their proficiency. Also, though our fifth graders will be fluent in Spanish, they will still be 11-year-old children. Just like their English reading and writing skills will still be developing and will still have vast potential for improvement, their Spanish skills will likewise greatly benefit from additional immersion education or other high-level Spanish instruction appropriate for their age and level of proficiency. In DCSD’s 2015-2016 Memorandum of Understanding about immersion education, it outlines future considerations for children who complete a K-5 immersion program, such as the three programs DCSD created in 2013 at Ashford Park Elementary (German); Evansdale Elementary (French); and Rockbridge Elementary (French). DCSD has committed to provide these immersion students with ongoing second language education at the middle school level. Specifically, it offers one content course in the target language, and a second course in advanced language study. At the high school level, these students will complete the appropriate Advanced Placement Examination(s) in ninth grade, and continue on to advanced language student through blended learning offered at colleges and universities. Some may elect to pursue study of a new foreign language. We expect DCSD to extend its support of immersion students to those who complete EACS’s academic program. Given the existence of Common Core Spanish Language Arts academic standards and affiliated curricula and materials, and given how common it is to offer Spanish classes to middle and high school students in DeKalb, it will be relatively easy to provide appropriate Spanish language education to our highly proficient students once they reach middle and high school. In addition to increasing their access to appropriate ongoing Spanish language learning, we believe that when the majority of EACS children move on together to one middle school, it will be beneficial for their social adjustment as they transition into adolescence. McNair Cluster children are at grave risk of dropping out of high school, and we believe that the interpersonal relationships that EACS students will develop with each other in elementary school can help sustain them through the challenging teenage years, keep them engaged in school, and promote their long-term success. In contrast, if EACS children were to scatter across the whole county after fifth grade, each one would have to start over in developing friendships and figuring out their place in an entirely new community of students. The prospect of EACS fifth graders matriculating as a group into McNair Middle School may also increase the likelihood among some parents who reside in the McNair Cluster to utilize the local public school option when they may otherwise have chosen a private school, a far-flung “school of choice” elsewhere in the school district, or even relocation. In particular, we expect the creation of East Atlanta Charter School to encourage middle class and racially diverse families to participate in the local public schools of the McNair Cluster. This impression has been developed over the course of conversations with dozens of local families who support the creation of East Atlanta Charter School.

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After the EACS students have completed their middle school years at McNair Middle School, McNair High School is the ideal secondary program for them. With its dual focus on college and career readiness, McNair High School prepares students for long-term success in life. It defines “college ready” as prepared for any postsecondary experience (certificate, license, or university degree), without need for any academic remediation. “Career ready” means prepared to earn a family-sustaining wage, with the academic and soft skills to qualify for and succeed in any chosen career. McNair’s interest-based programs are being developed to meet industry standards and prepare McNair graduates to join the 21st century workforce. At this point, McNair High School is exploring proposed pathways in a variety of fields expected to grow and produce jobs in the coming years, such as audio and video technology and film; hospitality, recreation, and tourism; law enforcement; and health support professionals. McNair students who pursue any of these proposed pathways would benefit enormously from the proficiency in Spanish that they would already have developed at East Atlanta Charter School as elementary students. Combining proficiency in Spanish with extensive career preparation and solid academics will produce high school graduates with an admirable slate of skills and limitless academic and professional opportunities. The EACS-McNair pipeline could become a success admired and imitated across the state. b. Please state the following enrollment priorities that apply, pursuant to O.C.G.A. § 20-22066(a)(1), in the rank order the school will use them. If the school will not utilize any enrollment priorities, please leave this section blank. i. A sibling of a student enrolled in the start-up charter school ii. A sibling of a student enrolled in another local school designated in the charter iii. A student whose parent or guardian is a member of the governing board of the charter school or is a full-time teacher, professional, or other employee at the charter school iv. Students matriculating from a local school designated in the charter East Atlanta Charter School will also utilize the following enrollment priorities, in the following order: 1. A sibling of a student enrolled in the start-up charter school. 2. A student whose parent or guardian is a member of the governing board of the charter school or is a full-time teacher, professional, or other employee at the charter school. Admitting siblings of current EACS students will heighten the family’s investment in their children’s experience at East Atlanta Charter School, which will promote our goal of student retention. Siblings will also have an increased opportunity to use Spanish outside of the classroom, compared to students who do not have much access to other Spanish speakers outside of school. Children of full-time employees or governing board members will also have priority enrollment, in order to heighten the appeal of working at EACS or serving on its governing board. It is a long-term priority to attract and retain excellent staff and to fill the governing board with highly competent, skilled professionals who are invested in the success of the school. c. Describe the rules and procedures that will govern admission and registration. Please include the school’s admissions policy for potential students that are equitable, nondiscriminatory, and will ensure that the student populations will reflect diversity. Please note that “enrollment priorities”, “admission” and “registration” are different concepts. To avoid confusion the GADOE recommends the following:

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i. ii. iii.

“enrollment priorities” describe those students granted priority pursuant to O.C.G.A. § 20-2-2066(a)(1); "admission" describes pre-lottery processes and forms; and "registration" describes post-lottery processes and forms after the student has been offered a seat at the school through enrollment priorities or the lottery process.

There are no prerequisites for admission to East Atlanta Charter School. All students who are eligible to attend DCSD schools are eligible to apply. Priority enrollment will be given to McNair Cluster students as described above, and if demand exceeds the school’s capacity, students will be admitted by random lottery (or on a first-come, first-served basis if the number of applicants by the lottery date is fewer than the number of available seats). No tuition will be charged. No enrollment information will be required until after students have been selected in the lottery. Please see the admissions application in the Appendix. EACS will admit students via lottery conducted in February at the close of the open enrollment period. We will randomly select from the pool of students who have submitted the application form. This period will open January 1 of each year and close at a pre-determined date in mid-February annually. When possible, the enrollment period will be aligned to other DCSD schools of choice to make enrollment calendars and requirements clear and consistent for parents throughout the district. Admitted students and their families will be invited to informational sessions and school visits to learn more about our unique whole-school Spanish-English dual language immersion program. We will encourage each parent or guardian to sign an optional statement of commitment to immersion education, in which they commit to send their child to EACS through the fifth grade; agree to participate in educational activities which will support the educational program; and commit to provide a home environment and opportunities beyond the school date that reinforce the language goals of the program. This parent commitment is aligned with DCSD’s 2015-2016 Memorandum of Understanding for immersion education (see Exhibit 2). d. Describe procedures for situations if student applications for admissions exceed

available space, including the following: i. The precise manner in which the lottery will be conducted and by whom; ii. Measures to ensure that the admissions process adheres to legal requirements; and the procedures for wait-listing students who are not included in the first round of lottery offers.

East Atlanta Charter School will enroll students as follows: Returning students and their siblings, children of full-time employees, and children of board members are pre-enrolled. The pre-enrollment period ends at the beginning of February. Following the pre-enrollment period, offers of admission will be made in the following order for each grade level: 1. Students residing in the area zoned for McNair High School; then 2. Students residing in DeKalb County School District. If there are more applicants than the number of spaces available for a grade level, spaces remaining in each class after the pre-enrollment period will be awarded on the basis of a public lottery. Each applicant will be assigned an ID number, and those ID numbers will be selected at random in a public lottery administered by the Secretary of the Board of Directors or the Board’s designee. Two waiting lists will be formed if the number of applicants exceeds the number of

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available spaces, one list for students residing in the area zoned for McNair High School and the second list for students residing in DeKalb County School District. Students who decline an offer of admission may remain on the waiting list in their present position for a period of 12 months from the date of the original offer of admission. They will be listed as “inactive” on the waiting list and it will be the responsibility of the parent or guardian of that student to inform the school, in writing, to return to “active” status. As additional openings arise, enrollment will continue from the active waiting list in the order of the applicant’s lottery numbers, beginning with the first list and, after exhausting that list, continuing to the second list. If at any point in the year the waiting list is depleted and the school determines it has enrollment openings, then a new one-month enrollment period will be declared. Siblings, students of fulltime employees, and students of governing board members will be placed at the front of the waiting list if a waiting list exists, except not before any other sibling, student of a full-time employee, or a student of a governing board member. All families must annually submit required enrollment documentation and proof of residency documentation. e. How will the charter school reach students representative of the racial and socioeconomic diversity in the school system? East Atlanta Charter School will foster racial and socioeconomic diversity by focusing intensively on recruiting throughout the McNair Cluster. We will visit preschool programs, set up booths at community events, and seek to send representatives to public community gatherings such as neighborhood association and church meetings. We plan to set up informational tables outside of popular destinations in the McNair Cluster, such as the Gresham Walmart or the Gresham Library, to maximize awareness of our school and answer questions on the spot. Please see Exhibit 23 for more information about the McNair Cluster of schools and its student population. We will also maintain a robust online presence, which has already begun with our website www.EastAtlantaCharterSchool.com, our Facebook page, and our email list. We will liaise with partners such as the Friends of South DeKalb Schools, the East Atlanta Community Association, and the South DeKalb Parent Network to inform and communicate with McNair Cluster families about the opportunity to attend East Atlanta Charter School Based on the high turnout at our public meetings during the pre-petition phase, we are confident that EACS is a model with broad appeal. Our meetings have attracted eclectic crowds, diverse in many senses. We believe that East Atlanta Charter School will offer all of its students the opportunity to learn alongside a diverse group of peers. For example, we expect the student body to be racially diverse, with large numbers of African American and white students, and to also include children of other racial backgrounds; to include children of a wide range of socioeconomic backgrounds, hailing from a variety of family structures including one- and twoparent homes, kin or foster homes, and same-sex parent homes. We expect EACS parents to range widely in age from early 20s to the 50s, and we expect them to represent the gamut in educational attainment, from high school dropouts to Ph.D.s. During our efforts to raise public awareness of EACS, we have also heard from a number of families who are currently raising their children to speak Spanish, whether as the family’s heritage language, or through programs such as language-immersion daycare or preschool, including East Atlanta’s Language Garden Preschool. We will also strive to attract families from the small but growing Latino population of the McNair Cluster. Our dual language immersion model is equally suitable for English Language

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Learners as it is for Spanish Language Learners. Furthermore, it will be enormously valuable for our English-background students to learn from peers who are native speakers of Spanish. For Latino families, enrolling their children EACS will ensure that the youngest generation develops advanced Spanish literacy. EACS children will learn not only familiar Spanish appropriate for family and casual settings, but also professional, formal Spanish that will ultimately help them secure employment in professional settings that require Spanish-English bilingualism. Thus, even children who already speak Spanish fluently at home stand to benefit greatly from our Spanish program. The McNair Cluster student body in 2015 is not particularly diverse. At this time, the student body is close to 100% African American, and approximately 98% participate in the Free and Reduced Lunch program. We expect East Atlanta Charter School to have a majority of African American students. At the same time, based on the feedback we have received from the public thus far, and based on the demographics of the general population of the immediate area (not just of the children currently attending the public schools), we believe that there will also be a significant number of white and multiracial student at EACS. We believe that all students are enriched by the opportunity to learn alongside students of various races, and that there is no place for racially segregated schools in the 21st century. f.

How does the school plan to recruit students and maintain/increase enrollment? Please include an enrollment application in the appendix.

We will recruit students using the methods described above. Given our dual language immersion model, class sizes will not grow larger from year to year. Rather, we will focus on retaining our kindergartners all the way through fifth grade. We will admit new students into any spots vacated through attrition, but we will focus on starting each academic year with full classes of kindergarten and first grade students. Please find our enrollment application in the Appendix at Exhibit 24. g. Attach the charter school’s proposed annual calendar and a draft of the charter school’s daily school schedule. We intend to follow the academic calendar established by DCSD each year. Doing so will be the most helpful option for EACS families who may have younger and older students attending other DCSD schools. We will also follow DCSD’s weather-related closures. However, we do not intend to follow DCSD’s designation for “Half Student Days, Teacher Full Day.” Both students and teachers will have a normal full day on days that DCSD has designated as Half Student Days. (Exhibit 25.) Our daily school schedule is what is sometimes known in the immersion education field as the “roller coaster.” In order to divide their time evenly between Spanish and English, each class will rotate each day, around lunch time, to the other language. Since lunchtime is not at the exact midpoint of the day, and in order to keep their instructions time divided evenly between Spanish and English, each classroom will start one day in one language, followed by the afternoon in the other language, and then the following day, the order will switch. Thus, Classroom 1 would start Monday morning in Spanish with Señora Garcia. After lunch, they would go to Ms. Jones’s classroom and study in English for the rest of the day. On Tuesday, they would start out with Ms. Jones, later returning to Señora Garcia after lunch. While Classroom 1 is with one teacher, the partner teacher is teaching another cohort of the same grade level in Classroom 2. (Exhibit 26.)

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Compared to a simpler A Day/B Day model, the “roller coaster” has the benefit of exposing each child to Spanish every single school day. In the A Day/B Day model, each child routinely has a span of three days each week in which they may have no Spanish input (the weekend plus Friday or Monday). Rotating morning and afternoon also ensures that scheduling that affects the school day does not destroy the 50/50 balance. If the children of Classroom 1 go to music every Monday afternoon, half of the weeks, this would occur during their Spanish block of time. The other half of the time, it would occur during the English block. For children regularly taken from the general class for special education or gifted instruction, again, the “roller coaster” will ensure that they do not miss out disproportionately on one language over the other. East Atlanta Charter School’s daily schedule is also designed explicitly to allow teachers ample time to plan collaboratively. Each grade will have four classrooms, and each classroom will be assigned two teachers (one English, one Spanish). Thus, each teacher will have a partner teacher that shares responsibility for the same two classrooms of children. As these teachers switch places with each other each day, they will need to coordinate carefully to ensure continuity of instruction. Each teacher will be expected to communicate daily with his or her partner teacher regarding their classes and the week’s curriculum. Each child at EACS will study as their core academic subjects English language arts, Spanish language arts, math, science, and social studies. Based on the guidance of our expert bilingual education advisors, we have designated science as a Spanish-language subject and social studies as an English-language subject. Thus, each child will study science in Spanish every day, while with his or her Spanish teacher, and social studies in English every day, while with his or her English teacher. Thus, each teacher will teach either science or social studies twice per day, once to each classroom. This has several advantages. First, delivering the same lesson twice will free up planning time, because each teacher will only be responsible for three main subjects rather than four. Second, these particular subjects were selected to be delivered in one language only because of the dearth of Georgia performance standards aligned Spanish-language social studies curriculum. Most Spanish-language social studies curricula do not fit well with Georgia’s standards. Rather than have our teachers produce translations of Georgia social studies materials, EACS students will learn social studies in English. Unlike social studies, there is bountiful high-quality Spanish-language science material aligned with Georgia performance standards, so it will be possible to study science exclusively in Spanish and still learn every single component of the Georgia standards. While there would certainly be advantages to learning even more social studies in Spanish and even more science in English, it was decided to assign them each to only one language in acknowledgement of the time limits of a school day. Children would experience disjointed and lower quality instruction if they were to bounce between completely distinct social studies curricula (Washington crossing the Potomac on Monday, then the Bolivarian revolution on Tuesday, then back to the Revolutionary War on Wednesday…) Each day, all students will study both reading and math in Spanish and English. The teachers will coordinate to make sure there is continuity for their classes. Teachers will make sure that the math lessons in particular are complementary and not redundant, as the children work their way through the common core mathematics standards.

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VIII. FACILITIES 29.

Describe the school facility that the charter school proposes to use.

EACS has identified multiple options for our school location, some of which would meet our long term needs, and others which could meet our needs in the beginning if for some reason none of the others were available for our use by the beginning of the 2016-2017 school year. EACS is requesting the use of a DCSD building. To spend money paying rent to a private entity instead of on salaries and instructional expenses would be an imprudent use of funding when there are multiple very suitable options within the McNair Cluster. (See Exhibit 27.) Based on information provided to the public by the DeKalb County School District on its website, we have identified more than 4,000 available seats within local schools either in the McNair Cluster itself or in the Columbia Cluster immediately to the east. We have identified four buildings which are already vacant or which are scheduled to be vacant by 2016. We have also identified four other schools which are scheduled to remain occupied, but which each have so much spare capacity that they could potentially house EACS within their school for two or more years. DCSD projects enrollment in Super-Cluster 5, of which the McNair Cluster is a part, to continue declining through at least 2020. Meanwhile, new schools are being built here, increasing capacity. Thus, we expect that DCSD will be able to make available to us one of the eight schools we have identified, or another appropriate facility. Our first choice is the Terry Mill facility currently occupied by the DeKalb Elementary School of the Arts. This 614-seat school is located in the McNair Cluster. Of all of our options, this building is in the best condition, and its location and street access make it the best option for transportation. DCSD has announced that the facility will be declared surplus after June 2016, after which the DESA students will attend the new Comprehensive Arts Magnet School at the Avondale MS facility. Our second choice is the Sky Haven Elementary facility, which has been vacant since June 2011. This 659-seat school is located within the McNair Cluster. This building has substantial documented repair needs, but we believe that we could begin using the facility in August of 2016 and pay for repairs gradually through large-scale, ongoing fundraising. Meadowview ES is a 477-seat McNair Cluster elementary school slated to be declared surplus in June 2016. The student body will transfer to the new Gresham Park ES to be built at the current Clifton ES site. Given the need to build the new elementary school before the Meadowview students vacate the current facility, it appears that they may in fact remain in the Meadowview facility through the 2016-2017 school year. Meadowview ES currently has 85 open seats, which is not adequate for EACS even in the first year. However, once it is vacant, it could meet the needs of EACS for at least the first 4 years of operation. At full enrollment, EACS could reach 528 students. Thus, while Meadowview is not an ideal permanent facility for the program, it could work with the addition of portable classrooms in year 5. The Terry Mill, Sky Haven, and Meadowview facilities are slated to be empty in 2016 and would largely meet both our immediate and long-term facility needs. Additionally, we have identified 6 other local school facilities that may work, at least in the short term. Wadsworth Elementary is currently occupied by the Wadsworth Magnet program, which is scheduled to relocate to the Knollwood Elementary facility after June 2015. Wadsworth Elementary has a capacity of 666 students, and there are currently 422 seats available. We

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understand that the Wadsworth facility will be the temporary school for Rockbridge Elementary’s student body while Rockbridge ES is undergoing rebuilding. Thus, it appears likely that Wadworth will not be vacant until the second year of EACS operations. The Wadsworth ES facility is located east of the McNair Cluster in the neighboring Columbia Cluster. If we were assigned this facility as our permanent location, we would seek to align our attendance district to include both the McNair and Columbia Clusters as first priority for admission. This would complicate our goal to collaborate with the middle and high schools that EACS students would feed into, and it would substantially increase the cost of providing school busing, but it would still be acceptable. McNair MS is our zoned middle school. It has a capacity of 1461 students and current enrollment of 762. Based on DCSD's enrollment projections for Super-Cluster 5, we expect it to have approximately 817 empty seats in 2016. McNair MS is the most underutilized middle school facility in the district at 48%. It would not be ideal to house our elementary program within a middle school, and it would be an additional complication that McNair MS is slated to be replaced with a new building as part of SPLOST, but sharing space with McNair MS could be an adequate short or long-term option for EACS. McNair HS is our zoned high school. It has a capacity of 1524 and current enrollment of 723. Based on DCSD's enrollment projections for Super-Cluster 5, we expect it to have approximately 795 empty seats by 2016. McNair HS is the most underutilized high school facility in the district at 53%. It would not be ideal to house our elementary program within a high school, but sharing space with McNair HS could be an adequate short or long-term option for EACS. Toney ES is a 661-seat elementary school that currently has 235 empty seats. It is located east of the McNair Cluster in the neighboring Columbia Cluster. Based on DCSD's enrollment projections for Super-Cluster 5, we expect it to have approximately 240 empty seats in 2016. It has enough empty seats to potentially share space with EACS during our first 2 years of operations. Columbia ES is a 774-seat elementary school that currently has 177 empty seats. It is located east of the McNair Cluster in the neighboring Columbia Cluster. Based on DCSD's enrollment projections for Super-Cluster 5, we expect it to have approximately 181 empty seats in 2016. It has enough empty seats to potentially share space with EACS during our first 2 years of operations. a.

Is the facility new or existing? Describe the quantity and types of rooms (i.e. classrooms, administrative offices, program specific space (science labs, art workshops, etc.), media center, meeting space, and/or kitchen facility.)

Please see the Appendix for the most recent Official Capacity Verification report produced by DCSD for each school facility we have identified. b.

Will the facility require renovations? If so, describe the extent of the renovations and source of funding to pay for the renovations. (Building plans must be approved by the DeKalb County School’s Facilities department.) I.

Please include a narrative regarding how the renovations will comply with all applicable local zoning and building codes and timetable to achieve compliance. Include how anticipated completion date for each major phase of renovation.

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Given that we have not yet been assigned a facility, we have not planned for any specific renovations. That said, we are aware of the condition of each facility based on DCSD’s 2011 Facility Condition Assessments. II.

Any rehabilitation work necessary for this site to meet building codes applicable to schools must be completed before the start of the school year and must include the following:  The scope of the work to be completed and proposed funding mechanism to cover these costs;  The person(s) who will manage the project and their qualifications; and  A project timeline.

Again, because we have not yet been assigned a facility, we do not have a specific plan in place for rehabilitation work, but we agree to complete any work necessary to meet building codes applicable to schools prior to the beginning of the school year. We will define the scope of work and the funding mechanism; the person(s) who will manage the project and their qualifications; and a project timeline, promptly upon identification of the facility and approval of our charter petition. III.

If applicable, include written verification from the appropriate municipality that the zoning and land use regulations for the site will permit the operation of a public school on the premises.

Since the eight facilities we have identified all currently or recently operated as public schools, we are certain that each is properly zoned. c.

What is the location of the facility?

We hope to be located in the McNair Cluster in a facility that is adequate for our projected needs. Thus, our first choice is the Terry Mill facility at 797 Fayetteville Road, Atlanta, Georgia 30316. Our second choice is Sky Haven Elementary, located at 1372 Sky Haven Road SE, Atlanta Georgia 30316. I. N/A II.

N/A d.

If the charter intends to lease or contract with a church or other religious organization, please attach the questionnaire, entitled “Building Lease with Religious Organization Form,” regarding this arrangement. Provide documentation of ownership or a copy of the lease of the facility. If ownership documentation or a lease is unavailable, provide a timeline for obtaining such facilities or providing such documentation (this question does not apply to conversion charter schools).

How does this facility meet the required space needed for the proposed school? Please indicate if the identified site will accommodate the school through the initial charter term and at full capacity. If the school will not start at full capacity, describe how the school will accommodate growth over an initial five-year term of the school.

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Both the Terry Mill and Sky Haven facilities are large enough to accommodate East Atlanta Charter School even at its maximum size of 528 students in 24 classrooms across six grades. Terry Mill has 38 rooms and can hold 614 students. Sky Haven has 36 rooms and can hold 659 students. If necessary, since we will start with a student body of no more than 176 and then add one grade per year, we could begin operating in part of the school while closing off other sections for necessary repairs or just to minimize utility expenses. e.

If applicable, schools must submit a School Site Selection Form for Site and Facility Approval for a site or facility not owned by the DeKalb Board of Education. This also includes completion of a “Phase I Environmental Site Assessment.” (Place these items in the Appendix.)

N/A. We intend to be located in a facility owned by DCSD.

30. Does the charter school have an MOU for the facility pending charter and facility approval? No, but we have been working with the DeKalb County School District to become inform and seek to have an appropriate surplus facility released for charter school use. a.

The MOU should include the total proposed facility cost.

b.

The MOU should set forth any material terms that will be reflected in a lease, such as the lease term.

N/A

N/A 31.

Does the charter school have a Certificate of Occupancy (CO) for the proposed facility? a.

Please note that schools must obtain a CO no later than 45 days before the start of the charter term on July 1. Attach a copy of Certificate of Occupancy. Please provide a Certificate of Occupancy, or a timeline detailing the latest possible date by which the Certificate of Occupancy will be obtained prior to students occupying the proposed facility.

We will obtain a Certificate of Occupancy at least 45 days in advance of the first day that students will occupy the school in August of 2016. 32. Does the charter school have an emergency safety plan pursuant to O.C.G.A. § 20-2-1185 for the proposed facility? Please note that schools must submit an emergency safety plan no later than 45 days before the start of the charter term on July 1. a.

Provide the school’s emergency/safety plan in the Appendix.

East Atlanta Charter School will produce a safety plan in accordance with the guide in the Appendix. EACS’s safety plan will be submitted to the DeKalb County School District no later

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than 45 days before the start of the charter term on July 1. See our outline for the plan at Exhibit 28. b.

Describe how all local and state policies related to health and safety will be met.

East Atlanta Charter School will comply with the Uniform Building Code Inspection and the Standard Building Code, Standard Plumbing Code, Standard Mechanical Gas Code, Americans with Disabilities Act as Amended (ADAAA) access requirements and other applicable fire, health and structural safety requirements, local state, and federal laws. East Atlanta Charter School will meet all applicable codes for sanitation, fire, construction, stability, temperature, ventilation, and suitability of physical space. East Atlanta Charter School will maintain a certificate of occupancy from the required government agency. East Atlanta Charter School will grant access to local health and fire department officials for inspection of the premises or operations of the school for purposes of ensuring the health, safety, and welfare of students and employees pursuant to Georgia Statutes and National Fire Protection Association Life Safety Code, N.F.P.A. 101. East Atlanta Charter School will seek the approval of the local board of education and the State Board of Education prior to occupancy for any future facilities, beyond those proposed in the petition, which will be used to educate students. IX. STUDENT DISCIPLINE 33. Please state whether or not the school intends to adopt the DeKalb County School District’s Student Code of Conduct as the school’s discipline policy. a. Provide the school’s student discipline policies and procedures, setting forth student due process procedures for all disciplinary action, not just for the most serious forms of discipline such as out-of-school suspension and expulsion, in a Code of Conduct, as an Appendix item. East Atlanta Charter School will adopt the DCSD Student Code of Conduct, and modify this document to meet the due process needs of the school. An electronic copy of the charter school’s Student Code of Conduct will be submitted to the Charter Office by August 1st of each school year. b. Provide a description of how the charter school will meet the federal due process requirements for students with disabilities, or students believed to have a disability, who are suspended or removed for disciplinary reasons. East Atlanta Charter School shall comply with federal due process procedures regarding student discipline and dismissal. Students who are not meeting academic, behavioral, or other expectations will be identified based on assessment data, in-class performance, and other observations or data. A classroom teacher will contact the parents or guardians to discuss the students’ performance and outline strategies that will be utilized in the classroom to support the student. Responses to interventions will be monitored, and if the interventions are unsuccessful, the Student Support Team process will be initiated. The SST is comprised of the principal, both classroom teachers, special education teachers, interventionists, and other staff as appropriate.

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A psychologist or other licensed professional who will participate in the student’s evaluation may also participate in this initial meeting, as may the parents and student. The SST may institute curriculum modification, learning style assessment, positive behavioral supports, achievement evaluation, home-school communication, or study skill assistance. Requests for special education services may also be made through the SST. Prior to consideration for special education referral, non-special education options and interventions will be used, documented, described, and discussed at the special education placement meeting. The SST process is identification of needs, evaluation if necessary, drafting an educational plan, implementation of the plan, follow-up and support, and continuous monitoring and evaluation. If the interventions are unsuccessful or the SST determines that an evaluation should take place, the team will convene with the student’s parent or guardian. The special educational teacher will secure written permission for psychological and academic evaluations to determine if the child is eligible for special education services. If the student qualifies, an IEP will be constructed and services aligned to that IEP will begin immediately. Any student who is receiving these special education services or has been identified as a student with a disability under IDEA or a student who may qualify for services and whose acts are determined by the teacher, principal, or board to have violated any rules, regulations, or laws, shall be referred to an IEP committee to determine if the student’s conduct is manifestation of his or her disability. If a student with disabilities has an IEP that includes disciplinary guidelines, the student will be disciplined according to those guidelines as required by IDEA. Nothing in the EACS approach will be permitted to infringe upon any rights provided pursuant to IDEA, Section 504, or the ADA. c. If the school intends to require a uniform, the dress code policy should also be included. Please see the proposed uniform policy within the Family Handbook at Exhibit 29. X. OTHER INFORMATION 34. Describe whether transportation services will be provided and include a statement that the transportation program will comply with applicable law. If transportation services are not provided, explain how this will not discourage eligible students from attending the school. East Atlanta Charter School agrees to provide the system with transportation safety documentation, if any, as required by the GADOE no later than June 1 for the pending school year. East Atlanta Charter School’s transportation program will comply with applicable law and any vehicles or drivers used for transporting students will meet the same safety standards applicable to public schools in this State. 35. State whether the charter school will provide food services (including participation in the National School Lunch Program). a. If food services will be provided, please describe this program briefly.

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East Atlanta Charter School will likely educate a very high percentage of socioeconomically disadvantaged children. Thus, it intends to participate in the National School Breakfast and Lunch Program. b. If food services will not be provided, please indicate your plans for providing for student lunches. This plan should include information on whether the food will be prepared onsite or off-site and the anticipated cost to students and other significant elements of the food service program should be provided. East Atlanta Charter School will submit an application to the GADOE and will be responsible for accurately counting meals and submitting financial reimbursement claims to the GADOE for meals meeting specified nutritional standards. We intend for food to be prepared on-site and to make it as affordable as possible to those children who do not qualify for Free or Reduced Lunch. However, we have not finalized plans as our ability to prepare food on-site depends on the kitchen facilities of the school facility where we will be located. 36.

Provide information on the school’s legal representation or counsel. a.

How will the proposed school ensure compliance with the requirements of law with respect to legal issues?

The Board of Directors will always have at least one member who will be a licensed attorney in Georgia. The lawyers on the Board of Directors will serve as general counsel to answer any legal questions that arise. Should EACS require representation beyond the scope of what the Board of Directors can provide, EACS shall retain legal counsel. The founding Board includes three attorneys licensed to practice in Georgia, who together have substantial experience in education law, real estate law, administrative law, immigration law, civil litigation, and criminal law, as well as significant experience working on behalf of socioeconomically disadvantaged and otherwise underrepresented clients. Please see the resumes of the Board members for further information. b.

Please confirm whether this organization or individual has reviewed the DCSD charter petitioner guidelines and petition document to be submitted.

Three of the Founding Directors who have drafted this charter petition are licensed attorneys in Georgia, and each has carefully reviewed both the Guidelines and the charter petition document that East Atlanta Charter School is submitting. 37. Describe the charter school’s insurance coverage, including the terms and conditions and coverage amounts thereof. Information on insurance coverage and amounts are required in the following areas: a. b. c. d. e. f.

General Liability Errors or Omissions Property/Lease Insurance Auto Liability Worker’s Compensation Theft

Copies of the school’s insurance policies should be included as an Appendix item. If insurance policies do not exist, please provide the following statement: “Copies of each

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policy shall be provided to the DCSD Charter School Office prior to the opening of the school.” Please list the date by which evidence of insurance will be submitted. Pursuant to O.C.G.A. § 20-2-2065(b)(5), the DeKalb County Board of Education will be included as an additional insured, and EACS will hold harmless and indemnify DeKalb County School District, the board of education, its members, officers, and employees for every liability, claim, or demand upon EACS; and EACS agrees to defend and indemnify the DeKalb County Board of Education in any action arising in any way from EACS’s activities. Insurance coverage will include, at a minimum:  Workers compensation in compliance with State law;  Employer’s liability insurance to cover bodily injury by accident in the amount of $100,000 per occurrence;  Bodily injury by disease in the amount of $100,000 for each employee;  Automobile liability insurance in the following amount: o Comprehensive insurance in an amount not less than $1,000,000 for bodily injury and property damage; and o Specific extensions of comprehensive form coverage for all EACS-owned, hired, leased, and non-owned vehicles used in the operation of EACS;  Comprehensive general liability insurance in the following forms: o Comprehensive form; o Contractual insurance; o Personal injury; o Broad form property damage o Premise operations; and o Completed operations. This coverage shall be in an amount not less than $1,000,000 and shall cover the use of all equipment, hoists, and vehicles on the premises not covered by automobile liability. This policy coverage will be on an occurrence basis. Copies of each policy shall be provided to the DCSD Charter School Office prior to the opening of the school. Evidence of East Atlanta Charter School’s insurance coverage will be submitted to the DCSD Charter School Officer no later than June 15, 2016. See the Appendix for representative sample policies at Exhibit 30. 38. Additional information that may support the information presented in the narrative section of your petition and helps the reviewer to better assess the proposed charter school may be included in the appendices. DCSD may request additional attachments/appendices as needed. Pages in the appendices should be numbered, labeled, and included in the Table of Contents. Labeled tabs/ dividers should separate the appendices. Please attach only materials referenced in your petition, such as budget forms, certificates of incorporation, bylaws, education management company or other third party contracts, facilities, Letter of Intent and/or Memorandum Of Understanding, resumes, and signed conflict of interest forms. Examples of common attachments/appendices are listed below, but are not solely limited to these items. 39.

Letter of Assurances

The law requires your school provide assurances that it will do certain things and comply with certain laws. The DCSD Letter of Assurance Form enumerates these and other mandatory requirements. When you submit this form as part of your charter school application package,

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you are providing the legal assurance that your charter school understands and will do these things. This form must be signed by a duly authorized representative of the school. The Letter of Assurance Form is located at the end of this manual. The District reserves the right to add assurances, modify, or individualize this document for a petitioner, before or after the Board of Education’s approval.

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East Atlanta Charter School Petition Appendix Table of Contents Tab Number

Document Name

Page Number

1

Georgia Department of Education Immersion Information

Appendix-001

2

DeKalb County School District Immersion Information

Appendix-010

3

Information about use of Spanish in the United States

Appendix-012

4

Letter of support from expert bilingual professor and author Dr. Rebecca Callahan, together with her article and her C.V.

Appendix-014

5

Summary of the research of the benefits of immersion language education

Appendix-029

6

Sample metropolitan Atlanta jobs that prefer or require Spanish proficiency

Appendix-053

7

Evidence of community support for East Atlanta Charter School: change.org petition results, including comments

Appendix-114

8

Letter of partnership from Georgia State University’s Center for Urban Language Teaching and Research (CULTR), together with information about CULTR and C.V.s of the three Directors.

Appendix-136

9

Spanish Language Arts Common Core standards

Appendix-153

10

Full Curriculum with Alignment to Georgia Performance Standards

Appendix-224

11

Curriculum-based measures

Appendix-285

12

Information about proposed instructional materials

Appendix-340

13

American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages Performance Descriptors for Language Learners

Appendix-363

14

Job descriptions

Appendix-381

15

Organizational charts

Appendix-394

16

Governing board bylaws and election of officers

Appendix-399

17

Resumes of founding board members

Appendix-414

18

Certification of Incorporation

Appendix-436

19

Board questionnaires/Conflict of Interest forms

Appendix-437

20

Code of Ethics

Appendix-452

21

Letters of Support for the petition from institutions and businesses: Atlanta International School The Language Garden The State Bar of Georgia Nead Werx Locke Law Firm LLC Project Locker Red Tile Roof Studio WonderHealth, LLC

Appendix-458

22

Monthly cash flow projections for first two years of operation (with revenue and expenditures), at full enrollment and at projected enrollment and start-up and five-year operating budgets

Appendix-466

23

Information about the McNair Cluster of schools

Appendix-467

24

Proposed enrollment application

Appendix-485

25

Proposed annual calendar (EACS will follow DCSD’s calendar)

Appendix-487

26

Proposed daily schedule

Appendix-488

27

Facilities plans

Appendix-494

28

Emergency safety plan outline

Appendix-516

29

Family handbook, including student dress code

Appendix-519

30

Insurance/indemnification information

Appendix-535

31

Eligible school checklist

Appendix-548

32

Signed letter of assurances

Appendix-549

Appendix-001

Appendix-002

Appendix-003

Appendix-004

Appendix-005

Title I Conference June 2014

2014 Georgia’s College and Career Ready Performance Index

Appendix-006

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