Elementary LANGUAGE ARTS - Saluda County Schools

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Elementary LANGUAGE ARTS District Essential Map

LAWTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS Barry Beauchamp, Superintendent of Schools Revised July 2012

play·book – noun 1. (in Elizabethan drama) the script of a play, used by the actors as an acting text. 2. a book containing the scripts of one or more plays. 3. Football. a notebook containing descriptions of all the plays and strategies used by a team, often accompanied by diagrams, issued to players for them to study and memorize before the season begins. 4. Informal. any plan or set of strategies, as for outlining a campaign.

Table of Contents CCCS Implementation Guide………………………………………………....1 Forward Progress……………………………………………………………...2 Scott Foresman Reading Street Codes………………………………………...4 Teacher and Leader Evaluation (TLE) Information…………………………..7 Building Academic Vocabulary - Audibles…………………………………11 Middle School Reserved List………………………………….…………… .17 High School Reserved List…...........................................................................18 Play Options…………………………………………………………………..20 MAX Teaching and the CCSS……………………………………………….27 Writing Information………………………………………..……………...….34 3rd-6th Grade Common Core Curriculum Standards – Writing………………..49 3rd -5th Grade C3 (PASS) Objectives – Writing………………………………57 3rd Grade Depth of Knowledge Blueprint……………….……………………68 3rd Grade Reading & Writing Pacing Guides………………………………...69 4th Grade Depth of Knowledge Blueprint…………………………………….90 4th Grade Reading & Writing Pacing Guides ………………………………...91 5th Grade Depth of Knowledge Blueprint………………………………….….112 5th Grade Reading & Writing Pacing Guides ………………………………...113 3rd -6th Grade PASS Objectives – Reading……………………………………131

Common Core State Standards Implementation Timeline for Oklahoma Public Schools

June 24, 2010 - State Board of Education Adopted Common Core State Standards and Implementation Timeline July 6, 2010 - Governor Brad Henry Approved Adoption 2010-2011 School Year • • •

Districts develop and begin implementing a District Transition Plan, updating as needed Oklahoma State Department of Education begins development of resources and professional development opportunities for teachers and administrators State assessment reflect the Priority Academic Student Skills (PASS) (Oklahoma C3 Standards)

2011-2012 School Year • •

Oklahoma State Department of Education continues to assist districts in implementation of District Transition Plans through resource development and professional development opportunities for teachers and administrators State assessment reflect the Priority Academic Student Skills (PASS) (Oklahoma C3 Standards)

2012-2013 School Year • Oklahoma State Department of Education continues to assist districts in implementation of District Transition Plans through resource development and professional development opportunities for teachers and administrators • State assessment reflect the Priority Academic Student Skills (PASS) (Oklahoma C3 Standards) 2013-2014 School Year • •

Oklahoma State Department of Education continues to assist districts in implementation of District Transition Plans through resource development and professional development opportunities for teachers and administrators State assessment reflect the Priority Academic Student Skills (PASS) (Oklahoma C3 Standards)

2014-15 School Year • • •

Full implementation of Common Core State Standards (Oklahoma C3 Standards) Oklahoma State Department of Education continues to assist districts in implementation of District Transition Plans through resource development and professional development opportunities for teachers and administrators State assessment reflect the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) (Oklahoma C3 Standards) via Common Assessments developed in conjunction with other states

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Forward Progress C3 Standards = PASS Objectives C3 – College, Career, Citizen Ready

For more information about the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) please visit the following websites.

http://www.corestandards.org/ http://www.parcconline.org/about-parcc

For Oklahoma C3 Standards and CCSS side-by-side please visit http://ok.gov/sde/oklahoma-c3-side-sides

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Forward Progress Oklahoma State Department of Education http://ok.gov/sde/oklahoma-c3-side-sides Language Arts C3 & Common Core State Standards (CCSS) Side-by-Sides http://ok.gov/sde/test-support-teachers-and-administrators#OCCT-Test-Item-specs Test and Item Specification Documents http://ok.gov/sde/building-academic-vocabulary - Building Academic Vocabulary

General References on the Common Core: http://commoncore.org http://corestandards.org http://www.edexcellence.net/publications-issues/publications/now-what-imperatives-and.html

Science: http://www.nsta.org/about/standardsupdate.aspx http://scienceblogs.com/tfk/2010/07/national_science_standards_dra.php

Social Studies: http://www.socialstudies.org/commonstandards http://socialstudies.org/draft_common_standards_elicit_kudos_and_criticism

PARCC http://www.achieve.org/PARCC http://www.parcconline.org/about-parcc

Coming Together to Raise Achievement http://classroom.jc-schools.net/waltkek/ Mrs. Waltke's Literacy Page http://www.readwritethink.org http://www.maxteaching.com http://www.troup612resources.troup.k12.ga.us/Instructional%20Strategies%20&%20Resources/Strategies.htm

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Scott Foresman Reading Street Online Access Information Using the following instruction, you may set up online access to the Online Leveled Reading Data Base, teacher editions and student books. Pearson SuccessNet is a powerful web application that provides resources for teachers. When using Pearson SuccessNet, be sure to turnoff your pop-up blocker program. SuccessNet uses pop-ups, so your computer must allow them. Turn off Pop-Up Blocker from the Tools Menu in your browser. Registering: First time users 1. Go to www.pearsonsuccessnet.com 2. From the Welcome screen, click Register 3. Enter access code SFRDLR06NTEN00T (leveled reader data base) 06 and 00 are numbers and case sensitive An access code unlocks the products that are licensed to your school. Once you register this code you may add additional codes for teacher editions. 4. Click Next. 5. On the Enter Profile screen, enter in your school’s Zip Code. 6. From the Select School or Building list, click your school or building name, If your school is not listed, type the first two or three digits of the Zip Code. DO NOT SELECT A SCHOOL UNLESS IT IS THE CORRECT ONE 7. Complete the following: Title – select your title. First Name – type your first name Last Name – type your last name Teacher ID – Optional if you have one Username – type your username. ( create your own) Password – type your password (something you will remember) Your password is case sensitive and must contain six or more numbers and/or letters with no punctuation or spaces. Confirm Password – type your password a second time. Password hint – type a hint that will help you remember your password. Security Question – select a security question. Your Answer – type the answer to your security question. Email address – type your school email address Confirm Email address – type your email address a second time After your registration is complete, you may confirm your registration or log in. SuccessNet confirms that the selected school is licensed to the products associated with your access code. Your registration is complete when there is a match between the school’s license and the access code and all required information is entered. You must confirm that your registration information is correct. 4

If you are already a Pearson Successnet user you may add products to your account by following the direction below: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

From the home page select My account. Click Manage products Click Add new products Enter the product access code (codes listed below) Click Check code

You will need to restart your account after new products are added. Logging in: 1. Go to: www.pearsonsuccessnet.com 2. Type your username and password 3. Click on Log in - your home page will appear with products that were added. The following codes contain products that can be added to your account.

Kindergarten Resource Reading Online Teacher Edition 2008 Gk Reading Online Student Edition 2008 Gk Reading Success Tracker 2008 Gk Reading Leveled Readers 2006 Bundle Science Leveled Readers Social Studies Leveled Readers

Code SFRDTR08NTEN0kB SFRDSR08NTEN0kB SFRDST08NTEN0kT SFRDLR06NTEN00T SFSCLR06NTEN00T SFSSLR06NTEN00T

1st Grade Resource Reading Online Teacher Edition 2008 G1 Reading Online Student Edition 2008 G1 Reading Success Tracker 2008 G1 Reading Leveled Readers 2006 Bundle Science Leveled Readers Social Studies Leveled Readers

Code SFRDTR08NTEN01B SFRDSR08NTEN01B SFRDST08NTEN01T SFRDLR06NTEN00T SFSCLR06NTEN00T SFSSLR06NTEN00T

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2nd Grade Resource Reading Online Teacher Edition 2008 G2 Reading Online Student Edition 2008 G2 Reading Success Tracker 2008 G2 Reading Leveled Readers 2006 Bundle Science Leveled Readers Social Studies Leveled Readers

Code SFRDTR08NTEN02B SFRDSR08NTEN02B SFRDST08NTEN02T SFRDLR06NTEN00T SFSCLR06NTEN00T SFSSLR06NTEN00T

3rd Grade Resource Reading Online Teacher Edition 2008 G3 Reading Online Student Edition 2008 G3 Reading Success Tracker 2008 G3 Reading Leveled Readers 2006 Bundle Science Leveled Readers Social Studies Leveled Readers

Code SFRDTR08NTEN03B SFRDSR08NTEN03B SFRDST08NTEN03T SFRDLR06NTEN00T SFSCLR06NTEN00T SFSSLR06NTEN00T

4th Grade Resource Reading Online Teacher Edition 2008 G4 Reading Online Student Edition 2008 G4 Reading Success Tracker 2008 G4 Reading Leveled Readers 2006 Bundle Science Leveled Readers Social Studies Leveled Readers

Code SFRDTR08NTEN04B SFRDSR08NTEN04B SFRDST08NTEN04T SFRDLR06NTEN00T SFSCLR06NTEN00T SFSSLR06NTEN00T

5th Grade Resource Reading Online Teacher Edition 2008 G5 Reading Online Student Edition 2008 G5 Reading Success Tracker 2008 G5 Reading Leveled Readers 2006 Bundle Science Leveled Readers Social Studies Leveled Readers

Code SFRDTR08NTEN05B SFRDSR08NTEN05B SFRDST08NTEN05T SFRDLR06NTEN00T SFSCLR06NTEN00T SFSSLR06NTEN00T

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Personal Trainer With the new Teacher and Leader Evaluation (TLE) going into effect, the following are some suggestions to help you achieve your best on two of the dimensions: Common Core & Professional Growth and Continuous Improvement. Dimension 8 – Instructional Effectiveness: Teacher understands and optimizes the delivery focus of the Common Core State Standards and the expectations derived from same on student learning and achievement. •

To receive a 4 (Highly Effective) – Teacher has participated in available learning opportunities to assure a strong foundation of understanding the conversion process from PASS to CCSS and regularly and routinely uses alternate instructional strategies and modified content focus aligned with CCSS.

Dimension 17 – Professional Growth and Continuous Improvement: Uses Professional Growth as a Continuous Improvement Strategy •

To receive a 4 (Highly Effective) – Teacher participates in the required hours of professional development and seeks additional training to update their content knowledge and professional practices beyond what is required.

For a full description of the TLE and all the dimensions, visit http://ok.gov/sde/sites/ok.gov.sde/files/TLETPSFramework12.pdf. Pages 9-10 contain ONE FORMAT that you could use for a personal log. The websites listed contain links to archived webinars, videos of the CCSS being modeled in real classrooms, and other links to help keep you at the top of your game. These will help you meet the requirements of the TLE. Hunt’s Institute – A series of videos about the CCSS by the writers of the CCSS http://www.ccsso.org/Resources/Digital_Resources/Common_Core_Implementation_Video_Series.html Teaching Channel – Short videos that include CCSS strategies used in actual classrooms http://www.teachingchannel.org/videos?page=1&load=1 Simplek-12 – Webinars on many topics http://community.simplek12.com/scripts/student/webinars/ Lead and Learn – Keep up to date on the latest educational research http://www.leadandlearn.com/multimedia-resource-center/webinars/2012 7

~NOTES~

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Personal Training Log It is recommended that you keep a log of your professional development. This is one example of what a log could look like. Date 8/12/12

Title The ABCs of Assessment

Format Webinar

Narrative This webinar explained background information on CCSS. Assessments were discussed – they are technology-based and contain more real-world questions. I will need to follow up with a site they provided (Pearson’s Next Generation Assessments).

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Date

Title

Format

Narrative

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LAWTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS Building Academic Vocabulary 2012-2013

Audibles - Kindergarten The following is the Building Academic Vocabulary list from the Oklahoma State Department of Education.



Math above add behind below beside between calendar circle clock compare count fifth first fourth graph hour left length measure money number on over pattern rectangle right second shapes sort (same/different) square subtract third time triangle under zero



Science air animal cloud color day earth egg float flower food growth insect light living night parent plant seasons spring summer fall winter seed senses shape sink soil sort water



Language Arts alphabet author back cover book bottom consonant different fairy tale follow directions front cover letter listening skill lowercase name picture book retell rhyme same sight word title top uppercase vowel words CCSS Words My favorite book is

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Social Studies American Flag career/employment basic needs classroom community cooperate customs holiday home legends/folktales language money national symbol obey Oklahoma Oklahoma Flag property respect responsibility rules savings school state town/city transportation United States

LAWTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS Building Academic Vocabulary 2012-2013

Audibles – 1st Grade The following is the Building Academic Vocabulary list from the Oklahoma State Department of Education.



Math addition angle backward/forward chart congruent describe digit direction equal even explain foot greater than guess half hour inch increasing pattern less than list minus minute number line numeral odd order ordinal plus size solve subtraction tallies temperature value weight



Science attract camouflage desert freezing gravity liquid magnet magnifier measure moon ocean pull push safety shelter sky solid star sun thermometer



Language Arts alphabetize beginning consonant blend chapter character conversation date (written form) discuss end ending consonant illustrate language long vowel middle noun period plural poem predict punctuation question (mark) reread sentence setting short vowel singular spelling table of contents title page verb vocabulary

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Social Studies Africa Antarctica Arctic Ocean Asia Atlantic Ocean atlas Australia cardinal directions city/urban commemorative holidays

continent encyclopedia Europe globe Independence Day Indian Ocean map neighborhood/community North America ocean/seas Pacific Ocean past/present/future patriotic symbols/traditions

Pledge of Allegiance rural/county seasons South America Southern Ocean Star Spangled Banner timeline trade

LAWTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS Building Academic Vocabulary 2012-2013

Audibles – 2nd Grade The following is the Building Academic Vocabulary list from the Oklahoma State Department of Education.



Math addends classify decrease difference distance estimate fractions halves thirds fourths gallon height hexagon hundreds increase model numeric pattern octagon ones pentagon pint place value pound quart quarter hour regroup standard measures sum symmetry table tens thermometer volume whole number



 Science Language Arts behavior adjective characteristics antonyms dissolve apostrophe distance base word diversity of life cause/effect fuel compound word gas comprehension graph conclusion habitat contraction hibernation dictionary larva fiction life cycle fluent natural resources folk tale pattern guide words physical properties homonym/homophone planets infer predator informational text predict main character prehistoric nonfiction prey prefix scientist pronoun shadow purpose SI Units quotation (mark) meters sequencing centimeters suffix degrees Celsius summarize similarities/differences synonyms space thesaurus texture topic visualization CCSS Words also and because

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Social Studies Appalachian Mountains

bank barter basic landform biography cash citizenship courage credit card cultural features goods and services Great Lakes region gulf history honesty landmark literature location luxuries Mississippi River mountains occupation patriotism plains recreation rivers Rocky Mountains title weather

LAWTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS Building Academic Vocabulary 2012-2013

Audibles – 3rd Grade The following is the Building Academic Vocabulary list from the Oklahoma State Department of Education. 

Math algorithm analog clock area array bar graph



Science amphibians balance conservation contract dispersal endangered environment



Language Arts abbreviation adverb biography chapter headings check for understanding



Social Studies agriculture borders capital resources climate conflict consumer culture

migrate mixture physical change pollination

chronological order conjunction contemporary realistic fiction context clues declarative encyclopedia exclamatory fact glossary historical fiction imperative index inferences interrogative

renewable/nonrenewable resources

main idea

natural resources

meter centimeter

reptiles rock

modern fantasy multi-meaning words

physical map political map

gram

solution

homonyms/homophones

population

commutative property

coordinates customary/standard measurement data denominator density digital clock division edge face factor grid horizontal input metric units

kilogram multiple multiplication number sentence numerator ordered pairs output perimeter pictograph probability product rounding three-dimensional vertex vertical

extinct food chain germinate invertebrate investigate mammals metamorphosis complete & incomplete

sound structures traits vertebrate vibrations

opinion persuasion possessive revise run-on sentences story elements subject supporting details theme CCSS Words and,but,more,also another because for example since therefore 14

distribution economy Equator geographic features geography global hemisphere human resources industry&manufacturing

latitude/parallels longitude/meridians map key/legend

Prime Meridian producer product representative leaders resources scale scarcity suburban thematic unit wants and needs

LAWTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS Building Academic Vocabulary 2012-2013

Audibles – 4th Grade The following is the Building Academic Vocabulary list from the Oklahoma State Department of Education. 

Math acute angle associative axis computation dividend divisor elapsed time equivalent expanded form expression frequency table hundredths inequality symbols intersecting inverse operation line graph obtuse angle parallel perpendicular prediction quotient reasonable reflection right angle rotation rule standard form lengths translation variable



Science adaptation balance scale classification conductor consumer decomposer deposition direction electrical circuit (open and closed) electricity erosion evidence force (pull/push) fossils friction inherited traits insulator mineral motion organism position producer reproduce resistance sediment SI Prefixes micro milli centi kilo SI Units grams meters liters degrees Celsius speed stationary objects survival weathering



Language Arts almanac analyze appendix audience author’s purpose character’s motive compare/contrast double negatives

Social Studies almanacs bay canyon city council delta economic specialization

entrepreneur exports

drawing conclusions

global trade

evaluate genre hyperbole legend metaphor myths outline paraphrase persuasive possessive nouns prewrite preface proofread publish research sentence fragment simile simple predicate simple subject

governor human system immigrants

CCSS Words also another because for example for instance in addition in order to

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intermediate directions

land run mayor mesa major metropolitan center point of view/perspective

prairie primary sources region relative location rural secondary sources state capitol state legislature Trail of Tears tributary urban

LAWTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS Building Academic Vocabulary 2012-2013

Audibles – 5th Grade The following is the Building Academic Vocabulary list from the Oklahoma State Department of Education. 

Math balanced base composite deposit distributive property fair number cube



Science acids/bases atmosphere axis biome chemical change chemical properties



 Language Arts Social Studies caption abolitionist character development amendments comparative American Revolution Articles of Confederation adjectives/adverbs concluding paragraph basic freedoms Bill of Rights conflict

greatest common factor (GCF)

community

coordinating conjunctions

cause and effect

improper fractions

condensation

figurative language

colony

least common denominator (LCD) least common multiples (LCM)

crater

free verse

decompose

generalization

Constitutional Convention and Ratification Declaration of Independence

mean metric prefixes milli centi kilo mixed numbers percent

dichotomous keys earth’s layers crust mantel core eclipse

idiom interjections

democracy executive branch

introductory paragraph

explorers

historical map indentured servant Industrial Revolution judicial branch

plane

energy (kinetic/potential) environmental changes (human & nature)

minor character onomatopoeia parts of speech poetic styles reference source

legislative branch

prime proper fraction range ray

evaporation graduated cylinder mass matter

resolution rhythm stereotypical stress

Lewis & Clark Expedition

straight angle

moon/lunar (phases)

superlative adjectives & adverbs

mission

thousandths Venn Diagram withdraw

observe orbit pollution population precipitation revolution rotation Scientific Method serial order solar energy Solar System species transfer of energy Universe weather

text (structure) transitional words word origins

Native American/Indian

CCSS Words consequently especially in contrast specifically terminal-punctuation

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Louisiana Purchase manifest destiny mental mapping

Preamble Puritan Quaker religion revolution rights slavery supply & demand taxes topographic map triangular trade U.S. Constitution westward expansion women’s suffrage

LAWTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS Middle School Reserved Reading Selections Revised 2011-2012 * Denotes Required Reading

6th Grade

7th Grade

8th Grade

*Hatchet

* The Outsiders

*Diary of Anne Frank

*Holes

A Christmas Carol

*Flowers for Algernon/Monster

*Watsons Go to Birmingham

Across Five Aprils

A Girl Named Disaster

(* Choose 1 of the 3)

Boy in the Striped Pajamas

Amelia Earhart

A Wrinkle in Time

Bud, not Buddy

Assassin

Black Pearl

Devil’s Arithmetic

Bully, The

Bridge to Terabithia

Don’t Look Behind You

Call of the Wild, The

Canterville Ghost, The

Face on the Milk Carton

Code Talker

Egypt Game, The

Full Tilt

Contender, The

Hoot

Giver, The

Dragonwings

Island of the Blue Dolphins

Johnny Tremain

Farewell to Manzanar

Jeremiah’s Song

Kokopelli’s Flute

Glory Field

Lob’s Girl

Out of the Dust

Heart of a Champion, The

Magician’s Nephew

River, The

House of Dies Drear, The

Maniac Magee

Sudden Silence

Martian Chronicles, The

My Side of the Mountain

Tuck Everlasting

My Brother Sam is Dead

On My Honor

Uglies

Night

Phantom Tollbooth, The

Walk Two Moons

Night Light

Pinballs

Whatever Happened to Jane?

Nothing but the Truth

Poems by Emily Dickenson &

Where the Red Fern Grows

Summer of My German

Christian Rossetti

White Fang

Soldier

Something for Joey

Taking Sides

Stargirl

That Was Then, This Is Now

Story of My Life, The

Trouble with Lemons, The

Summer of the Monkeys

Tyray Hobbs

True Confessions of Charlotte

Witness

Doyle, The Tunes for Bears to Dance To

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LAWTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS High School Reserved Reading Selections Revised November 2011 * Denotes Required Reading English I *Romeo and Juliet *Odyssey *To Kill a Mockingbird 13 Reasons Why Animal Farm Book Thief, The Dracula Fahrenheit 451 Grass Dancer, The Great Expectations Heart is a Lonely Hunter, The Hunger Games Legend of Sleepy Hollow, The Of Mice and Men

English II *Julius Caesar Anthem Antigone Arabian Nights Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court Glass Castle Island of Dr. Moreau, The Lord of the Flies Metamorphosis Monkey’s Paw, The Old Man and the Sea, The Separate Peace, A Speak Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, The Tuesdays with Morrie/Five People You Meet in Heaven (Do not do both in one year.)

English III *Crucible *Great Gatsby, The *Scarlet Letter, The (* Choose 2 of the 3) A Raisin in the Sun All Quiet on the Western Front Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, The Autobiography of Frederick Douglass Catcher in the Rye, The Different Seasons Ethan Frome Fountainhead Grapes of Wrath, The Interesting Narrative and Other Writings Olaudah Equiano , The Long Day’s Journey into Night Our Town Poisonwood Bible, The Red Badge of Courage, The Secret Life of Bees, The Things They Carried, The Uncle Tom’s Cabin Way to Rainy Mountain, The

English IV *Macbeth

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Angela’s Ashes Beowulf Black Hawk Down Brave New World Canterbury Tales, The Cyrano de Bergerac Don Quixote Frankenstein Grendel Gulliver’s Travels Hamlet Importance of Being Earnest, The Ivanhoe Jude the Obscure Kite Runner Othello Picture of Dorian Gray, The Pride and Prejudice Pygmalion Return of the Native, The Sir Gawain and the Green Knight Tale of Two Cities, A Tartuffe and Other Plays Three Musketeers, The Twelfth Night Wuthering Heights

~NOTES~

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Play Options Consider these extra points to help give your students the winning edge!

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~NOTES~

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Larry Bell’s Power Words Analyze Compare Contrast Describe Evaluate Explain

Formulate Infer Predict Summarize Support Trace

Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy Eval. Synthesis Analysis Application Comprehension Knowledge

Creating Evaluating Analyzing Applying Understanding Remembering

New Version

Old Version

Remembering: Can the student remember or recall the information?

define, duplicate, define, memorize, recall, repeat, reproduce, state

Understanding: Can the student explain ideas or concepts?

classify, describe, discuss, explain, identify, locate, recognize, report, select, translate, paraphrase

Applying: Can the student use the information in a new way?

choose, demonstrate, dramatize, employ, illustrate, interpret, operate, schedule, sketch, solve, use, write

Analyzing: Can the student distinguish between the different parts?

appraise, compare, contrast, criticize, differentiate, discriminate, distinguish, examine, experiment, question, test

Evaluating: Can the student justify a stand or decision?

appraise, argue, defend, judge, select, support, value, evaluate

Creating: Can the student create new product or point of view?

assemble, construct, create, design, develop, formulate, write

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Questioning to Promote Higher Order Thinking Skills The Six Types of Socratic Questions

Five Types of Questions

By R. W. Paul

Newer Views on Learning/Socratic-Questioning By Leslie Owen Wilson

Questions for clarification: How do you say that? How does this relate to our discussion?

Factual Soliciting reasonable simple, straight-forward answers based on obvious facts or awareness. Lowest level of cognitive or affective processes and answers are frequently right or wrong.

Example Name the Shakespeare play about the Prince of Denmark?

Questions that probe assumptions: What could we assume instead? How can you verify or disapprove that? Questions that probe reasons or evidence: What would be an example? What is … analogous to? What do you think causes to happen …? Why?

Convergent Answers to these questions are usually within a very finite range of acceptable accuracy. These may be at several different levels of cognition – comprehension, application, analysis, or ones where the answerer makes inferences or conjectures based on personal awareness, or on material read, presented or known.

Example On reflecting over the play Hamlet, what were the main reasons why Ophelia went mad? (This is not specifically stated in the text so reader must make simple inferences to why she committed suicide.)

Questions about viewpoints and perspectives: What would be an alternative? What is another way to look at it? Would you explain why it is necessary or beneficial, and who benefits? What are the strengths and weaknesses of …? How are … and … similar? What is a counterargument for …?

Divergent These questions allow students to explore different avenues and create many different variations and alternative answers or scenarios. These questions often require students to analyze, synthesize or evaluate a knowledge base and then project or predict different outcomes.

Example In the love relationship of Hamlet and Ophelia, what might have happened to their relationship and lives if Hamlet had not been so obsessed with the revenge of his father’s death?

Evaluative These types of questions usually require sophisticated levels of cognitive and/or emotional judgment. In attempting to answer, students may be combining multiple logical and/or affective thinking processes. Answers are analyzed at multiple levels and from different perspectives for answerer to arrive at newly synthesized information or conclusions.

Example Compare and contrast the death of Ophelia with that of Juliet?

Questions that probe implications and consequences: What generalizations can you make? What are the consequences of that assumption? What are you implying? How does … affect …? How does … tie in with what we learned before? Questions about the question: What is the point of this question? Why do you think I asked this question? What does … mean? How does … apply to everyday life?

Combinations These are questions that blend any combination of the above.

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What are the similarities and differences between Roman gladiatorial games and modern football?

Bloom’s Taxonomy Levels of Questioning Knowledge Identification and recall of information Knowledge of dates, events, places Knowledge of major ideas Mastery of subject matter Comprehension Organization and selection of facts and ideas Interpretation of facts, compare, contrast Order, group and infer causes Predict consequences Understanding information Grasping meaning Translate knowledge into new context Application Use information, rules, principles Use methods, concepts, theories in new situations Solve problems using required skills or knowledge Analysis Separation of the whole into component parts Seeing patterns Organization of parts Recognition of hidden meanings Synthesis Use of old ideas to create new ones Relate knowledge from several areas Generalize from given facts Predict, draw conclusions Evaluation Development of opinions, judgments, or decisions Make choices based on reasoned argument Verify value of evidence Recognize subjectivity & assess value of theories

Question Cues

Examples

List

Define

Tell

Describe

Identify

Show

Label

Collect

Examine

Tabulate

Quote

Name

Who

When

Where

Explain

Discuss

Compare

Extend

Interpret

Predict

Describe

Contrast

Outline

Restate

Summarize

Distinguish

Apply

Demonstrate

Calculate

Complete

Illustrate

Show

Solve

Examine

Modify

Relate

Change

Classify

Analyze

Explain

Arrange

Select

Separate

Connect

Divide

Infer

Order

Classify

Compare

Debate

Combine

Rearrange

Create

What if?

Rewrite

Design

Integrate

Substitute

Compose

Prepare

Modify

Plan

Invent

Formulate

Generalize

Assess

Grade

Recommend

Judge

Decide

Test

Convince

Support

Rank

Measure

Select

Conclude

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List the main characteristics for the main characters. Arrange scrambled story pictures in sequential order. Match statements with the characters who said them. Describe ….

Draw a picture showing what happened before and after a passage or illustration. Retell … in your own words. What is the main idea of …? Construct a pictorial timeline which summarizes what happens in the story. Transfer the new character to a new setting. Why is … significant? Do you know another situation where …? What factors would you change if …? Select parts of the story that were funniest, saddest, happiest, most unbelievable. Compare and/or contrast two of the main characters. Differentiate fact from opinion. What evidence can you list for …? Classify … according to …. Advertise the story on a poster to make people want to read it. Write the lyrics and music to a song for one of the characters to sing. How would you create/design a new …? Rewrite two new titles for the story. Do you agree with …? Write a recommendation for …. Prioritize …. What criteria would you use to assess …? Judge whether or not the character should have acted the way they did.

QUESTION MARK BOOKMARK FOR QUALITY QUESTIONS Knowledge – Identification and recall of information Who, what, when, where, how _______________? Describe _________________________________? Comprehension – Organization and selection of facts and ideas. Retell ___________________ in your own words. What is the main idea of ___________________? Application – Use of facts, rules, principles How is _______________ an example of ______? How is _______________ related to _________? Why is _________________________ significant? Analysis – Separation of a whole into component parts What are the parts or features of ____________? Classify _____ according to ________________. Outline/diagram/web _____________________. How does ______ compare/contrast with _____? What evidence can you list for ______________? Synthesis – Combination of ideas to form a new whole What would you predict or infer from ________? What ideas can you add to _________________? How would you create/design a new _________. What might happen if you combined __ with ___? What solutions can you suggest for __________? Evaluation – Development of opinions, judgments, or decisions Do you agree ____________________________? What do you think about ___________________? What is the most important _________________? Prioritize ________________________________? What criteria would you use to assess _________? Forget, Mark A. MAX Teaching with Reading and Writing: Classroom Activities for Helping Students Learn New Subject Matter While Acquiring Literacy Skills. Victoria, BC, Canda: Trafford Publishing, 2004. 251. Print. 25

DOUBLE COVERAGE Marzano’s Instructional Strategies 1. Identifying Similarities and Differences

2. Summarizing and Note Taking

3. Reinforcing Effort & Providing Recognition 4. Homework and Practice 5. Non-Linguistic Representations 6. Cooperative Learning 7. Setting Objectives & Providing Feedback 8. Generating & Testing Hypotheses

9. Questions, Cues, & Advanced Organizers

MAX Teaching Activities Anticipation Guide, Previewing, Cornell Notes, Cubing, KWL, Focused Free Writes, Math Translation, GIST, Guided Reading Procedure, INSERT, Paired Reading, PQRST, Extreme PR, Think-Pair-Share, Stump the Teacher, 3-Level Study Guide, Idea Survivor Anticipation Guide, Fiction Prediction, Cornell Notes, Cubing, KWL, Focused Free Writes, Math Translation, GIST, Guided Reading Procedure, Hunt for Main Ideas, I-Cloze, Paired Reading, PQRST, Extreme PR, Sensible Sentence, Graphic Representation, Stump the Teacher, 3-Level Study Guide, Concept Check, Idea Survivor ALL Cornell Notes, Cubing, Math Translation, Hunt for Main Ideas, INSERT, ICloze, PQRST, Sensible Sentence, Graphic Representation, Think-PairShare, 3-Level Study Guide, Idea Survivor Previewing, INSERT, Sensible Sentence, Graphic Representation Anticipation Guide, Cubing, Fiction Prediction, KWL, Guided Reading Procedure, GIST, Hunt for Main Ideas, INSERT, I-Cloze, Paired Reading, PreP, Extreme PR, Sensible Sentence, Graphic Representation, Think-PairShare, 3-Level Study Guide, Idea Survivor ALL Anticipation Guide, Previewing, Fiction Prediction, KWL, PreP, Focused Free Write, Guided Reading Procedure, I-Cloze, PQRST, Extreme PR, Graphic Representation, Think-Pair-Share, 3-Level Study Guide, Stump the Teacher, Concept Check, Idea Survivor Anticipation Guide, Previewing, Cornell Notes, Fiction Prediction, KWL, Insert, I-Cloze, PQRST, PreP, Extreme PR, Sensible Sentence, Graphic Representation, Think-Pair-Share, 3-Level Study Guide, Stump the Teacher, Concept Check, Idea Survivor 26

MAX Teaching and the CCSS - Reading Standards for Literature 3–5

RL

The following standards offer a focus for instruction each year and help ensure that students gain adequate exposure to a range of texts and tasks. Rigor is also infused through the requirement that students read increasingly complex texts through the grades. Students advancing through the grades are expected to meet each year’s grade-specific standards and retain or further develop skills and understandings mastered in preceding grades. Grade 3 Students: Key Ideas and Details 1. Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.

Grade 4 Students:

Grade 5 Students:

MAX Teaching Strategy

1. Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

1. Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

2. Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures; determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details in the text.

2. Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text.

2. Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text.

3. Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.

3. Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions).

3. Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., how characters interact).

Cubing, Fiction Prediction, FFW, Graphic Representation, INSERT, Think-PairShare

4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including those that allude to significant characters found in mythology (e.g., Herculean).

4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes.

Concept Check, Context Clues, Cornell Notes, Graphic Representation, FFW, Interactive Cloze, Magic Squares, PreP, Previewing, Think-Pair-Share, Triangle Truths

5. Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza; describe how each successive part builds on earlier sections.

5. Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems (e.g., verse, rhythm, meter) and drama (e.g., casts of characters, settings, descriptions, dialogue, stage directions) when writing or speaking about a text.

5. Explain how a series of chapters, scenes, or stanzas fits together to provide the overall structure of a particular story, drama, or poem.

Hunt for Main Idea, INSERT, FFW, Think-Pair-Share

6. Distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters.

6. Compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first- and third-person narrations.

6. Describe how a narrator’s or speaker’s point of view influences how events are described.

Cubing, Fiction Prediction, FFW, Idea Survivor, Think-Pair, Share, Triangle Truths

Craft and Structure 4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, distinguishing literal from nonliteral language.

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3 Level Guide, AG, Graphic Representation, Guided Reading Procedure, Idea Survivor, INSERT, KWLS, Paired Reading, PQR2ST, Sensible Sentence Highlighting, Triangle Truths Cubing, GIST, Graphic Representation, FFW, Idea Survivor, INSERT, PQR2ST, PreP, Think-Pair-Share

MAX Teaching and the CCSS - Reading Standards for Literature 3-5 Grade 3 Students: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas 7. Explain how specific aspects of a text’s illustrations contribute to what is conveyed by the words in a story (e.g., create mood, emphasize aspects of a character or setting). 8. (Not applicable to literature) 9. Compare and contrast the themes, settings, and plots of stories written by the same author about the same or similar characters (e.g., in books from a series).

Grade 4 Students:

RL Grade 5 Students:

7. Make connections between the text of a story or drama and a visual or oral presentation of the text, identifying where each version reflects specific descriptions and directions in the text.

7. Analyze how visual and multimedia elements contribute to the meaning, tone, or beauty of a text (e.g., graphic novel, multimedia presentation of fiction, folktale, myth, poem).

8. (Not applicable to literature) 9. Compare and contrast the treatment of similar themes and topics (e.g., opposition of good and evil) and patterns of events (e.g., the quest) in stories, myths, and traditional literature from different cultures.

8. (Not applicable to literature) 9. Compare and contrast stories in the same genre (e.g., mysteries and adventure stories) on their approaches to similar themes and topics.

Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity 10. By the end of the year, read and 10. By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, at the high end of the dramas, and poetry, in the grades 4–5 text grades 2–3 text complexity band complexity band proficiently, with independently and proficiently. scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

10. By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, at the high end of the grades 4–5 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

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MAX Teaching Strategy 3 Level Study Guide, AG, Cornell Notes, Cubing, Graphic Representation, INSERT, FFW, PreP, Think-Pair-Share

Cornell Notes, Cubing, Fiction Prediction, Graphic Representation, INSERT, FFW, Think-Pair-Share

All MAX Teaching Strategies

MAX Teaching and the CCSS - Reading Standards for Informational Text 3–5 Grade 3 Students: Key Ideas and Details 1. Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.

1. Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

1. Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

3 Level Guide, AG, Guided Reading Procedure, Idea Survivor, INSERT, KWLS, PQR2ST

2. Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain how they support the main idea.

2. Determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text.

2. Determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the text.

3. Describe the relationship between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text, using language that pertains to time, sequence, and cause/effect.

3. Explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text.

3. Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in the text.

Cornell Notes, Cubing, FFW, GIST, Guided Reading Procedure, Hunt for Main Idea, INSERT, Newlywed Notes, Paired Reading, PQR2ST, Sensible Sentence Highlighting, Think-Pair-Share, Triangle Truths Cubing, Fiction Prediction, FFW, Graphic Representation, INSERT, Think-PairShare

4. Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words or phrases in a text relevant to a grade 4 topic or subject area.

4. Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 5 topic or subject area.

5. Use text features and search tools (e.g., key words, sidebars, hyperlinks) to locate information relevant to a given topic efficiently.

5. Describe the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in a text or part of a text.

5. Compare and contrast the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in two or more texts.

6. Distinguish their own point of view from that of the author of a text.

6. Compare and contrast a firsthand and secondhand account of the same event or topic; describe the differences in focus and the information provided.

6. Analyze multiple accounts of the same event or topic, noting important similarities and differences in the point of view they represent.

Craft and Structure 4. Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 3 topic or subject area.

Grade 4 Students:

Grades 5 Students:

RI

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MAX Teaching Strategy

Concept Check, Context Clues, Cornell Notes, Graphic Representation, FFW, Interactive Cloze, Magic Squares, PreP, Previewing, Think-Pair-Share, Triangle Truths Hunt for Main Idea, INSERT, FFW, Think-Pair-Share

Cubing, Fiction Prediction, FFW, Idea Survivor, Think-Pair, Share, Triangle Truths

MAX Teaching and the Reading Standards for Informational Text 3-5 Grade 3 Students: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas 7. Use information gained from illustrations (e.g., maps, photographs) and the words in a text to demonstrate understanding of the text (e.g., where, when, why, and how key events occur).

RI

Grade 4 Students:

Grade 5 Students:

MAX Teaching Strategy

7. Interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears.

7. Draw on information from multiple print or digital sources, demonstrating the ability to locate an answer to a question quickly or to solve a problem efficiently.

3 Level Study Guide, AG, Cornell Notes, Cubing, Graphic Representation, INSERT, FFW, PreP, Think-Pair-Share

8. Describe the logical connection between particular sentences and paragraphs in a text (e.g., comparison, cause/effect, first/second/third in a sequence).

8. Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text.

8. Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text, identifying which reasons and evidence support which point(s).

9. Compare and contrast the most important points and key details presented in two texts on the same topic.

9. Integrate information from two texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably.

9. Integrate information from several texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably.

3-2-1 Review, 3 Level Study Guide, AG, Bologna Sandwich, Cornell Notes, FFW, GIST, Graphic Representation, Idea Survivor, INSERT, Interactive Cloze, Sensible Sentence Highlighting, ThinkPair-Share 3-2-1 Review, Cornell Notes, Cubing, FFW, GIST, Graphic Representation, INSERT, Paired Reading, Think-PairShare

Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity 10. By the end of the year, read and 10. By the end of year, read and comprehend informational texts, including comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and history/social studies, science, and technical texts, in the grades technical texts, at the high end of the 4–5 text complexity band proficiently, grades 2–3 text complexity band with scaffolding as needed at the high end independently and proficiently. of the range.

10. By the end of the year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, at the high end of the grades 4–5 text complexity

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All MAX Teaching Strategies

SL

MAX Teaching and the CCSS - Speaking and Listening Standards 3–5

The following standards for 3–5 offer a focus for instruction each year to help ensure that students gain adequate mastery of a range of skills and applications. Students advancing through the grades are expected to meet each year’s grade-specific standards and retain or further develop skills and understandings mastered in preceding grades. Grade 3 Students: Comprehension and Collaboration 1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacherled) with diverse partners on grade 3 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

Grade 4 Students:

Grade 5 Students:

1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacherled) with diverse partners on grade 4 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacherled) with diverse partners on grade 5 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

3 Level Guide, AG, Extreme Paired Reading, Fiction Prediction, KWLS, GIST, Guided Reading Procedure, Hunt for Main Idea, Idea Survivor, INSERT, Interactive Cloze, Newlywed Notes, PreP, Think-Pair-Share

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion.

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion.

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion.

3 Level Guide, AG, Extreme Paired Reading, Fiction Prediction, KWLS, GIST, Guided Reading Procedure, Hunt for Main Idea, Idea Survivor, INSERT, Interactive Cloze, Newlywed Notes, PreP, Think-Pair-Share

b. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., gaining the floor in respectful ways, listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion).

b. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions and carry out assigned roles.

b. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions and carry out assigned roles.

3 Level Guide, AG, Extreme Paired Reading, Fiction Prediction, KWLS, GIST, Guided Reading Procedure, Hunt for Main Idea, Idea Survivor, INSERT, Interactive Cloze, Newlywed Notes, PreP, Think-Pair-Share

c. Ask questions to check understanding of information presented, stay on topic, and link their comments to the remarks of others.

c. Pose and respond to specific questions to clarify or follow up on information, and make comments that contribute to the discussion and link to the remarks of others.

c. Pose and respond to specific questions by making comments that contribute to the discussion and elaborate on the remarks of others.

3 Level Guide, AG, Bologna Sandwich, Cubing, KWLS, GIST, Guided Reading Procedure, Idea Survivor, INSERT, Interactive Cloze, Newlywed Notes, PreP, Stump the Teacher, Think-Pair-Share

d. Explain their own ideas and understanding in light of the discussion.

d. Review the key ideas expressed and explain their own ideas and understanding in light of the discussion.

d. Review the key ideas expressed and draw conclusions in light of information and knowledge gained from the discussions.

3 Level Guide, AG, Bologna Sandwich, Extreme Paired Reading, Fiction Prediction, KWLS, GIST, Guided Reading Procedure, Hunt for Main Idea, Idea Survivor, INSERT, Interactive Cloze, Newlywed Notes, PreP, Think-Pair-Share

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MAX Teaching Strategy

MAX Teaching and the CCSS Speaking and Listening Standards 3-5

SL

Grade 3 2. Determine the main ideas and supporting details of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.

Grade 4 2. Paraphrase portions of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.

Grade 5 2. Summarize a written text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.

MAX Teaching Strategy 3-2-1 Review, KWLS, Think-Pair-Share

3. Ask and answer questions about information from a speaker, offering appropriate elaboration and detail.

3. Identify the reasons and evidence a speaker provides to support particular points.

3. Summarize the points a speaker makes and explain how each claim is supported by reasons and evidence.

3 Level Guide, AG, Bologna Sandwich, Extreme Paired Reading, KWLS, GIST, Guided Reading Procedure, Hunt for Main Idea, Idea Survivor, INSERT, Interactive Cloze, Newlywed Notes, PreP, Think-Pair-Share

4. Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience in an organized manner, using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace. 5. Add audio recordings and visual displays to presentations when appropriate to enhance the development of main ideas or themes.

4. Report on a topic or text or present an opinion, sequencing ideas logically and using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace. 5. Include multimedia components (e.g., graphics, sound) and visual displays in presentations when appropriate to enhance the development of main ideas or themes.

3 Level Guide, AG, Bologna Sandwich, Extreme Paired Reading, Fiction Prediction, KWLS, GIST, Guided Reading Procedure, Hunt for Main Idea, Idea Survivor, INSERT, Interactive Cloze, Newlywed Notes, PreP, Think-Pair-Share

6. Differentiate between contexts that call for formal English (e.g., presenting ideas) and situations where informal discourse is appropriate (e.g., small-group discussion); use formal English when appropriate to task and situation. (See grade 4 Language standards 1 on pages 28 and 29 for specific expectations.)

6. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, using formal English when appropriate to task and situation. (See grade 5 Language standards 1 and 3 on pages 28 and 29 for specific expectations.)

All MAX Teaching strategies

Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas 4. Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience with appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details, speaking clearly at an understandable pace. 5. Create engaging audio recordings of stories or poems that demonstrate fluid reading at an understandable pace; add visual displays when appropriate to emphasize or enhance certain facts or details. 6. Speak in complete sentences when appropriate to task and situation in order to provide requested detail or clarification. (See grade 3 Language standards 1 and 3 on pages 28 and 29 for specific expectations.)

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~NOTES~

33

Special Plays Writing Information WRITING FOLDERS Writing Folders will be passed on to the middle schools. Each year, the following FIVE pieces should be added to the Writing Folders. Include ONLY the final copy and rubric. 1. Narrative 2. Informational/Explanatory 3. Argumentative/Opinion 4. October Benchmark Assessment 5. January Benchmark Assessment

The Oklahoma State Department of Education has stated that the 5th and 8th grade writing tests for February 2013 will be PASSAGE-BASED. The writing test will follow the format of the field test from 2012. Rubrics from the SDE are expected to be released in September 2012. Please check the SDE website (http://www.ok.gov/sde/) for the new rubrics. Definitions of the three CCSS modes of writing/text types are on pages 36-38. Writing Benchmarks will continue to be given during the same weeks as the Reading Benchmarks are administered. Each grade level will have a Writing Benchmark to complete. There will not be an “official” test booklet from the district. Passage-based prompts for each grade level will be given to the principals in time for the test. Students should use notebook paper to complete the response. Scoring will be up to each building, and there is no requirement to turn scores into the district.

34

The Common Core State Standards – Types of Writing The CCSS places all types of writing under three categories:

Narrative, Informational/Explanatory, and Argument. For a detailed description of each category, please see the following pages or visit http://www.corestandards.org/assets/Appendix_A.pdf. Narrative Writing • • • • • •

Creative Writing beyond Narrative “The narrative category does not include all of the possible forms of creative writing, such as many types of poetry. The Standards leave the inclusion and evaluation of other such forms to teacher discretion.”

Creative fictional stories Memoirs Anecdotes Autobiographies History/social studies – narrative accounts of individuals Science – narrative descriptions of the step-by-step procedures they follow in their investigations

Informational/Explanatory Writing Academic Genres • Literary analysis • Scientific and historical reports • Summaries • Précis writing (a brief summary)

Workplace and Functional Writing • Instructions • Manuals • Memos • Reports • Applications • Resumes

Argumentative Writing • • • •

ELA - make a claim about the worth or meaning of a literary work or works. Defend interpretations or judgments with evidence from the text(s). History/social studies -analyze evidence from multiple primary and secondary sources to advance a claim. Science - make claims in the form of statements or conclusions that answer questions or address problems. K-5 - the term “opinion” is used to refer to the developing form of argument.

35

Common Core State Standards

Writing Definitions of the Standards’ Three Text Types These definitions come directly from Appendix A of the Common Core State Standards website. http://www.corestandards.org/assets/Appendix_A.pdf

Narrative Writing Narrative writing conveys experience, either real or imaginary, and uses time as its deep structure. It can be used for many purposes, such as to inform, instruct, persuade, or entertain. In English language arts, students produce narratives that take the form of creative fictional stories, memoirs, anecdotes, and autobiographies. Over time, they learn to provide visual details of scenes, objects, or people; to depict specific actions (for example, movements, gestures, postures, and expressions); to use dialogue and interior monologue that provide insight into the narrator’s and characters’ personalities and motives; and to manipulate pace to highlight the significance of events and create tension and suspense. In history/social studies, students write narrative accounts about individuals. They also construct event models of what happened, selecting from their sources only the most relevant information. In science, students write narrative descriptions of the step-by-step procedures they follow in their investigations so that others can replicate their procedures and (perhaps) reach the same results. With practice, students expand their repertoire and control of different narrative strategies.

Creative Writing beyond Narrative The narrative category does not include all of the possible forms of creative writing, such as many types of poetry. The Standards leave the inclusion and evaluation of other such forms to teacher discretion.

36

Informational/Explanatory Writing

Informational/explanatory writing conveys information accurately. This kind of writing serves one or more closely related purposes: to increase readers’ knowledge of a subject, to help readers better understand a procedure or process, or to provide readers with an enhanced comprehension of a concept. Informational/explanatory writing addresses matters such as types (What are the different types of poetry?) and components (What are the parts of a motor?); size, function, or behavior (How big is the United States? What is an X-ray used for? How do penguins find food?); how things work (How does the legislative branch of government function?); and why things happen (Why do some authors blend genres?). To produce this kind of writing, students draw from what they already know and from primary and secondary sources. With practice, students become better able to develop a controlling idea and a coherent focus on a topic and more skilled at selecting and incorporating relevant examples, facts, and details into their writing. They are also able to use a variety of techniques to convey information, such as naming, defining, describing, or differentiating different types or parts; comparing or contrasting ideas or concepts; and citing an anecdote or a scenario to illustrate a point. Informational/explanatory writing includes a wide array of genres, including academic genres such as literary analyses, scientific and historical reports, summaries, and précis writing as well as forms of workplace and functional writing such as instructions, manuals, memos, reports, applications, and resumes. As students advance through the grades, they expand their repertoire of informational/explanatory genres and use them effectively in a variety of disciplines and domains. Although information is provided in both arguments and explanations, the two types of writing have different aims. Arguments seek to make people believe that something is true or to persuade people to change their beliefs or behavior. Explanations, on the other hand, start with the assumption of truthfulness and answer questions about why or how. Their aim is to make the reader understand rather than to persuade him or her to accept a certain point of view. In short, arguments are used for persuasion and explanations for clarification. Like arguments, explanations provide information about causes, contexts, and consequences of processes, phenomena, states of affairs, objects, terminology, and so on. However, in an argument, the writer not only gives information but also presents a case with the “pros” (supporting ideas) and “cons” (opposing ideas) on a debatable issue. Because an argument deals with whether the main claim is true, it demands empirical descriptive evidence, statistics, or definitions for support. When writing an argument, the writer supports his or her claim(s) with sound reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

Tier 1 and Tier 2 Academic Vocabulary for Informational Pieces 3rd – also, another, and, more, but 4th – another, for example, also, because 5th – in contrast, especially This vocabulary would be considered securely held content. For example, a middle school student should know how to use, and continue using, the phrase for example in writing informational pieces.

37

Argument Arguments are used for many purposes—to change the reader’s point of view, to bring about some action on the reader’s part, or to ask the reader to accept the writer’s explanation or evaluation of a concept, issue, or problem. An argument is a reasoned, logical way of demonstrating that the writer’s position, belief, or conclusion is valid. In English language arts, students make claims about the worth or meaning of a literary work or works. They defend their interpretations or judgments with evidence from the text(s) they are writing about. In history/social studies, students analyze evidence from multiple primary and secondary sources to advance a claim that is best supported by the evidence, and they argue for a historically or empirically situated interpretation. In science, students make claims in the form of statements or conclusions that answer questions or address problems. Using data in a scientifically acceptable form, students marshal evidence and draw on their understanding of scientific concepts to argue in support of their claims. Although young children are not able to produce fully developed logical arguments, they develop a variety of methods to extend and elaborate their work by providing examples, offering reasons for their assertions, and explaining cause and effect. These kinds of expository structures are steps on the road to argument. In grades K–5, the term “opinion” is used to refer to this developing form of argument. Tier 1 and Tier 2 Academic Vocabulary for Argument (Opinion) Pieces K – My favorite book is 1st – No example given 2nd – because, and, also 3rd – because, therefore, since, for example 4th – for instance, in order to, and in addition 5th – consequently, specifically This vocabulary would be considered securely held content. For example, a middle school student should know how to use, and continue using, the phrase for example in writing informational pieces. The Special Place of Argument in the CCSS While all three text types are important, the Standards put particular emphasis on students’ ability to write sound arguments on substantive topics and issues, as this ability is critical to college and career readiness. English and education professor Gerald Graff (2003) writes that “argument literacy” is fundamental to being educated. The university is largely an “argument culture,” Graff contends; therefore, K–12 schools should “teach the conflicts” so that students are adept at understanding and engaging in argument (both oral and written) when they enter college. He claims that because argument is not standard in most school curricula, only 20 percent of those who enter college are prepared in this respect. Theorist and critic Neil Postman (1997) calls argument the soul of an education because argument forces a writer to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of multiple perspectives. When teachers ask students to consider two or more perspectives on a topic or issue, something far beyond surface knowledge is required: students must think critically and deeply, assess the validity of their own thinking, and anticipate counterclaims in opposition to their own assertions. “Argument” and “Persuasion” When writing to persuade, writers employ a variety of persuasive strategies. One common strategy is an appeal to the credibility, character, or authority of the writer (or speaker). When writers establish that they are knowledgeable and trustworthy, audiences are more likely to believe what they say. Another is an appeal to the audience’s self-interest, sense of identity, or emotions, any of which can sway an audience. A logical argument, on the other hand, convinces the audience because of the perceived merit and reasonableness of the claims and proofs offered rather than either the emotions the writing evokes in the audience or the character or credentials of the writer. The Standards place special emphasis on writing logical arguments as a particularly important form of college- and career-ready writing.

38

Revised Publishers’ Criteria for the Common Core State Standards in English Language Arts and Literacy, Grades 3–12 David Coleman • Susan Pimentel IV. Key Criteria for Writing to Sources and Research 1. Materials portray writing to sources as a key task. The Common Core State Standards require students not only to show that they can analyze and synthesize sources but also to present careful analysis, well-defended claims, and clear information through their writing. Several of the Writing Standards, including most explicitly Standard 9, require students to draw evidence from a text or texts to support analysis, reflection, or research. Materials aligned with the Common Core State Standards should give students extensive opportunities to write in response to sources throughout grade-level materials. Model rubrics for the writing assignments as well as high-quality student samples should also be provided as guidance to teachers. 2. Materials focus on forming arguments as well as informative writing. While narrative writing is given prominence in early grades, as students progress through the grades the Common Core State Standards increasingly ask students to write arguments or informational reports from sources. As a consequence, less classroom time should be spent in later grades on personal writing in response to decontextualized prompts that ask students to detail personal experiences or opinions. The Common Core State Standards require that the balance of writing students are asked to do parallel the balance assessed on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP): •

• •

In elementary school, 30 percent of student writing should be to argue, 35 percent should be to explain/inform, and 35 percent should be narrative. In middle school, 35 percent of student writing should be to write arguments, 35 percent should be to explain/inform, and 30 percent should be narrative. In high school, 40 percent of student writing should be to write arguments, 40 percent should be to explain/inform, and 20 percent should be narrative.

These forms of writing are not strictly independent; for example, arguments and explanations often include narrative elements, and both informing and arguing rely on using information or evidence drawn from texts.

39

3. Materials make it clear that student writing should be responsive to the needs of the audience and the particulars of the text in question. As the standards are silent on length and structure, student writing should not be evaluated by whether it follows a particular format or formula (e.g., the five paragraph essay). Instead, the Common Core State Standards have been carefully designed to focus on the elements or characteristics of good writing including drawing sufficient evidence from texts, writing coherently with well-developed ideas, and writing clearly with sufficient command of standard English. 4.

Students are given extensive practice with short, focused research projects. Writing Standard 7 emphasizes that students should conduct several short research projects in addition to more sustained research efforts. Materials should require several of these short research projects annually to enable students to repeat the research process many times and develop the expertise needed to conduct research independently. A progression of shorter research projects also encourages students to develop expertise in one area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of the same topic as well as other texts and source materials on that topic.

V. Additional Key Criteria for Student Reading, Writing, Listening, and Speaking 4. Materials embrace the most significant grammar and language conventions. The Language Standards provide a focus for instruction each year to ensure that students gain adequate mastery of the essential “rules” of standard written and spoken English. They also push students to learn how to approach language as a matter of craft so they can communicate clearly and powerfully. In addition to meeting each year’s grade-specific standards, students are expected to retain and further develop skills and understandings mastered in preceding grades. Thus, aligned materials should demonstrate that they explicitly and effectively support student mastery of the full range of grammar and conventions as they are applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts. The materials should also indicate when students should adhere to formal conventions and when they are speaking and writing for a less formal purpose.

Coleman, David, and Susan Pimentel. "Publishers’ Criteria for the Common Core State Standards in English Language Arts and Literacy, Grades 3–12." n. page. Web. 30 Jan. 2012. 40

Timed Writing Tips Students should be taught to first analyze the prompt. After all, if they don’t know what they are supposed to be writing about, how can they write? Analyzing the prompt forces them to get something on their paper. Have students write the following on the top of their brainstorming page, every time they begin writing. Form: Audience: Purpose: To If you cannot answer those three questions, you will not be able to properly respond to the prompt. When first teaching this step, it is beneficial to have students analyze several prompts before even beginning a timed writing. The following example is from the Sample Performance Tasks for Informational Texts from the Common Core State Standards website. This is a 3rd grade prompt. Students explain how the main idea that Lincoln had “many faces” in Russell Freedman’s Lincoln: A Photobiography is supported by key details in the text. Form: Informational/Explanatory Text Audience: People interested in Abraham Lincoln. Purpose: To explain how Lincoln had “many faces” using details from Lincoln: A Photobiography. Now that students have analyzed the prompt, they should be ready to start brainstorming. Hopefully they keep the purpose in mind, and do not write a summary of Lincoln: A Photobiography. This prompt is an example so you, the teacher, know what type of prompt our students will be given when the CCSS are implemented in 2014. Once students have analyzed the prompt, they should begin brainstorming. Teach students several ways to brainstorm – lists, webs, outlining, etc. Give students time guidelines. For example, write the following on the board: 10 minutes – Analyze Prompt & Brainstorm 15 minutes – Write 5 minutes – Revise & Edit The times can be adjusted according to the level of your students and the time you have available. It is suggested that timed writings occur once a week. Students will need to get into the practice of making their first copy their only copy during a timed writing. Skipping lines when writing is good practice. If a word or sentence needs to be added, the insert symbol and the space above the line will provide ample space. Wondering how to grade? This is up to teacher discretion. If it is one of the first times, maybe students earn their grade by completing all the steps. Maybe another time they are graded on having complete sentences or paragraphs. A grade could also be given for having a main idea and supporting details. Each timed writing does not need to be graded as a complete essay. Take whichever concept you have been working on and grade that concept. It is very important to let students know BEFORE they write how they will be graded. 41

Another Strategy – RAFTS What’s your Role?

RAFT

What’s your Audience? What’s your Format?

Role

What’s your Topic?

Audience Audience

What’s your Strong verb? Format Topic For more information on using RAFTS, visit http://olc.spsd.sk.ca/de/pd/instr/strats/raft/ Book Reference The Reading Teacher’s Book of Lists* by Edward B. Fry, Ph.D and Jacqueline E. Kress, Ed.D. Over 200 updated and new lists –topics include Fluency Strategies Internet Resources

Writing Prompts Reading in the Content Areas

*Refer to a reading coach for access to a copy of this book.

Writing Resources Creative writing prompts for every day of the year. http://www.theteacherscorner.net/daily-writing-prompts/ Home of the interactive writing prompts http://writingfix.com/ 6+1 Trait® Writing Prompts http://educationnorthwest.org/resource/514 Click on “The Writing Teacher’s Strategy Guide” http://www.ttms.org/ Argument & Persuasive Writing: Lesson plans and teaching resources http://www.webenglishteacher.com/argument.html 42

The rubric on the following page is what the OK SDE has used in the past to grade the 5th grade writing tests. The NEW RUBRICS for the new format of passage-based prompts should be online in September 2012. The following rubrics can be used or tweaked to meet the needs of your classroom.

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OKLAHOMA ANALYTIC SCORING RUBRIC - OKLAHOMA WRITING ASSESSMENT 5TH GRADE OCCT Student's Name_____________________________________________Topic/Prompt_________________________________________________________________________ Score 4 3 2 1

Ideas and Development - 30% The content is well suited for the audience and purpose; main idea or thesis is clear; ideas are fully developed and elaborated using details, examples, reasons, or evidence; writer expresses an insightful perspective towards the topic The content is adequate for audience and purpose; main idea is evident but may lack clarity; ideas are developed using some details, examples, reasons, and/or evidence; writer sustains his/her perspective toward the topic throughout most of the composition The content is inconsistent with audience and purpose; main idea is not focused and leaves the reader with questions; must infer to understand; ideas are minimally developed with few details; may simply be a list of ideas; writer has difficulty expressing his/her perspective toward topic The content is irrelevant to the audience and purpose; lacks a central idea; ideas lack development or may be repetitive; writer has little or no perspective on topic

Comment:

Score 4

Score 4 3 2 1

Organization, Unity, and Coherence - 25% Introduction engages the reader; sustained or consistent focus on the topic; logical and appropriate sequencing and balanced with smooth, effective transitions; order and structure are strong and move the reader through the text; conclusion is satisfying

Score 4

Evident introduction to the topic; adequate focus; adequate sequencing; stays on topic with little digression; uses limited but effective transitions; order and structure are present; conclusion is appropriate

3

2

May lack a clear organizational structure; weak evidence of unity; little or limited sequencing and/or transitions; details may be randomly placed

2

1

Lacks logical direction; no evidence of organizational structure

1

Comment:

3 2 1

Writing clearly demonstrates appropriate sentence structure; writing has few or no run-on or fragment errors; writing has a rich variety of sentence structure, types, and lengths; ideas are organized into paragraphs that blend into larger text; evidence of appropriate paragraphing Writing adequately demonstrates appropriate sentence structure; writing may contain a small number of run-on or fragment errors that do not interfere with fluency; writing has adequate variety of sentence structure; ideas may be organized into paragraphs Writing demonstrates lack of control in sentence structure; writing contains errors such as run-ons and fragments that interfere with fluency; writing has limited variety of sentence structure; writing may show little or no attempt at paragraphing Inappropriate sentence structure; many errors in structure (run-ons, fragments); no variety in structure; no attempt at paragraphing

Comment:

3

Score 4

Sentences and Paragraphs - 15%

Word Choice - 15% Appropriate word choice which conveys the correct meaning and appeals to the audience in an interesting, precise, and natural way; the writing may be characterized by, but not limited to lively verbs, vivid nouns, imaginative adjectives, figurative language, dialogue; no vague, overused, repetitive language is used (a lot, great, very, really); ordinary words used in an unusual way Words generally convey the intended message; the writer uses a variety of words that are appropriate but do not necessarily energize the writing; the writing may be characterized by attempts at figurative language and dialogue, some use of lively verbs, vivid nouns, and imaginative adjectives, few vague, overused, and repetitive words are used Word choice lacks precision and variety or may be inappropriate to the audience and purpose; may be simplistic and/or vague; relies on overused or vague language (a lot, great, very, really); few attempts at figurative language and dialogue; word choice is unimaginative and colorless with images that are unclear or absent Word choice indicates an extremely limited or inaccurate vocabulary; no attempts at figurative language; general, vague words that fail to communicate meaning; text may be too short to demonstrate variety

Comment:

Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics - 15% The writer demonstrates appropriate use of correct spelling, punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage; errors are minor and do not affect readability The writer demonstrates adequate use of correct spelling, punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage; errors may be more noticeable but do not significantly affect readability The writer demonstrates minimal use of correct spelling, punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage; errors may be distracting and interfere with readability The writer demonstrates very limited use of correct spelling, punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage; errors are numerous and severely impede readability

Comment:

Students, test your score against the state formula: To calculate, multiply the weights by the trait scores. Sum up all of the weighted trait scores. Multiply 1.38494 by the sum of the weighted trait scores. Then add 0.29278. The final number is the writing score. Drop any numbers after the decimal point. 1 (Unsatisfactory) 2, 3 (Limited Knowledge) 4 (Satisfactory) 5, 6 (Advanced) (Must have 4, 5, or 6 to pass) Analytic Traits Weight Trait Score Weighted Trait Score Ideas and Development .30 x = Organization, Unity, and Coherence .25 x = Sentences and Paragraphs .15 x = Word Choice .15 x = Grammar, Usage, and Mechanics .15 x = Sum = _____ _____(Sum) x 1.38494 + 0.29278 = _____ (Composite [Final] Score) sde.state.ok.us 12-05

OK State Department of Education Writing Assessment 5TH GR. OCCT 12-05

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The following rubric can be found in any teacher’s edition of the basal behind the red tabs. That section also contains rubrics that are on a three and four point scale.

Explanatory/Informational (Expository) Writing Scoring Rubric 5 Excellent, focused exposition; well elaborated with quality details

4

3

2 Sometimes unfocused exposition; needs more supporting details

Look in your teacher’s guide!

1

Informed focused exposition; elaborate with telling details

Generally focused exposition; some supporting details

Logical, consistent flow of ideas; good transitions

Logical sequencing of ideas; uses transitions

Sequenced ideas with some transitions

Little direction from beginning to end; few order words

Lacks structure and transitions

Writer closely involved; informative voice well suited to topic

Reveals personality; voice suited to topic

Sincere voice suited to topic

Little writer involvement, personality

Careless writing with no feeling

Word Choice

Vivid, precise words to express ideas

Clear words to express ideas

Language adequate but may lack precision

Generally limited or redundant language

Vague, dull, or misused words

Sentences

Strong topic sentence; fluent, varied structures

Good topic sentence; smooth sentence structure

Topic sentence correctly constructed; some sentence variety

Topic sentence is unclear or missing; wordy, awkward sentences

No topic sentence; many incomplete or run-on sentences

Excellent control; few of no errors

No serious errors to affect understanding

Reasonable control; few distracting errors

Weak control; enough errors to affect understanding

Many errors that prevent understanding

Focus/Ideas

Organization/ Paragraphs

Voice

Conventions

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Rambling exposition; lacks development and detail

Look in your teacher’s guide!

The following rubric can be found in any teacher’s edition of the basal behind the red tabs. That section also contains rubrics that are on a three and four point scale.

Narrative Writing Scoring Rubric Focus/Ideas

Organization/ Paragraphs

Voice

Word Choice

Sentences

Conventions

5 Excellent, focused narrative; well elaborated with quality details Strong beginning, middle, end; appropriate order words

4

3

2

1

Sometimes unfocused narrative; needs more supporting details

Rambling narrative; lacks development and detail

Good, focused narrative; elaborate with telling details

Generally focused narrative; some supporting details

Coherent beginning, middle, and end; some order words

Recognizable Little direction from beginning, middle, and beginning to end; few end; some order order words words

Writer closely involved; engaging personality

Reveals personality

Sincere voice but not fully engaged

Little writer involvement, personality

Careless writing with no feeling

Vivid, precise words that bring story to life

Clear words to bring story to life

Language adequate but lacks color

Generally limited or redundant language

Vague, dull, or misused words

Excellent variety of sentences; natural rhythm

Varied lengths, styles; generally smooth

Correctly constructed sentences; some variety

May have simple, Choppy; many awkward, or wordy incomplete or run-on sentences; little variety sentences

Excellent control; few of no errors

No serious errors to affect understanding

Reasonable control; few distracting errors

Weak control; enough errors to affect understanding

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Lacks beginning, middle, end; incorrect or no order words

Many errors that prevent understanding

The following rubric can be found in any teacher’s edition of the basal behind the red tabs. That section also contains rubrics that are on a three and four point scale.

Descriptive Writing Scoring Rubric

Focus/Ideas

Organization/ Paragraphs

Voice

Word Choice

Sentences

Conventions

5 Excellent, focused description; well elaborated with quality details Compelling ideas enhanced by order, structure, and transitions

4 Good, focused description; elaborated with telling details

3 Generally focused description; some supporting details

Look in your teacher’s guide!

2 Sometimes unfocused description; needs more supporting details

1 Rambling description; lacks development and detail

Appealing order, structure, and transitions

Adequate order, structure, and some transitions to guide reader

Little direction from beginning to end; few transitions

Lacks direction and identifiable structure; no transitions

Writer closely involved; engaging personality

Reveals personality

Sincere voice but not fully engaged

Little writer involvement, personality

Careless writing with no feeling

Vivid, precise words that create memorable pictures

Clear, interesting words to bring description to life

Language adequate; appeals to senses

Generally limited or redundant language

Vague, dull, or misused words

Excellent variety of sentences; natural rhythm

Varied lengths, styles; generally smooth

Carefully constructed sentences; some variety

Simple, awkward, or wordy sentences; little variety

Choppy; many incomplete or run-on sentences

Excellent control; few or no errors

No serious errors to affect understanding

Reasonable control; few distracting errors

Weak control; enough errors to affect understanding

Many errors that prevent understanding

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Look in your teacher’s guide!

The following rubric can be found in any teacher’s edition of the basal behind the red tabs. That section also contains rubrics that are on a three and four point scale.

Persuasive Writing Scoring Rubric 5 Persuasive argument carefully built with quality details with counterpoint

4 Persuasive argument well supported with details including counterpoint

Information chosen and arranged for maximum effect

3

2

1 Rambling persuasive argument; lacks development and detail

Persuasive argument with one or two convincing details

Persuasive piece sometimes unfocused; needs more support

Evident progression of persuasive ideas

Information arranged in a logical way with some lapses

Little structure or direction

No identifiable structure

Voice

Writer closely involved; persuasive but not overbearing

Maintains persuasive tone

Sometimes uses persuasive voice

Little writer involvement, personality

Shows little conviction

Word Choice

Persuasive words carefully chosen for impact

Argument supported by persuasive language

Occasional persuasive language

Generally limited or redundant language

Vague, dull, or misused words; no persuasive words

Sentences

Excellent variety of sentences; natural rhythm

Varied lengths, styles; generally smooth

Carefully constructed sentences; some variety

Simple, awkward, or wordy sentences; little variety

Choppy; many incomplete or run-on sentences

Excellent control; few or no errors

No serious errors to affect understanding

Reasonable control; few distracting errors

Weak control; enough errors to affect understanding

Many errors that prevent understanding

Focus/Ideas

Organization/ Paragraphs

Conventions

48

Common Core State Standards Writing Standards * Stands for securely held content (meaning it should carry over into the next year). This is different from the Oklahoma C3 where the * stands for untested material. Grade 3

Text Types and Purposes 1. Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons. a. Introduce the topic or text they are writing about, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure that lists reasons. b. Provide reasons that support the opinion. c. Use linking words and phrases (e.g., because, therefore, since, for example) to connect opinion and reasons. d. Provide a concluding statement or section.

Grade 4

Grade 5

Text Types and Purposes 1. Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information.

Grade 6

Text Types and Purposes Text Types and Purposes 1. Write opinion pieces on topics 1. Write arguments to support or texts, supporting a point of view claims with clear reasons and with reasons and information. relevant evidence. a. Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure in which ideas are logically grouped to support the writer’s purpose.

a. Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure in which related ideas are grouped to support the writer’s purpose.

b. Provide logically ordered reasons that are supported by facts and details.

b. Provide reasons that are supported by facts and details.

c. Link opinion and reasons using words, phrases, and clauses (e.g., consequently, specifically).

c. Link opinion and reasons using words and phrases (e.g., for instance, in order to, in addition).

d. Provide a concluding statement or section related to the opinion presented.

d. Provide a concluding statement or section related to the opinion presented.

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a. Introduce claim(s) and organize the reasons and evidence clearly. b. Support claim(s) with clear reasons and relevant evidence, using credible sources and demonstrating an understanding of the topic or text. c. Use words, phrases, and clauses to clarify the relationships among claim(s) and reasons. d. Establish and maintain a formal style. e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from the argument presented.

Grade 3

Grade 4

Grade 5

2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.

2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.

2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.

a. Introduce a topic and group related information together; include illustrations when useful to aiding comprehension. b. Develop the topic with facts, definitions, and details.

a. Introduce a topic clearly and group related information in paragraphs and sections; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

a. Introduce a topic clearly, provide a general observation and focus, and group related information logically; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

c. Use linking words and phrases (e.g., also, another, and, more, but) to connect ideas within categories of information.

b. Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic.

b. Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic.

d. Provide a concluding statement or section.

c. Link ideas within categories of information using words and phrases (e.g., another, for example, also, because).

c. Link ideas within and across categories of information using words, phrases, and clauses (e.g., in contrast, especially).

d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.

d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.

e. Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or explanation presented.

e. Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or explanation presented.

Grade 6

2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content. a. Introduce a topic; organize ideas, concepts, and information, using strategies such as definition, classification, comparison/contrast, and cause/effect; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. b. Develop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples. c. Use appropriate transitions to clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts. d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic. e. Establish and maintain a formal style. f. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from the information or explanation presented.

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Grade 3

Grade 4

Grade 5

Grade 6

3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.

3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.

3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.

3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and wellstructured event sequences.

a. Establish a situation and introduce a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally.

a. Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally.

a. Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally.

a. Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically.

b. Use dialogue and description to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations.

b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, description, and pacing, to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations.

b. Use dialogue and descriptions of actions, thoughts, and feelings to develop experiences and events or show the response of characters to situations. c. Use temporal words and phrases to signal event order. d. Provide a sense of closure.

c. Use a variety of transitional words and phrases to manage the sequence of events.

c. Use a variety of transitional words, phrases, and clauses to manage the sequence of events.

d. Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and events precisely.

d. Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and events precisely.

e. Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events.

e. Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events.

b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters. c. Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts from one time frame or setting to another. d. Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to convey experiences and events. e. Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events.

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Grade 3

Grade 4

Grade 5

Grade 6

Production and Distribution of Writing 4. With guidance and support from adults, produce writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task and purpose. (Gradespecific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)

Production and Distribution of Writing 4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)

Production and Distribution of Writing 4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)

Production and Distribution of Writing 4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)

5. With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing.

5. With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing.

6. With guidance and support from adults, use technology to produce and publish writing (using keyboarding skills) as well as to interact and collaborate with others.

6. With some guidance and support from adults, use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to type a minimum of one page in a single sitting.

5. With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach. 6. With some guidance and support from adults, use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to type a minimum of two pages in a single sitting.

5. With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach. 6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to type a minimum of three pages in a single sitting.

Research to Build and Present Knowledge 7. Conduct short research projects that build knowledge about a topic.

Research to Build and Present Knowledge 7. Conduct short research projects that build knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic.

Research to Build and Present Knowledge 7. Conduct short research projects that use several sources to build knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic.

Research to Build and Present Knowledge 7. Conduct short research projects to answer a question, drawing on several sources and refocusing the inquiry when appropriate.

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Grade 3

Grade 4

Grade 5

Grade 6

8. Recall information from experiences or gather information from print and digital sources; take brief notes on sources and sort evidence into provided categories.

8. Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from print and digital sources; take notes and categorize information, and provide a list of sources.

8. Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from print and digital sources; summarize or paraphrase information in notes and finished work, and provide a list of sources.

8. Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources; assess the credibility of each source; and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and providing basic bibliographic information for sources.

9. (Begins in grade 4)

9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

a. Apply grade 4 Reading standards to literature

a. Apply grade 5 Reading standards to literature (e.g., “Compare and contrast

a. Apply grade 6 Reading standards to literature (e.g., “Compare and contrast

(e.g., “Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text [e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions].”).

two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or a drama, drawing on specific details in the text [e.g., how characters interact]”).

texts in different forms or genres [e.g., stories and poems; historical novels and fantasy stories] in terms of their approaches to similar themes and topics”).

b. Apply grade 5 Reading standards to informational texts

b. Apply grade 4 Reading standards to informational texts

(e.g., “Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text, identifying which reasons and evidence support which point[s]”).

b. Apply grade 6 Reading standards to literary nonfiction

(e.g., “Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text”).

Range of Writing 10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Range of Writing 10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Range of Writing 10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time or research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences. 53

(e.g., “Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, distinguishing claims that are supported by reasons and evidence from claims that are not”).

Range of Writing 10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Common Core State Standards Language Standards * Stands for securely held content (meaning it should carry over into the next year). This is different from the Oklahoma C3 where the * stands for untested material. Grade 3

Grade 4

Grade 5

Grade 6

Conventions of Standard English 1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

Conventions of Standard English 1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

Conventions of Standard English 1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

Conventions of Standard English 1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

a. Explain the function of nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs in general and their functions in particular sentences.

a. Use relative pronouns (who, whose, whom, which, that) and relative adverbs (where, when, why).

a. Use collective nouns (e.g., group).

a. Ensure that pronouns are in the proper case (subjective, objective, possessive).

b. Form and use regular and irregular plural nouns.

b. Form and use the progressive (e.g., I was walking; I am walking; I will be walking) verb tenses.

c. Use abstract nouns (e.g., childhood).

b. Form and use frequently occurring irregular plural nouns (e.g., feet, children, teeth, mice, fish).

d. Form and use regular and irregular verbs.

c. Use modal auxiliaries (e.g., can, may, must) to convey various conditions.

e. Form and use the simple (e.g., I walked; I walk; I will walk) verb tenses.

d. Order adjectives within sentences according to conventional patterns (e.g., a small red bag rather than a red small bag).

e. Form and use prepositional phrases.

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b. Use intensive pronouns (e.g., myself, ourselves).

c. Use reflexive pronouns (e.g., myself, ourselves).

c. Recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in pronoun number and person.*

d. Form and use the past tense of frequently occurring irregular verbs (e.g., sat, hid, told).

d. Recognize and correct vague pronouns (i.e., ones with unclear or ambiguous antecedents).*

e. Use adjectives and adverbs, and choose between them depending on what is to be modified.

e. Recognize variations from standard English in their own and others’ writing and speaking, and identify and use strategies to improve expression in conventional language.*

Grade 3

f. Ensure subject-verb and pronoun-antecedent agreement.* g. Form and use comparative and superlative adjectives and adverbs, and choose between them depending on what is to be modified.

Grade 4

Grade 5

Grade 6

f. Produce complete sentences, recognizing and correcting inappropriate fragments and runons.*

f. Produce, expand, and rearrange complete simple and compound sentences (e.g., The boy watched the movie; The little boy watched the movie; The action g. Correctly use frequently movie was watched by the little confused words (e.g., to, too, two; boy). there, their).*

h. Use coordinating and subordinating conjunctions. i. Produce simple, compound, and complex sentences. 2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

a. Capitalize appropriate words in titles.

a. Use correct capitalization.

a. Capitalize holidays, product names, and geographic names.

a. Use punctuation (commas, parentheses, dashes) to set off nonrestrictive/parenthetical elements.*

b. Use commas in addresses. c. Use commas and quotation marks in dialogue. d. Form and use possessives. e. Use conventional spelling for high-frequency and other studied words and for adding suffixes to base words (e.g., sitting, smiled, cries, happiness).

b. Use commas and quotation marks to mark direct speech and quotations from a text.

b. Use commas in greetings and closings of letters.

c. Use a comma before a coordinating conjunction in a compound sentence.

c. Use an apostrophe to form contractions and frequently occurring possessives.

b. Spell correctly.

d. Spell grade-appropriate words d. Generalize learned spelling correctly, consulting references as patterns when writing words (e.g., needed. cage →badge; boy →boil).

55

Grade 3

Grade 4

f. Use spelling patterns and generalizations (e.g., word families, position-based spellings, syllable patterns, ending rules, meaningful word parts) in writing words.

Grade 5

Grade 6

e. Consult reference materials, including beginning dictionaries, as needed to check and correct spellings.

g. Consult reference materials, including beginning dictionaries, as needed to check and correct spellings. Knowledge of Language 3. Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening. a. Choose words and phrases for effect.*

Knowledge of Language 3. Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.

Knowledge of Language 3. Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.

Knowledge of Language 3. Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.

a. Choose words and phrases to convey ideas precisely.*

a. Expand, combine, and reduce sentences for meaning, reader/listener interest, and style.

a. Vary sentence patterns for meaning, reader/ listener interest, and style.*

b. Compare and contrast the varieties of English (e.g., dialects, registers) used in stories, dramas, or poems.

b. Maintain consistency in style and tone.*

b. Choose punctuation for effect.* b. Recognize and observe c. Differentiate between contexts differences between the conventions of spoken and written that call for formal English (e.g., presenting ideas) and situations standard English. where informal discourse is appropriate (e.g., small-group discussion).

56

C3 (PASS) Writing/Grammar/Usage and Mechanics - 3rd GRADE Writing/Grammar/Usage and Mechanics. The student will express ideas effectively in written modes for a variety of purposes and audiences. *Standard 1: Writing Process. The student will use the writing process to write coherently. 1. Use a variety of prewriting activities such as brainstorming, clustering, illustrating, using graphic organizers, and webbing. 2. Understand and demonstrate familiarity with the writing process and format of main idea. 3. Compose coherent first drafts with clear focus of beginning, middle, and ending. 4. Revise drafts, changing or adding details and vivid, descriptive words. 5. Proofread/edit writing, using standard editing marks, with peers or teacher. 6. Publish and present writing to peers or adults. *Standard 2: Modes and Forms of Writing. Communicate through a variety of written forms (modes), for various purposes, and to a specific audience or person. 1. Communicate through a variety of written modes for various audiences and purposes to inform, entertain, describe, persuade, and to reflect. 2. Write simple narrative, descriptive, persuasive, and creative paragraphs. 3. Write descriptive and creative stories and poems about people, places, things, or experiences that: a. develop a main idea. b. use details to support the main idea. c. have a clear beginning, middle, and ending. 4. Write informational pieces using one reference source and citing the title and author of the source. 5. Write personal, and formal letters, thank-you notes, and invitations including the date, greeting, body, closing, and signature. 6. Write various modes of simple poems. 7. Write narratives that: a. provide a context within which an action occurs. b. include details that develop the plot. c. provide a clear beginning, middle, and end that includes details that develop around a central idea. 8. Use descriptive language such as action verbs, vivid adjectives, and adverbs to make writing interesting. *Standard 3: Grammar/Usage and Mechanics. The student will demonstrate appropriate practices in writing by applying standard English conventions to the revising and editing stages of writing. 1. Grammar/Usage: Students are expected to recognize and correctly use nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, conjunctions, and contractions in their writing. a. Singular, plural, and possessive forms of nouns b. Common and proper nouns c. Subjective (Nominative), objective, and possessive pronouns d. Present, past, and future tense verbs e. Regular, irregular, and helping (auxiliary) verbs f. Past participle of verbs g. Subject-verb agreement h. Positive, comparative, and superlative adjectives i. Time, place, and manner adverbs j. Coordinating conjunctions 57

2. Mechanics: Students are expected to demonstrate appropriate language mechanics in writing. a. Correctly capitalize geographical names, holidays, dates, proper nouns, book titles, titles of respect, sentences, and quotations. b. Correctly indent at the beginning of each paragraph. c. Observe left and right hand margins. 3. Punctuation: Students are expected to demonstrate appropriate punctuation in writing. a. Periods in abbreviations and sentence endings (terminal punctuation) b. Question and exclamation marks c. Commas in dates, addresses, locations, quotes, introductory words, words in a series, greetings, and closings in a letter d. Apostrophes in contractions and possessives e. Colon in notation of time, formal letter writing, and the introduction of words or concepts in a series, (e.g., bring the following supplies: glue, paper, scissors, etc.) f. Quotation marks around direct quotations, the titles of individual poems, and short stories 4. Sentence Structure: The student will demonstrate appropriate sentence structure in writing. a. Correctly write the four basic kinds of sentences (declarative, exclamatory, imperative, and interrogative) with terminal puncutation. b. Begin to use simple, compound, and complex sentences appropriately in writing. 5. Spelling: Students are expected to demonstrate appropriate application of spelling knowledge to the revising and editing stages of writing. a. Demonstrate recall of spelling patterns (e.g., grapheme or blend), consonant doubling (e.g., bat + ed = batted), changing the ending of a word from –y to –ies when forming the plural (e.g., carry = carries), and common homophones (e.g., hair/hare). b. Spell phonetically regular multisyllabic words, contractions, and compounds. c. Increase the number of high frequency words spelled correctly. d. Spell words ending in –tion and –sion correctly. e. Use various sources of materials to check and correct spelling. 6. Handwriting: Students are expected to demonstrate appropriate handwriting in the writing process. a. use handwriting/penmanship to copy and/or compose text using correct formation of letters. b. use correct spacing of letters and words in manuscript and cursive writing.

58

C3 (PASS) Writing/Grammar/Usage and Mechanics – 4th GRADE Writing/grammar/usage and mechanics. The student will express ideas effectively in written modes for a variety of purposes and audiences. * Standard 1: Writing Process. The student will use the writing process to write coherently. 1. Use a variety of prewriting activities such as brainstorming, clustering, illustrating, webbing, and using graphic organizers. 2. Understand and demonstrate familiarity with writing process/format of beginning, middle, and ending. 3. Use common organizational structures for providing information in writing, such as chronological order (beginning, middle, and end), cause/effect, or similarity and difference, and posing and answering questions. 4. Select a focus and an organizational structure based upon purpose, audience, and required format. 5. Write one or more drafts by categorizing ideas, organizing them into paragraphs, and blending paragraphs in to longer text. 6. Revise selected drafts by adding, elaborating, deleting, combining, and rearranging text. 7. Edit/proofread drafts, using standard editing marks, to ensure standard usage, mechanics, spelling, and varied sentence structure. 8. Publish and present writing to peers and adults. * Standard 2: Modes and Forms of Writing. Communicate through a variety of written forms, for various purposes, and to a specific audience or person. 1. Communicate through a variety of written modes and for various audiences to inform, persuade, entertain, and reflect. 2. Write narrative, creative, descriptive, expository, and persuasive paragraphs and longer compositions that: a. have topic sentences. b. use concrete sensory supporting details. c. provide a context to allow the reader to imagine the event. d. support a logical conclusion. 3. Write creative stories and poems using figurative language (alliteration, personification, simile, and metaphor) and varied word choice to make writing interesting and engaging to audience. 4. Write personal, and formal letters, thank-you notes, and invitations including, the date, greeting, body, closing, and signature. 5. Write informational pieces with multiple paragraphs that: a. provide an introductory paragraph that asks a central question about an idea or issue. b. establish and support a central theme or idea with a topic sentence. c. include supporting paragraphs with simple facts, details, and explanations for focus. d. present important ideas and events in sequence, chronological order, or order of importance. e. provide details and transitions to link paragraphs. f. conclude with a paragraph that summarizes the points. g. use correct indention at the beginning of paragraphs and to indicate dialogue. h. use more than one source of information, including speakers, books, newspapers, media sources, and online information citing source title, author, and page numbers, if applicable. 6. Write responses to literature that: a. demonstrate an understanding of a literary work. b. support judgments by referring to both the text and prior knowledge. 7. Write summaries based upon the main idea of a reading selection and its most significant details. 59

* Standard 3: Grammar/Usage and Mechanics. The student will demonstrate appropriate practices in writing by applying Standard English conventions to the revising and editing stages of writing. 1. Grammar/Usage: Students are expected to recognize and use nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, contractions, and conjunctions correctly in their writing. a. Singular, plural, and possessive forms of nouns b. Common and proper nouns c. Nominative (subjective), objective, reflexive, intensive, and possessive pronouns d. Subject, direct object, and object of prepositions e. Present, past, future, past participle, and present perfect verbs tense f. Regular, irregular, and auxiliary (helping) verbs g. Simple and complete predicate h. Positive, comparative, and superlative adjectives i. Time, place, manner, and degree adverbs j. Comparative forms of adverbs k. Coordinating and correlating conjunctions l. Restrictive (essential) and nonrestrictive (nonessential) clauses m. prepositional and participial phrases n. Subject-verb agreement 2. Mechanics: Students are expected to demonstrate appropriate language mechanics in writing. a. Correctly capitalize the first word of a sentence, the pronoun ―I,‖ geographical names, holidays, dates, proper nouns, book titles, titles of respect, sentences, and quotations. b. Capitalize correctly familial relations, proper adjectives, and conventions of letter writing. c. Indent correctly at the beginning of each paragraph. d. Observe left and right hand margins. 3. Punctuation: Students are expected to demonstrate appropriate punctuation in writing. a. Parentheses b. Quotation marks c. Terminal punctuation d. Punctuation in common abbreviations and after an initial e. Apostrophes in contractions and possessives f. Commas g. Colons, and semi-colons h. Hyphens and dashes 4. Sentence Structure: The student will demonstrate appropriate sentence structure in writing. a. Use simple, compound, and complex sentences appropriately in writing. b. Create interesting declarative, imperative, interrogative, and exclamatory sentences using words that describe, explain, or provide additional details and connections, such as adjectives, adverbs, appositives, participial phrases, direct objects, prepositional phrases, and conjunctions. c. Correct sentence fragments and run-ons. d. Create sentences with understood subject. 5. Spelling: Students are expected to demonstrate appropriate application of spelling knowledge to the revising and editing stages of writing. a. Spell correctly roots, inflections (e.g., -s/es, -ing, -ly, -er), suffixes (e.g., -ment, -ness, -able, -sion, tion), and prefixes (e.g., dis-, in-, un-, re-, mis-, pre-). b. Spell homophones correctly according to usage (e.g., to, too, two; there, their, they're). c. Use more complex patterns in producing conventional spellings (e.g., ought = brought, fought; urse = nurse, purse). d. Use word reference materials including glossary, dictionary, and technology to check correct spelling. 6. Handwriting: Students are expected to demonstrate appropriate, legible cursive handwriting in the writing process. 60

C3 (PASS) Writing/Grammar/Usage and Mechanics – 5th GRADE Writing/Grammar/Usage and Mechanics. The student will express ideas effectively in written modes for a variety of purposes and audiences. Standard 1: Writing Process. The student will use the writing process to write coherently. 1. Use the writing process to develop, extend, and refine composition skills by using a variety of prewriting strategies, such as brainstorming, clustering, illustrating, webbing, using graphic organizers, notes, and logs. 2. Understand and demonstrate familiarity with the writing process and format (beginning, middle, and ending) and structure of main idea, exposition, body, and conclusion). 3. Use common organizational structures for providing information in writing, such as chronological/sequential order, cause and effect, or similarity and difference, and posing and answering questions. 4. Select a focus and an organizational structure based upon purpose/mode, audience, and required format. a. Write one or more drafts by categorizing ideas and organizing them into paragraphs. b. Blend paragraphs with effective transitions into longer compositions. 5. Edit/proofread drafts, using standard editing marks, to ensure standard usage, mechanics, spelling, and varied sentence structure to improve meaning and clarity. 6. Review, evaluate, and revise selected drafts by adding, elaborating, deleting, combining, and rearranging text for meaning and clarity. 7. Publish and present writing to peers and adults. Standard 2: Modes and Forms of Writing. Communicate through a variety of written forms, for various purposes, and to a specific audience or person. 1. Communicate through a variety of written forms and for various audiences to inform, persuade, entertain, describe and reflect, while adjusting tone and style as appropriate. 2. Write narratives that establish a plot, point of view, setting, conflict, and are written to allow a reader to picture the events of a story. Example: Select a type of narrative to write that is modeled after a genre of literature that has been shared in the classroom such as folktale, myth, science fiction, or mystery. Be sure to include an interesting beginning, develop the central conflict of the story, and establish an ending that resolves the conflict. 3. With creative narratives and poems, use varied word choice, dialogue, and figurative language when appropriate (alliteration, personification, simile, and metaphor) to make writing engaging to the audience (e.g., inquired or requested instead of asked). 4. Write personal, persuasive, formal letters, thank-you notes, and invitations, including the date, greeting, body, closing, and signature. 5. Write expository (informational) pieces with multiple paragraphs that: a. provide an introductory paragraph. b. establish and support a central theme or idea with a thesis statement. c. include supporting paragraphs with simple facts, details, and explanations. d. present important ideas and events in sequence or in chronological order. e. provide details and transitions to link paragraphs. f. conclude with a paragraph that summarizes the points. g. use correct indention at the beginning of paragraphs. h. use at least three sources of valid and reliable information including books, newspapers, periodicals, online, and media sources.

61

6. Write research reports about important ideas, issues, or events that: a. frame questions about an idea or issue to direct the investigation. b. a main idea or topic. c. develop the topic with simple facts, details, examples, and explanations to support the main idea. d. use at least three different types information sources, including speakers, firsthand interviews, reference materials, and online information. 7. Write responses to literature that: a. demonstrate an understanding of a designated literary work. b. support judgments by referring and connecting to prior knowledge. c. develop interpretations and evaluations that exhibit careful reading and understanding. 8. Write persuasive compositions or letters that: a. state a clear position in support of a proposal. b. support a position with relevant evidence and effective emotional appeals in order to persuade. c. organize supporting statements from the most appealing to the least powerful d. include and address reader/audience concerns. Example: Interview several students in varying grades about the changes they would like to see in the monthly cafeteria menu choices. Compile the opinions and ideas to compose a persuasive article for the school newspaper. Standard 3: Grammar/Usage and Mechanics. The student will demonstrate appropriate practices in writing by applying Standard English conventions to the revising and editing stages of writing. 1. Grammar/Usage: Students are expected to recognize and use nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, and conjunctions in their writing. a. Singular and plural forms of nouns and pronouns b. Nominative (subjective), objective, reflexive, and possessive pronouns c. Relative, intensive, and intensive pronouns d. Subject, indirect, direct object, and object of prepositions e. Transitive and intransitive verbs f. Present, past, future, and present perfect verbs tense g. Positive, comparative, and superlative adjectives h. Time, place, manner, and degree adverbs i. Comparative forms of adverbs j. Subject-verb agreement k. Restrictive (essential) and nonrestrictive (nonessential) clauses and phrases l. Subordinate adverb, adjective, and noun clauses m. Pronoun antecedents and reference n. Coordinating, correlating, and subordinating conjunctions 2. Mechanics: Students are expected to demonstrate appropriate language mechanics in writing. a. Capitalize correctly proper nouns such as titles of books, magazines, newspapers, stories, titles of respect, works of art, regions of the country, political parties, organizations, state colleges universities, languages, races, nationalities, and religions. b. Capitalize correctly proper adjectives. c. Capitalize correctly conventions of letter writing. d. Indent beginning lines of paragraphs.

62

3. Punctuation: Students are expected to demonstrate appropriate punctuation in writing. a. Parentheses b. Quotation marks c. Terminal punctuation (period, exclamation point, or question mark) d. Punctuation after initials e. Apostrophes in contractions and possessives f. Conventions of letter writing g. Colons, semi-colons, and commas h. Hyphens and dashes 4. Sentence Structure: The student will demonstrate appropriate sentence structure in writing declarative, imperative, exclamatory, and interrogative sentences. a. Create interesting simple, complete, compound, and complex sentences that describe, explain, or provide additional details and connections, such as adjectives, adverbs, appositives, participial phrases, prepositional phrases, simple, complete, and compound predicates, modifiers, pronouns, and conjunctions. b. Create sentences with an understood subject. c. Correct sentence fragments and run-ons. 5. Spelling: Students are expected to demonstrate appropriate application of spelling knowledge to the revising and editing stages of writing. a. Spell previously misspelled words correctly in final writing products. b. Spell correctly roots, inflections (e.g., -s/es, -ing, -ly, -en -er), suffixes (e.g., -ment, -ture, -ate, able, -sion, -tion), and prefixes (e.g., dis-, in-, un-, re-, mis-, pre-), and syllable constructions (e.g., grad.u.a.tion). c. Spell homophones correctly according to usage (e.g., to, too, two; there, their, they're) and other words that are commonly misspelled in the English language (e.g., until, our) d. Use word reference materials including glossary, dictionary, thesaurus, encyclopedia, and technology to check and correct spelling. 6. Handwriting: Students are expected to demonstrate appropriate, legible handwriting in the writing process.

63

rd

3 GRADE

PACING GUIDE

64

~NOTES~

65

LAWTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS Building Academic Vocabulary 2012-2013

Audibles – 3rd Grade The following is the Building Academic Vocabulary list from the Oklahoma State Department of Education. 

Math algorithm analog clock area array bar graph





Science amphibians balance conservation contract dispersal endangered environment

Language Arts abbreviation adverb biography chapter headings check for understanding



Social Studies agriculture borders capital resources climate conflict consumer culture

migrate mixture physical change pollination

chronological order conjunction contemporary realistic fiction context clues declarative encyclopedia exclamatory fact glossary historical fiction imperative index inferences interrogative

renewable/nonrenewable resources

main idea

natural resources

meter centimeter

reptiles rock

modern fantasy multi-meaning words

physical map political map

gram

solution

homonyms/homophones

population

commutative property

coordinates customary/standard measurement data denominator density digital clock division edge face factor grid horizontal input metric units

kilogram multiple multiplication number sentence numerator ordered pairs output perimeter pictograph probability product rounding three-dimensional vertex vertical

extinct food chain germinate invertebrate investigate mammals metamorphosis complete & incomplete

sound structures traits vertebrate vibrations

opinion persuasion possessive revise run-on sentences story elements subject supporting details theme CCSS Words and,but,more,also another because for example since therefore

66

distribution economy Equator geographic features geography global hemisphere human resources industry&manufacturing

latitude/parallels longitude/meridians map key/legend

Prime Meridian producer product representative leaders resources scale scarcity suburban thematic unit wants and needs

3rd Grade Question Prompts for Reading Which sentence would best help a student make this prediction?

What lesson does ______ learn in the passage/paragraph/story?

Which question is answered in this passage?

Which is the best summary for this passage/poem?

Which best explains why _____ happens?

Which best summarizes this?

________ would most likely be?

This story is mainly about?

How does _____ feel when ______ happens in paragraph/sentence ______?

Paragraph ___ tells the reader _____?

This story mostly tells the reader ______.

What is the best way to summarize the story? _________ is mainly about?

Which sentence/paragraph shows_____?

What is the main idea of the paragraph/story?

The word _____ in paragraph _____ has a root word which means?

Based on the passage/paragraph which best describes _______?

In paragraph _____ antonym/synonym/homonym for ______ is?

How does the speaker/author feel about________? Which is a fact/opinion from the paragraph/passage/sentence?

Which word means the same as ______ in paragraph/line ______?

What will ____ most likely do? In paragraph _____ the prefix in _____ word means. _______ and ______ are both about what? To find out how to say the word/ meaning of a word a student should look in _________.

What is the common theme in both passages?

Which meaning best fits the way ______ is used in paragraph _____?

Which idea would the author of both passages most likely agree?

What is the main purpose of this?

Which list of words are in alphabetical order?

Based on the title, what could a student predict this passage is about?

Between which two topics would a student find ____ in an encyclopedia?

What do you think the passage will probably be about?

Between which two guide words in a dictionary?

The main reason to read this passage/poem is to____.

The____ must include all of these except.

What is the main theme of the poem?

Line __ & __ have the same sound at the end. What is it called?

How are ______ & _______ alike? In line ___ are examples of alliteration/figurative language?

Why would a student use a book’s glossary?

Which lines from the poem rhyme?

To find out what chapter/pages have information on ______ a students would use?

Which sentence is most important to _________? Large printed words/dotted lines/bold print are used for_______? 67

Oklahoma School Testing Program Oklahoma Core Curriculum Tests Grade 3rd Reading

Test Blueprint School Year 2011-2012 1. The Test Blueprint reflects the degree to which each PASS standard and objective is represented on the test. The overall distribution of operational items in a test form is intended to look as follows:

12

Words in Context (2.1)

2-4

Affixes, Roots, and Stems (2.2)

2-4

Synonyms, Antonyms, and Homonyms (2.3)

2-4

Using Resource Materials (2.4)

2-4

Comprehension/Critical Literacy

24

Literal Understanding (4.1)

5

Inferences and Interpretation (4.2)

7

Summary and Generalization (4.3)

6

Analysis and Evaluation (4.4)

6

Literature

8

Literary Elements (5.2)

4

Figurative Language/Sound Devices (5.3)

4

Research and Information

6

Accessing Information (6.1)

6

Total Test

50

*

Level 3- Strategic Thinking

Vocabulary

Level 2- Skills and Concepts

PASS Standards and Objectives

Ideal Number of Items for Alignment to PASS*

Level 1- Recall and Reproduction

Ideal Number of Test Items by DoK ***

24%

3

8

1

48%

6

16

2

16%

2

5

1

12%

2

3

1

100%

13

32

5

Ideal Percentage of Items**

A minimum of 4 items is required to report results for an objective, and a minimum of 6 items is required to report a standard. While the actual numbers of items on the test may not match the blueprint exactly, each future test will move toward closer alignment with the ideal blueprint. ** Percents are approximations and may result in a sum other than 100 due to rounding. *** Depth of Knowledge- Level 1= 20-25%, Level 2= 65-70%, Level 3= 5-15%. The number of DoK items are approximate.

68

LAWTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS Reading Pacing Guide Grade 3

1st Quarter The number in the column indicates how many questions will be on the LPS Benchmark Assessment. In Q4, the T indicates that the item will be on the Oklahoma Core Curriculum Test (OCCT), according to the OCCT Blueprint provided by the Oklahoma State Department of Education (SDE). Standards in italics are not tested but should be taught. Reading/Literature: The student will apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, appreciate, and respond to a wide variety of texts. Objectives *Standard 1: Phonics/Decoding - The student will apply sound-symbol relationships to decode words.

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

4

4

4

T

5

3

5

T

4

5

4

T

1

1

1

T

1. Phonetic Analysis - Apply knowledge of phonetic analysis to decode unknown words (e.g., common letter/sound relationships, consonants, blends, digraphs, vowels, and diphthongs). 2. Structural Analysis - Apply knowledge of structural analysis to decode unknown words (e.g., syllabication rules, affixes, root words, compound words, spelling patterns, contractions, final stable syllables). 3. Apply knowledge of sentence structures and semantics in conjunction with phonics and structural analysis to decode unknown words. Standard 2: Vocabulary - The student will develop and expand knowledge of words and word meanings to increase vocabulary. 1. Words in Context - Use context clues (the meaning of the text around the word) to determine the meaning of grade-level appropriate words. 2. Affixes - Use prefixes (for example: un-, pre-, bi-, mis-, dis-, en-, in-, im-, ir-), suffixes (for example: -er, -est, -ful, -ness, -ing, -ish, -less), and roots to determine the meaning of words. 3. Synonyms, Antonyms, and Homonyms/Homophones - Determine the meanings of words using knowledge of synonyms, antonyms, homonyms/homophones, and multiple meaning words. 4. Using Resource Materials - Use word reference materials (glossary, dictionary, thesaurus) to determine the meaning and pronunciation of unknown words.

69

Objectives *Standard 3: Fluency - The student will identify words rapidly so that attention is directed at the meaning of the text.

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

a. Read and comprehend poetry, fiction, and nonfiction that is appropriately designed for third grade.

2

2

1

T

b. Use prereading strategies independently to preview, activate prior knowledge, predict content of text, and establish a purpose for reading.

1

2

2

T

c. Recall major points in a text and revise predictions about what is read.

3

1

1

T

d. Show understanding by asking questions and supporting answers with literal information from the text.

1

2

3

T

1. Read regularly in independent-level texts (texts in which no more than 1 in 20 words is difficult for the reader) fluently and accurately, and with appropriate rate, change in voice, and expression. 2. Read regularly in instructional-level texts that are challenging yet manageable (texts in which no more than 1 in 10 words is difficult for the reader). 3. Engage in repeated readings of the same text to increase fluency. 4. Accurately and fluently read 300-400 high frequency and/or irregularly spelled words in meaningful texts. 5. Use punctuation cues (e.g., final punctuation, commas, quotation marks) in text with appropriate phrasing as a guide to understanding meaning. Standard 4: Comprehension/Critical Literacy - The student will interact with the words and concepts in a text to construct an appropriate meaning. 1. Literal Understanding

2. Inferences and Interpretation a. Make inferences by connecting prior knowledge and experience with information from the text.

2

2

b. Interpret text, including lessons or morals depicted in fairytales, fables, etc., and draw conclusions from evidence presented in the text.

3

2

T

2

T

*c. Participate in creative response to text (e.g., art, drama, and oral presentations). 4. Analysis and Evaluation b. Distinguish between fact and opinion in nonfiction text.

70

2

1

1

T

Objectives *5. Monitoring and Correction Strategies

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

a. Alphabetize to the third letter.

2

1

1

T

b. Use guide words to locate words in dictionaries and topics in encyclopedias.

1

1

c. Access information from charts, maps, graph, schedules, directions, and diagrams.

1

a. Monitor own reading and modify strategies as needed (e.g., recognize when he or she is confused by a section of text, questions whether the text makes sense) b. Predict, monitor, and check for understanding using semantic, syntactic, and graphophonic cues. c. Clarify meaning by rereading, questioning, and modifying predictions. Standard 5: Literature - The student will read to construct meaning and respond to a wide variety of literary forms. *1. Literary Genres - Demonstrate knowledge of and appreciation for various forms (genres) of literature. a. Recognize characteristics of literary genres and forms (e.g., contemporary realistic fiction, historical fiction, nonfiction, modern fantasy, poetry, drama, and traditional stories such as fairy tales and fables). b. Read, understand, and discuss a variety of genres. Standard 6: Research and Information - The student will conduct research and organize information. 1. Accessing Information - The student will select the best source for a given purpose.

71

T 1

T

3rd Grade Writing Pacing Guide – 1st Quarter Mode Writing examples are connected to reading objectives.

Month August

Narrative - Personal Informational/Explanatory - Functional Writing such as directions Informational/Explanatory – Research Benchmark – Passage based

September October

Writing should be incorporated across the curriculum. The following are IDEAS. You can choose to use the prompts or use them as a springboard for you own ideas. Since the benchmarks and writing test will be PASSAGE-BASED, it is suggested that a piece of reading of your choice be tied to these prompts. NARRATIVES Write a narrative of how the parcels of land were measured and divided for the land run. (math) Write a narrative about an experiment using the scientific method. (science) Write a descriptive narrative as a person in Oklahoma history. (social studies)

INFORMATIONAL/EXPLANATORY Using sequence, transitional, or ordinal words write a step-by-step explanation of a word problem. (math) Use a graphic organizer for research notetaking over an animal native to Oklahoma. (science/social studies) Questions

Answer

Details

Reference

What is the habitat of the bison?

Tall grass prairie

The bison is an herbivore, a nomad, follows the climate

Bison of America

Why are bison on the refuge in SW Oklahoma?

Write a paragraph explaining the cause/effect relationship between the pioneer settlements and the relocation of the Native Americans in Oklahoma. (social studies) Create an acrostic poem using facts found in text over a significant historical event in Oklahoma such as the land run. (social studies) Write the step-by-step directions to a favorite Oklahoma recipe. (math/social studies) 72

My Writing Ideas…

73

LAWTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS Reading Pacing Guide Grade 3

2nd Quarter All objectives from Quarter 1 should be maintained during this quarter because questions from those objectives will be on the LPS Benchmark Assessment and the OCCT. Standards in italics are not tested but should be taught. Reading/Literature: The student will apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, appreciate, and respond to a wide variety of texts. Objectives Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Standard 4: Comprehension/Critical Literacy - The student will interact with the words and concepts in a text to construct an appropriate meaning. 2. Inferences and Interpretation a. Make inferences by connecting prior knowledge and experience with information from the text

2

2

T

3. Summary and Generalization a. Summarize by recognizing main ideas, key concepts, key actions, and supporting details in fiction and nonfiction.

3

3

3

T

b. Make generalizations about a text (e.g., theme of a story or main idea of an informational text).

3

2

3

T

c. Produce summaries of fiction and nonfiction text, highlighting major points

3

3

3

T

a. Compare and contrast plots, settings, or characters presented by different authors and the same author of multiple texts.

2

3

3

T

b. Recognize themes that occur across literary works. Example: Read Yoko by Rosemary Wells and You Are Special by Max Lucado. Discuss the theme of "everyone is unique" that occurs in both stories.

2

1

1

T

3. Figurative Language and Sound Devices - The student will identify figurative language and sound devices in writing and how they affect the development of a literary work. Example: Identify and discuss how certain words and rhythmic patterns can be used in a selection to imitate sounds (e.g., rhythm, rhyme, alliteration).

4

4

4

T

Standard 5: Literature - The student will read to construct meaning and respond to a wide variety of literary forms. 2. Literary Elements - Demonstrate knowledge of literary elements and techniques and how they affect the development of a literary work.

74

Objectives Standard 6: Research and Information - The student will conduct research and organize information. 1. Accessing Information - The student will select the best source for a given purpose. d. Use the title page, table of contents, glossary, chapter headings, and index to locate information.

Q1

Q2

Q3

4

1

Q4

T

*2. Interpreting Information - The student will analyze and evaluate information from a variety of sources. a. Begin the research process by selecting a topic, formulating questions, and identifying key words. b. Locate, organize, and synthesize information from a variety of print and nonprint and technological resources (e.g., dictionaries, reference books, atlases, magazines, informational texts, thesaurus, and technology/Internet). c. Compile information into summaries of information. d. Use test-taking strategies by answering different levels of questions, such as openended, literal, and interpretive, as well as multiple choice, true/false, and short answer.

Field Goals When maintaining the previous quarter, pay special attention to these objectives. Most have several questions on the 2nd benchmark. In order to score those extra points, students need more practice. 2.1-4 – Vocabulary 3.1-5 – Fluency 4.1a-d – Comprehension – Literal Understanding

75

3rd Grade Writing Pacing Guide – 2nd Quarter Month

Mode Writing examples are connected to reading objectives.

October

Informational/Explanatory – Research (finish from 1st Quarter)

November

Argumentative/Opinion Pieces

December

Argumentative/Opinion Pieces

Writing should be incorporated across the curriculum. The following are IDEAS. You can choose to use the prompts or use them as a springboard for you own ideas. Since the benchmarks and writing test will be PASSAGE-BASED, it is suggested that a piece of reading of your choice be tied to these prompts.

ARGUMENTATIVE/OPINION Compare and contrast traditional two digit multiplication to lattice multiplication. Defend your opinion on which mathematical technique is easier. (math) After studying the geographical regions of Oklahoma, write an opinion piece of where you prefer to live. (science) Write an opinion piece expressing your point of view on the importance of establishing wildlife refuges in Oklahoma. Support your point of view with evidence from your research. (science) Write a letter that states your opinion about the choices of Oklahoma’s state symbols. (social studies) Write a letter to the Great Plains Museum expressing your opinion about an exhibit seen on your field trip. Support your opinion with facts learned and information from text on the same topic. (social studies)

76

My Writing Ideas…

77

LAWTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS Reading Pacing Guide Grade 3

3rd Quarter All objectives from Quarter 1 & 2 should be maintained during this quarter because questions from those objectives will be on the LPS Benchmark Assessment and the OCCT. Standards in italics are not tested but should be taught. Reading/Literature: The student will apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, appreciate, and respond to a wide variety of texts.

Objectives Standard 4: Comprehension/Critical Literacy - The student will interact with the words and concepts in a text to construct an appropriate meaning.

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

3

2

2

T

2. Inferences and Interpretation b. Interpret text, including lessons or morals depicted in fairytales, fables, etc., and draw conclusions from evidence presented in the text. 4. Analysis and Evaluation a. Analyze characters including their traits, relationships, feelings, and changes in text.

1

2

T

1

2

1

T

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

2

T

c. Analyze the causes, motivations, sequences, and results of events from a text. Objectives Standard 6: Research and Information - The student will conduct research and organize information. 1. Accessing Information - The student will select the best source for a given purpose. e. Use text formats as an aid in constructing meaning from nonfiction (expository) text (e.g., heading, subheading, bold print, and italics).

Field Goals When maintaining the previous quarter, pay special attention to these objectives. Most have several questions on the 3rd benchmark. In order to score those extra points, students need more practice. 2.1-4 – Vocabulary 4.3a-c Summary & Generalizations 3.1-5 – Fluency 5.3 – Figurative Language 4.1a-d – Comprehension – Literal Understanding 78

3rd Grade Writing Pacing Guide – 3rd Quarter Month January

Mode Writing examples are connected to reading objectives. Informational/Explanatory - Literary Analysis Benchmark – Passage based

February

Narrative - Descriptive

March

Informational/Explanatory

Writing should be incorporated across the curriculum. The following are IDEAS. You can choose to use the prompts or use them as a springboard for you for your own ideas. Since the benchmarks and writing test will be PASSAGE-BASED, it is suggested that a piece of reading of your choice be tied to these prompts. INFORMATIONAL/EXPLANATORY Literary Analysis: Read and analyze the figurative language used in the song “Oklahoma” or “This Land is Your Land”. Explain the use of onomatopoeia, similes, and alliteration with the songs. (social studies) Compare and contrast the descriptions within both songs and then add “Oklahoma Risin’”. Which song seems the most descriptive? Give detailed examples. (social studies) Explain the use of the alliteration “Trail of Tears” to describe the events of the relocation of the Native Americans. (social studies) Describe the early expeditions in Oklahoma. Choose from: Coronado or George Catlin (social studies) Write a biography of a famous Oklahoman. (social studies)

79

NARRATIVE Using evidence from research, describe your day as a farmer during the Dust Bowl in Oklahoma. (social studies) Keep a journal for one week of your life as a Native American. Choose from the Spiro Mound Builders, The Five Tribes, or the Plains Native American. Provide factual information in your journal entries. (social studies)

My Writing Ideas…

80

LAWTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS Reading Pacing Guide Grade 3

4th Quarter Reading and writing with informational text in the content areas will be the focus. Continued instruction will build vocabulary (academic & domain) as a bridge to the 4th grade. These skills will create a Forward PASS to 4th grade. Reading/Literature: The student will apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, appreciate, and respond to a wide variety of texts. Objectives Standard 4: Comprehension/Critical Literacy - The student will interact with the words and concepts in a text to construct an appropriate meaning. 2. Inferences and Interpretation

Q1

Q2

a. Make inferences by connecting prior knowledge and experience with information from the text

2

2

b. Interpret text, including lessons or morals depicted in fairytales, fables, etc., and draw conclusions from evidence presented in the text.

3

3

Q3

Q4

T

2

T

3. Summary and Generalization a. Summarize by recognizing main ideas, key concepts, key actions, and supporting details in fiction and nonfiction.

3

3

3

T

b. Make generalizations about a text (e.g., theme of a story or main idea of an informational text).

3

2

3

T

c. Produce summaries of fiction and nonfiction text, highlighting major points

3

3

3

T

4. Analysis and Evaluation b. Distinguish between fact and opinion in nonfiction text. Standard 5: Literature - The student will read to construct meaning and respond to a wide variety of literary forms. 2. Literary Elements - Demonstrate knowledge of literary elements and techniques and how they affect the development of a literary work. a. Compare and contrast plots, settings, or characters presented by different authors and the same author of multiple texts.

2

1

2

1

3

T

3

T

See the Forward PASS page for additional objectives to be taught during the 4th quarter after completion of the OCCTs. 81

3rd Grade Writing Pacing Guide – 4th Quarter Month

Mode Writing examples are connected to reading objectives.

March

Informational/Explanatory

April

Informational/Explanatory - Literary Analysis of Poetry

May

Narrative

Writing should be incorporated across the curriculum. The following are IDEAS. You can choose to use the prompts or use them as a springboard for you own ideas. Since the benchmarks and writing test will be PASSAGE-BASED, it is suggested that a piece of reading of your choice be tied to these prompts. LITERARY ANALYSIS - POETRY Choose a poem about an animal, plant, or insect. Analyze the amount of factual scientific information versus opinionated descriptions. Write the info in a TChart. (science) Compare two poems and examine the theme, setting, and actions. Explain how they are alike and different. (ELA) Examine a piece of artwork by George Catlin and write a description of the piece. Use descriptive language to paint a picture in words of the painting. (social studies)

NARRATIVE Pretend you are a bug or a frog. Write a descriptive narrative of the life cycle of either animal. (science) Write a personal narrative about your idea of the best summer day. (ELA)

82

My Writing Ideas…

83

Forward PASS 3rd grade

4th grade

2.1 - Words in Context 2.2 - Affixes 2.3 - Synonyms, Antonyms, and Homonyms/Homophones 6.1.- Accessing Information - The student will select the best source for a given purpose. a. Alphabetize to the third letter.

1.1 - Words in Context 1.2 - Affixes, Roots, and Derivatives 1.3 - Synonyms, Antonyms, and Homonyms/Homophones 5.1 - Accessing Information - Select the best source for a given purpose. a. Understand the organization of and access information from a variety of sources b. Identify key words to be used in searching for resources and information. c. Cite information sources appropriately.

b. Use guide words to locate words in dictionaries and topics in encyclopedias. c. Access information from charts, maps, graph, schedules, directions, and diagrams. d. Use the title page, table of contents, glossary, chapter headings, and index to locate information. e. Use text formats as an aid in constructing meaning from nonfiction (expository) text (e.g., heading, subheading, bold print, and italics).

d. Use text formats and organization as an aid in constructing meaning from nonfiction (expository) e. Locate information in reference texts by using organizational features, such as prefaces and appendixes. f. Continue to use test-taking strategies by answering different levels of questions, such as open-ended, literal, and interpretive, as well as multiple choice, true/false, and short answer,

Application of these skills can be obtained through informational writing in the content areas. Modes of writing are to include informational, narrative, and argument. Fluency Objectives In order to promote proficient comprehension of text, a strong continued focus on the fluent reading of grade level text is appropriate. Fluency practice of grade level text should occur daily through the fourth quarter to promote maintenance of comprehension. Vocabulary Objectives Words in context, Affixes, Roots, and Derivatives, Synonyms, Antonyms, Homonyms/Homophones are skills that need continued application as students progress toward the next grade. These vocabulary skills need repeated and extended lessons to promote grade level performance. 84

~NOTES~

85

th

4 GRADE PACING GUIDE

86

~NOTES~

87

LAWTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS Building Academic Vocabulary 2012-2013

Audibles – 4th Grade The following is the Building Academic Vocabulary list from the Oklahoma State Department of Education. 

Math acute angle associative axis computation dividend divisor elapsed time equivalent expanded form expression frequency table hundredths inequality symbols intersecting inverse operation line graph obtuse angle parallel perpendicular prediction quotient reasonable reflection right angle rotation rule standard form lengths translation variable





Science adaptation balance scale classification conductor consumer decomposer deposition direction electrical circuit (open and closed) electricity erosion evidence force (pull/push) fossils friction inherited traits insulator mineral motion organism position producer reproduce resistance sediment SI Prefixes micro milli centi kilo SI Units grams meters liters degrees Celsius speed stationary objects survival weathering

Language Arts almanac analyze appendix audience author’s purpose character’s motive compare/contrast double negatives

Social Studies almanacs bay canyon city council delta economic specialization

entrepreneur exports

drawing conclusions

global trade

evaluate genre hyperbole legend metaphor myths outline paraphrase persuasive possessive nouns prewrite preface proofread publish research sentence fragment simile simple predicate simple subject

governor human system immigrants

CCSS Words also another because for example for instance in addition in order to

88



intermediate directions

land run mayor mesa major metropolitan center point of view/perspective

prairie primary sources region relative location rural secondary sources state capitol state legislature Trail of Tears tributary urban

4th Grade Reading Question Prompts What is the article mainly about?

Which best describes how ______ felt when ________?

Which sentence best states the main idea/event?

How does_______ character’s feelings change throughout the text/passage?

Which answer best explains? The ___ paragraph is mostly a description of ____?

In paragraph ____ the word buttery contains the suffix “y”.

Which is the best summary?

Which has the same meaning as the y in ______?

Which is most likely to happen?

In paragraph ___ what does the suffix/prefix ____ in _____ mean.

Complete the graphic organizer to show …. In the poem/line/stanza what does _______ mean? What is the author’s purpose in this passage? Which word best describes ________? Which statement would the author probably agree with? Which event best completes the timeline? What does the author suggest to the reader? How did the author use _____ in paragraph ______?

How does the narrator/author feel at the end of the poem/passage?

Which meaning of _______ is used in paragraph _____?

What conclusion can be made about_______?

Look in paragraph/line _____. What is a synonym/antonym/homonym/etc… for_______?

Which is another good title for this? Which is least important to include?

After reading the paragraph/title what question/statement would the reader most likely ask/predict?

Who would most likely want to read __________?

Which details support the fact that this passage is fiction/nonfiction?

In paragraph _____ two root words _____ & _____ joined together mean?

Which statement is probably true about _______?

Which is mentioned in both the passage and poem/flyer/article/ etc?

The reader can tell that _______? Which theme is found in both _____ and _____?

89

Oklahoma School Testing Program Oklahoma Core Curriculum Tests Grade 4 Reading

Test Blueprint School Year 2011-2012 2. The Test Blueprint reflects the degree to which each PASS standard and objective is represented on the test. The overall distribution of operational items in a test form is intended to look as follows:

12

Words in Context (1.1)

4

Affixes, Roots, and Stems (1.2)

4

Synonyms, Antonyms, and Homonyms (1.3)

4

Comprehension/Critical Literacy

23

Literal Understanding (3.1)

4

Inferences and Interpretation (3.2)

6

Summary and Generalization (3.3)

7

Analysis and Evaluation (3.4)

6

Literature

9

Literary Elements (4.2)

5

Figurative Language/Sound Devices (4.3)

4

Research and Information

6

Accessing Information (5.1)

6

Total Test

50

Level 3- Strategic Thinking

Vocabulary

Level 2- Skills and Concepts

PASS Standards and Objectives

Ideal Number of Items for Alignment to PASS*

Level 1- Recall and Reproduction

Ideal Number of Test Items by DoK ***

24%

3

8

1

46%

6

15

2

18%

2

1

6

12%

2

3

1

100%

13

27

10

Ideal Percentage of Items**

* A minimum of 4 items is required to report results for an objective, and a minimum of 6 items is required to report a standard. While the actual numbers of items on the test may not match the blueprint exactly, each future test will move toward closer alignment with the ideal blueprint. ** Percents are approximations and may result in a sum other than 100 due to rounding. *** Depth of Knowledge- Level 1= 20-25%, Level 2= 65-70%, Level 3= 5-15%. The number of DoK items are approximate.

90

LAWTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS Reading Pacing Guide Grade 4

1st Quarter The number in the column indicates how many questions will be on the LPS Benchmark Assessment. In Q4, the T indicates that the item will be on the Oklahoma Core Curriculum Test (OCCT), according to the OCCT Blueprint provided by the Oklahoma State Department of Education (SDE). Standards in italics are not tested but should be taught. Reading/Literature: The student will apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, appreciate, and respond to a wide variety of texts. Objectives Standard 1: Vocabulary - The student will develop and expand knowledge of words and word meanings to increase vocabulary. 1.Words in Context – Use context clues (the meaning of the text around a word) to distinguish and interpret the meaning of multiple meaning words as well as other unfamiliar words. 2. Affixes, Roots, and Derivatives a. Interpret new words by analyzing the meaning of prefixes and suffixes. b. Use knowledge of root words (e.g., snow, snowbound, snowdrift) and word parts (therm = heat) derived from Greek and Latin to analyze the meaning of complex words (thermometer). 3. Synonyms, Antonyms, and Homonyms/Homophones - Apply knowledge of fourth grade level synonyms, antonyms, homonyms/homophones, multiple meaning words, and idioms to determine the meanings of words and phrases. *4. Using Resource Materials a. Use a thesaurus to determine related words and concepts. b. Determine the meanings and pronunciations of unknown words by using a glossary and/or dictionary. Standard 3: Comprehension/Critical Literacy - The student will interact with the words and concepts in a text to construct an appropriate meaning. 1. Literal Understanding a. Use prereading strategies independently to preview, activate prior knowledge, predict content of text, formulate questions that might be answered in the text, establish and adjust purposes for reading (e.g., to find out, to understand, to enjoy, to solve problems). b. Read and comprehend poetry, fiction, and nonfiction that is appropriately designed for fourth grade. 2. Inferences and Interpretation a. Use prior knowledge and experience to make inferences and support them with information presented in text. b. Make interpretations and draw conclusions from fiction and nonfiction text beyond personal experience. 91

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

4

4

4

T

2

2

2

T

2

2

1

T

5

5

4

T

1

2

2

T

2

3

3

1

1

T

3

3

1

T

T

Objectives 3. Summary and Generalization d. Represent text information in different ways such as in outline, timeline, or graphic organizer. *5. Monitoring and Correction Strategies a. Monitor own reading and modify strategies as needed (e.g., recognizes when he or she is confused by a section of text, questions whether the text makes sense, rereading). c. Predict, monitor, and check for understanding using semantic, syntactic, and graphophonic cues. Standard 4: Literature - The student will read to construct meaning and respond to a wide variety of literary forms. 3. Figurative Language and Sound Devices - The student will identify figurative language and sound devices in writing and how they affect the development of a literary work. a. Interpret poetry and recognize poetic styles (e.g., rhymed, free verse, and patterned [cinquain, diamante]). b. Define figurative language, such as similes, metaphors, hyperboles, or personification, and identify its use in literary works. Standard 5: Research and Information - The student will conduct research and organize information. 1. Accessing Information - Select the best source for a given purpose. b. Understand the organization of and access information from a variety of sources including dictionaries, encyclopedias, atlases, almanacs, tables of contents, glossaries, and indexes. b. Identify key words to be used in searching for resources and information. c. Cite information sources appropriately. c. Use text formats and organization as an aid in constructing meaning from nonfiction (expository) text (e.g., heading, subheading, bold print, and italics). d. Locate information in reference texts by using organizational features, such as prefaces and appendixes. e. Continue to use test-taking strategies by answering different levels of questions, such as open-ended, literal, and interpretive, as well as multiple choice, true/false, and short answer. *Standard 2: Fluency - The student will identify words rapidly so that attention is directed at the meaning of the text. 1.Read aloud regularly in independent-level texts (texts in which no more than 1 in 20 words is difficult for the reader) fluently and accurately, and with appropriate rate, change in voice, and expression. 2. Read aloud regularly in instructional-level texts that are challenging yet manageable (texts in which no more than 1 in 10 words is difficult for the reader). 3. Increase reading speed through daily independent reading practice as monitored by the instructor through peer discussions, teacher conferences, response journals, etc. 92

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

3

2

3

T

3

2

3

T

2

2

2

T

1

1

3

T

1 1

2

1

T T

1

1

1

T

1

1

1

T

1

1

T

4th Grade Writing Pacing Guide – 1st Quarter Month

Mode Writing examples are connected to reading objectives.

August

Narrative - Personal

September

Informational/Explanatory - Functional Writing such as directions

October

Informational/Explanatory – Research

Writing should be incorporated across the curriculum. The following are IDEAS. You can choose to use the prompts or use them as a springboard for you own ideas. Since the benchmarks and writing test will be PASSAGE-BASED, it is suggested that a piece of reading of your choice be tied to these prompts. NARRATIVES INFORMATIONAL/EXPLANATORYDIRECTIONS

Imagine being the President of the United States for one day. Describe your experience including details for a 24-hour period. Include a timeline. (social studies/math)

Do you have a hobby? Describe what you enjoy doing in three paragraphs. Explain why your hobby is special. Use sequential transition words (first, next, then, last). (social studies)

Pretend you are an animal. Describe yourself and your habitat. (science)

Graph the most popular hobby in your class. Include a key. Use the data to draw inferences about the most popular and least popular hobby. (math) What steps do you take to collect data when observing and measuring objects, organisms, and/or events? (science)

INFORMATIONAL EXPLANATORY – RESEARCH What are the requirements for being a president? Use relevant facts and descriptive details to support your findings. (social studies) Research an animal and write a report. (science)

93

My Writing Ideas…

94

LAWTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS Reading Pacing Guide Grade 4

2nd Quarter The number in the column indicates how many questions will be on the LPS Benchmark Assessment. In Q4, the T indicates that the item will be on the Oklahoma Core Curriculum Test (OCCT), according to the OCCT Blueprint provided by the Oklahoma State Department of Education (SDE). Standards in italics are not tested but should be taught. Reading/Literature: The student will apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, appreciate, and respond to a wide variety of texts. Objectives Standard 3: Comprehension/Critical Literacy - The student will interact with the words and concepts in a text to construct an appropriate meaning. 1. Literal Understanding c. Identify and explain the differences in fiction and nonfiction text. 2. Inferences and Interpretation c. Make inferences and draw conclusions about characters’ qualities and actions (i.e., based on knowledge of plot, setting, characters’ motives, characters’ appearances, and other characters’ responses to a character). 4. Analysis and Evaluation a. Evaluate new information and hypotheses by testing them against known information and ideas.

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

1

2

1

T

2

2

4

T

1

1

0

T

1

1

T

b. Compare and contrast information on the same topic after reading several passages or articles. c.

Identify fact/opinion and cause and effect in various texts.

d. Analyze and explain the causes, motivations, sequences, and results of events from a text.

95

2

2

2

2

T 3

T

Objectives Standard 5: Research and Information - The student will conduct research and organize information. *2. Interpreting Information - Analyze and evaluate information from a variety of sources. a. Identify a research question and appropriate sources to answer that question b. Take notes to paraphrase or summarize information c. Locate, organize, and synthesize information from a variety of print, nonprint and technological resources (e.g., dictionaries, reference books, atlases, magazines, informational texts, thesaurus, and technology/Internet). d. Report on the findings of research in a variety of formats including written, oral, and/or visual presentations.

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

Field Goals When maintaining the previous quarter, pay special attention to these objectives. Most have several questions on the 2nd benchmark. In order to score those extra points, students need more practice. 1.1-1.3 – Vocabulary 2.1-2.5 – Fluency 3.1 – Literal Understanding

3.2 - Inferences & Interpretations 3.5 – Monitoring and Correction Strategies 4.3 – Figurative Language

96

4th Grade Writing Pacing Guide – 2nd Quarter Month October

Mode Writing examples are connected to reading objectives. Informational/Explanatory – Research (finish from 1st Quarter) Benchmark – Passage Based

November

Argumentative/Opinion Pieces

December

Argumentative/Opinion Pieces

Writing should be incorporated across the curriculum. The following are IDEAS. You can choose to use the prompts or use them as a springboard for you own ideas. Since the benchmarks and writing test will be PASSAGE-BASED, it is suggested that a piece of reading of your choice be tied to these prompts. ARGUMENTATIVE/OPINION Write a three paragraph essay explaining why you would be the best president of the United States. (social studies) Research the requirements for becoming a president. Explain and give specific evidence of why you would be the best president. (social studies) Tell why it is important to stop erosion. (science) Explain why it is important to conduct multiple experiments before coming to a conclusion. (science) INFORMATIONAL EXPLANATORY – RESEARCH Compare and contrast the climate of Oklahoma using different sources and cite the facts and information. (social studies) Research the Oklahoma City National Memorial and explain the historic significance of the memorial. Cite the reference sources used. (social studies)

97

My Writing Ideas…

98

LAWTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS Reading Pacing Guide Grade 4

3rd Quarter The number in the column indicates how many questions will be on the LPS Benchmark Assessment. In Q4, the T indicates that the item will be on the Oklahoma Core Curriculum Test (OCCT), according to the OCCT Blueprint provided by the Oklahoma State Department of Education (SDE). Standards in italics are not tested but should be taught. Reading/Literature: The student will apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, appreciate, and respond to a wide variety of texts. Objectives Standard 3: Comprehension/Critical Literacy - The student will interact with the words and concepts in a text to construct an appropriate meaning.

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

a. Paraphrase by recognizing main ideas, key concepts, key actions, and supporting details in fiction and nonfiction to recall, inform, or organize ideas.

2

1

4

T

b. Support ideas, arguments, and generalizations by reference to evidence in the text.

1

1

2

T

1

1

2

T

1

1

2

T

1

1

1

1

3. Summary and Generalization

Standard 4: Literature - The student will read to construct meaning and respond to a wide variety of literary forms. 2. Literary Elements - Demonstrate knowledge of literary elements and techniques and how they affect the development of a literary work. a. Identify the main events of the plot, including their causes and effects of each event on future actions, and the major theme from the story. b.

c.

Identify the purposes of different types of texts (e.g., to inform, to explain, to entertain). Identify themes that occur across literary works.

d. Use knowledge of the situation, setting, a character’s traits, motivations, and feelings to determine the causes for that character’s actions

99

T 1

T

Objectives Standard 4: Literature - The student will read to construct meaning and respond to a wide variety of literary forms.

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

*1. Literary Genres - Demonstrate knowledge of and appreciation for various forms (genres) of literature. a. Identify the defining characteristics of a variety of literary genres and forms (e.g. contemporary realistic fiction, historical fiction, nonfiction, modern fantasy, poetry, drama, legends, myths, biography, autobiographies, and traditional stories such as fairy tales and fables). b. Read and construct meaning from a variety of genres. *4. Literary Works - The student will read and respond to historically and culturally significant works of literature, compare and contrast story elements from tales of different cultures (e.g., compare/contrast adventures of character types, setting, theme).

Field Goals When maintaining the previous quarter, pay special attention to these objectives. Most have several questions on the 3rd benchmark. In order to score those extra points, students need more practice. 1.1-1.3 – Vocabulary 2.1-2.5 – Fluency 3.1 – Literal Understanding 3.2 – Inferences & Interpretations 3.5 – Monitoring and Correction Strategies 4.3 – Figurative Language 5.1 – Accessing Information

100

4th Grade Writing Pacing Guide – 3rd Quarter Month January

Mode Writing examples are connected to reading objectives. Informational/Explanatory – Literary Analysis Benchmark – Passage based

February

Narrative - Descriptive

March

Informational/Explanatory

Writing should be incorporated across the curriculum. The following are IDEAS. You can choose to use the prompts or use them as a springboard for you own ideas. Since the benchmarks and writing test will be PASSAGE-BASED, it is suggested that a piece of reading of your choice be tied to these prompts.

INFORMATIONAL/EXPLANATORY Literary Analysis: Compare and contrast the song lyrics to America and America the Beautiful. Look for uses of figurative language; alliteration, imagery, and use of specific descriptive adjectives. How are the themes similar? Different? (social studies) Research the five major Native American tribes from Oklahoma. Use cooperative groups to divide the different topics: housing, transportation, customs, contributions to American culture and history. Cite the information and bring the information together to form a whole group research report. (social studies) Write a scientific report based on students’ science fair projects. Be sure to include the scientific method. (science)

101

NARRATIVE Narrative: Imagine you are an early European that has come to America. Write a descriptive narrative explaining the experiences you have encountered with the Native Americans. (social studies) Pretend you are a scientist and explain how you conducted your scientific experiment. (science)

My Writing Ideas…

102

LAWTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS Reading Pacing Guide Grade 4

4th Quarter Reading and writing with informational text in the content areas will be the focus. Continued instruction will build vocabulary (academic & domain) as a bridge to the 5th grade. These skills will create a Forward PASS to 5th grade. Objectives Standard 3: Comprehension/Critical Literacy - The student will interact with the words and concepts in a text to construct an appropriate meaning. 1. Literal Understanding b. Read and comprehend poetry, fiction, and nonfiction that is appropriately designed for fourth grade. 3. Summary and Generalization a. Paraphrase by recognizing main ideas, key concepts, key actions, and supporting details in fiction and nonfiction to recall, inform, or organize ideas. b. Support ideas, arguments, and generalizations by reference to evidence in the text.

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

2

3

2

1

4

T

1

1

2

T

1

1

2

T

1

1

3

2

3

T

2

2

2

T

T

Standard 4: Literature - The student will read to construct meaning and respond to a wide variety of literary forms. 2. Literary Elements - Demonstrate knowledge of literary elements and techniques and how they affect the development of a literary work. b. Identify the purposes of different types of texts (e.g., to inform, to explain, to entertain). c. Identify themes that occur across literary works. 3. Figurative Language and Sound Devices - The student will identify figurative language and sound devices in writing and how they affect the development of a literary work. a. Interpret poetry and recognize poetic styles (e.g., rhymed, free verse, and patterned [cinquain, diamante]). b. Define figurative language, such as similes, metaphors, hyperboles, or personification, and identify its use in literary works.

T

See the Forward PASS page for additional objectives to be taught during the 4th quarter after completion of the OCCTs 103

4th Grade Writing Pacing Guide 4th Quarter Month

Mode Writing examples are connected to reading objectives.

March

Informational/Explanatory

April

Informational/Explanatory – Liteary Analysis of Poetry

May

Narrative

Writing should be incorporated across the curriculum. The following are IDEAS. You can choose to use the prompts or use them as a springboard for you own ideas. Since the benchmarks and writing test will be PASSAGE-BASED, it is suggested that a piece of reading of your choice be tied to these prompts.

INFORMATIONAL/EXPLANATORY Write a three paragraph essay that identifies and describes the physical features of some of the geographical landmarks of the United States. (social studies) Write a poem for two voices depicting a Native American and an African American sharing the similarities and differences of their culture. (social studies) Write an acrostic poem using the word LIBERTY, after discussing the quote from the Declaration of Independence, “We hold these truths to be selfevident that all men are created equal…” (social studies)

104

NARRATIVE Pretend your family is going on a vacation to view a national monument like the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. Create a postcard you would write to your best friend explaining some facts you have learned about the monument. Illustrate and label your postcard on the other side. (social studies)

My Writing Ideas…

105

Forward PASS 4th grade 3.1b comprehend grade level fiction and nonfiction 3.3a paraphrasing by recognizing main ideas 3.3b support ideas and arguments with evidence 5.1a use of resources 5.1b identify key words 5.1c cite information 5.1d use text formats 5.1e locate information in reference texts

5th grade 3.1b fiction and nonfiction appropriate to 5th grade 3.3a summarization of text 3.3c support ideas and arguments 5.1a determine appropriate sources 5.1b identify sources and credit sources 5.1c use of text features 5.1d use reference features 5.1e use features of informational text

Application of these skills can be obtained through informational writing in the content areas. Modes of writing are to include informational, narrative, and argument. Fluency Objectives In order to promote proficient comprehension of text, a strong continued focus on the fluent reading of grade level text is appropriate. Fluency practice of grade level text should occur daily through the fourth quarter to promote maintenance of comprehension. Vocabulary Objectives Words in context, Affixes, Roots, and Derivatives, Synonyms, Antonyms, Homonyms/Homophones are skills that need continued application as students’ progress toward the next grade. These vocabulary skills need repeated and extended lessons to promote grade level performance. 106

~NOTES~

107

TH

5

GRADE

PACING GUIDE

108

~NOTES~

109

LAWTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS Building Academic Vocabulary 2012-2013

Audibles – 5th Grade The following is the Building Academic Vocabulary list from the Oklahoma State Department of Education. 

Math balanced base composite deposit distributive property fair number cube



Science acids/bases atmosphere axis biome chemical change chemical properties



 Language Arts Social Studies caption abolitionist character development amendments comparative American Revolution Articles of Confederation adjectives/adverbs concluding paragraph basic freedoms Bill of Rights conflict

greatest common factor (GCF)

community

coordinating conjunctions

cause and effect

improper fractions

condensation

figurative language

colony

least common denominator (LCD) least common multiples (LCM)

crater

free verse

decompose

generalization

Constitutional Convention and Ratification Declaration of Independence

mean metric prefixes milli centi kilo mixed numbers percent

dichotomous keys earth’s layers crust mantel core eclipse

idiom interjections

democracy executive branch

introductory paragraph

explorers

historical map indentured servant Industrial Revolution judicial branch

plane

energy (kinetic/potential) environmental changes (human & nature)

minor character onomatopoeia parts of speech poetic styles reference source

legislative branch

prime proper fraction range ray

evaporation graduated cylinder mass matter

resolution rhythm stereotypical stress

Lewis & Clark Expedition

straight angle

moon/lunar (phases)

superlative adjectives & adverbs

mission

thousandths Venn Diagram withdraw

observe orbit pollution population precipitation revolution rotation Scientific Method serial order solar energy Solar System species transfer of energy Universe weather

text (structure) transitional words word origins

Native American/Indian

CCSS Words consequently especially in contrast specifically terminal-punctuation

110

Louisiana Purchase manifest destiny mental mapping

Preamble Puritan Quaker religion revolution rights slavery supply & demand taxes topographic map triangular trade U.S. Constitution westward expansion women’s suffrage

5th Grade Reading Question Prompts: In paragraph _____ what does this phrase mean?

How does the narrator/author feel at the end of the poem/passage?

Based on the Greek/Latin root _____ means _____ in paragraph ____?

What conclusion can be made about ________? Which statements best describes the conflict?

Why would someone most likely read ______? After reading paragraph _____ which is a reasonable prediction?

Which is the best summary for this passage/paragraph? What is another good title for _______?

What can the reader conclude about the author in paragraph/poem/passage?

Based on the title this passage will likely be about? What is the author’s purpose in this paragraph? What is paragraph/passage mainly about? Which best expresses the author’s point of view? What is the main idea for this paragraph/passage or in line ______?

From which point of view is _______ told?

Which best states the theme of the passage?

Both _____ & ______ describe mainly ______. Which idea is mentioned in both _______ & _______?

Which conclusion best reflects the theme? Which detail is least important to include?

What effect does the _____ person point of view have on the reader?

What would be a good/the best subtopic in the outline?

What words/which lines are examples of alliteration?

Which event belongs in the outline?

The line ____ is an example of which literary device/figurative language?

Which book would most likely contain the poem ______?

What important lesson does ______ learn in the story?

________ are alike or ______have in common?

Where does the story probably take place?

The passage is fiction/nonfiction because ________?

According to the passage/paragraph which of these is most likely to happen?

________ is an example of which type of literature? Look in paragraph/line _____. What is a synonym/antonym for _________?

The author organizes information by _________? Which structural/organizational pattern does the author use?

Which details support the fact that this passage is fiction/nonfiction/historical fiction/etc. ?

Which graphic best shows how this article was organized?

In the poem/stanza/line what does _______ mean?

111

Oklahoma School Testing Program Oklahoma Core Curriculum Tests Grade 5th Reading

Test Blueprint School Year 2011-2012 3. The Test Blueprint reflects the degree to which each PASS standard and objective is represented on the test. The overall distribution of operational items in a test form is intended to look as follows:

12

Words in Context (1.1)

4

Affixes, Roots, and Stems (1.2)

4

Synonyms, Antonyms, and Homonyms (1.3)

4

Comprehension/Critical Literacy

20

Literal Understanding (3.1)

Level 3- Strategic Thinking

Vocabulary

Level 2- Skills and Concepts

PASS Standards and Objectives

Ideal Number of Items for Alignment to PASS*

Level 1- Recall and Reproduction

Ideal Number of Test Items by DoK ***

24%

3

8

1

40%

5

13

2

24%

3

8

1

12%

2

3

1

100%

13

32

5

Ideal Percentage of Items**

4

Inferences and Interpretation (3.2)

4-6

Summary and Generalization (3.3)

4-6

Analysis and Evaluation (3.4)

4-6

Literature

12

Literary Genre (4.1)

4

Literary Elements (4.2)

4

Figurative Language/Sound Devices (4.3)

4

Research and Information

6

Accessing Information (5.1)

2-4

Interpreting Information (5.2)

2-4

Total Test

50

*

A minimum of 4 items is required to report results for an objective, and a minimum of 6 items is required to report a standard. While the actual numbers of items on the test may not match the blueprint exactly, each future test will move toward closer alignment with the ideal blueprint. ** Percents are approximations and may result in a sum other than 100 due to rounding. *** Depth of Knowledge- Level 1= 20-25%, Level 2= 65-70%, Level 3= 5-15%. The number of DoK items are approximate.

112

LAWTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS Reading Pacing Guide Grade 5 1st Quarter The number in the column indicates how many questions will be on the LPS Benchmark Assessment. In Q4, the T indicates that the item will be on the Oklahoma Core Curriculum Test (OCCT), according to the OCCT Blueprint provided by the Oklahoma State Department of Education (SDE). Standards in italics are not tested but should be taught. Reading/Literature: The student will apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, appreciate, and respond to a wide variety of texts.

Objectives Standard 1: Vocabulary - The student will develop and expand knowledge of words and word meanings to increase their vocabulary. 1. Words in Context a. Use knowledge of word parts and word relationships, as well as context clues (the meaning of the text around a word), to determine the meaning of specialized vocabulary and to understand the precise meaning of gradelevel-appropriate words. b. Use prior experience and context to understand and explain the figurative use of words such as similes and metaphors. 2. Affixes, Roots, and Stems a. Interpret new words by analyzing the meaning of prefixes and suffixes. b. Apply knowledge of root words to determine the meaning of unknown words within a passage. c. Use word origins, including knowledge of less common roots (graph = writing, terras=earth) and word parts (hemi = half, bio = life) from Greek and Latin to analyze the meaning of complex words (terrain, hemisphere, biography). 3. Synonyms, Antonyms, and Homonyms/Homophones - Apply knowledge of fifth grade level synonyms, antonyms, homonym/homophones, and multiple meaning words to determine the meaning of words and phrases. *4. Using Resource Materials and Aids a. Use a thesaurus to determine related words and concepts. b. Determine the meanings, pronunciation, and derivations of unknown words by using a glossary and/or dictionary. Standard 3: Comprehension/Critical Literacy - The student will interact with the words and concepts in the text to construct an appropriate meaning. 1. Literal Understanding a. Use prereading strategies independently (to preview, activate prior knowledge, predict content of text, formulate questions that might be answered by the text, and establish purpose for reading). b. Read and comprehend both fiction and nonfiction that is appropriately designed for fifth grade. 113

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

5

2

3

T

2

1

T

2

1

T

1

T

2

T

2

T

1 1

1

1

2

1

1

1

T

1

1

2

T

Objectives c. Recognize main ideas presented in a particular segment of text; identify evidence that supports those ideas. d. Use the text's structure or progression of ideas such as cause and effect or chronology to organize or recall information. 2. Inferences and Interpretation a. Apply prior knowledge and experience to make inferences and respond to new information presented in text. b. Draw inferences and conclusions about text and support them with textual evidence and prior knowledge. 3. Summary and Generalization a. Summarize and paraphrase information from entire reading selection including the main idea and significant supporting details d. Organize text information in different ways (e.g., timeline, outline, graphic organizer) to support and explain ideas. 4. Analysis and Evaluation a. Identify and analyze the characteristics of poetry, drama, fiction, and nonfiction and explain the appropriateness of the literary form chosen by an author for a specific purpose. b. Identify the main problem or conflict of the plot and explain how it is resolved. e. Recognize structural patterns found in information text (e.g., cause and effect, problem/solution, sequential order). *5. Monitoring and Correction Strategies a. Monitor own reading and modify strategies as needed when understanding breaks down (e.g., rereading a portion aloud, using reference aids, searching for clues, and asking questions). b. Predict, monitor, and check for understanding using semantic, syntactic, and graphophonic cues. c. Monitor and adjust reading rate according to the purpose for reading and the difficulty of the text. Standard 4: Literature - The student will read to contrast meaning and respond to a wide variety of literary forms. 1. Literary Genres - Demonstrate knowledge of and appreciation for various forms (genres) of literature. a. Recognize characteristics of literary genres and forms (e.g., contemporary realistic fiction, historical fiction, nonfiction, modern fantasy, poetry, drama, and traditional stories such as fairy tales, fables, myths, and legends). b. Read and construct meaning from a variety of genres.

114

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

2

1

2

T

2

3

T

2

1

T

3

2

2

T

2

3

3

T

1

2

T

1

1

T

2

1

T

2

1

2

1

T

2

T T

Objectives 3. Figurative Language and Sound Devices - Identify figurative language and sound devices in writing and how they affect the development of a literary work. a. Identify and discuss certain words and rhythmic patterns that can be used in a selection to imitate sounds (e.g., rhythm, rhyme, alliteration). b. Evaluate and identify figurative language, such as simile, metaphors, hyperbole, personification, and idioms. c. Identify the function and effect of common literary devices, such as imagery, metaphor, and symbolism. d. Interpret poetry and recognize poetic styles (e.g., rhymed, free verse, and patterned [cinquain, diamante]). Standard 5: Research and Information: The student will conduct research and organize information. 1. Accessing Information - Select the best source for a given purpose. a. Determine and use appropriate sources for accessing information including, dictionaries, thesaurus, library catalogs and databases, magazines, newspapers, technology/Internet, encyclopedias, atlases, almanacs, tables of contents, glossaries, and indexes. b. Identify and credit the sources used to gain information. c. Use text features to access information (e.g., format, italics, heading, subheadings, graphics, sequence, diagrams, illustrations, charts, and maps). 2. Interpreting Information - Analyze and evaluate information from a variety of sources. a. Follow multistep directions to accomplish a task (e.g., video games, computer programs, recipes). e. Create simple documents using a computer and employing organizational features, such as passwords, entry and pull-down menus, word searches, the thesaurus. *Standard 2: Fluency - The student will identify words rapidly so that attention is directed at the meaning of the text. 1. Read regularly in independent-level texts (texts in which no more than approximately 1 in 20 words is difficult for the reader) fluently and accurately, and with appropriate timing, change in voice, and expression. 2. Read regularly in instructional-level texts (texts in which no more than approximately 1 in 10 words is difficult for the reader). 3. Read silently for increased periods of time. 4. Increase reading through daily independent reading practice as monitored by the instructor through peer discussions, teacher conferences, response journals, etc.

115

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

1

1

1

T

2

2

3

T

2

1

1

T

1

T

2

2

1

2

T

2

1

2

T

3

1

T

1

1

T

1

T

5th Grade Writing Pacing Guide – 1st Quarter Month

Mode Writing examples are connected to reading objectives.

August

Narrative - Personal

September

Informational/Explanatory – Functional Writing

October

Informational/Explanatory – Research

Writing should be incorporated across the curriculum. The following are IDEAS. You can choose to use the prompts or use them as a springboard for you own ideas. Since the benchmarks and writing test will be PASSAGE-BASED, it is suggested that a piece of reading of your choice be tied to these prompts.

NARRATIVE Pretend you are a 21st Century explorer. Describe the “never seen before” place you are exploring, for example, deep space, Mars, the abyss of the ocean, and your adventure. (science) Write a journal entry as a Native American or early colonist depicting your day of hunting and the types of animals you encountered. (science) As Marco Polo, write a postcard to your family describing your journey on the Silk Road. (social studies)

INFORMATIONAL/EXPLANATORY Write a paragraph on how to create your favorite ice cream sundae or how to do your favorite dance. (ELA) Native Americans depended on nature for survival. Write haikus about various aspects of nature that the Native Americans revered. (social studies) Read the book, We the People and analyze the meaning of The Preamble to the Constitution. Students will summarize its true meaning in a well-written paragraph. (social studies) Write a diamante about the cause and effect relationship between two historical events or significant people, for example, Squanto and the Pilgrims. (social studies) Explain the cause and effect relationship between parts of a simple machine. Extend the writing by explaining how the simple machine works and how they help us. (science)

116

My Writing Ideas…

117

LAWTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS Reading Pacing Guide Grade 5

2nd Quarter All objectives from Quarter 1 should be maintained during this quarter because questions from those objectives will be on the LPS Benchmark Assessment and the OCCT. Standards in italics are not tested but should be taught. Reading/Literature: The student will apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, appreciate, and respond to a wide variety of texts.

Objectives Standard 3: Comprehension/Critical Literacy - The student will interact with the words and concepts in the text to construct an appropriate meaning. 2. Inferences and Interpretation c. Describe elements of character development in written works d. Make inferences or draw conclusions about characters’ qualities and actions (e.g., based on knowledge of plot, setting, characters’ motives, characters’ appearances, stereotypes and other characters’ responses to a character). *e. Participate in creative response to text. 3. Summary and Generalization b. Make generalizations with information gleaned from text. 4. Analysis and Evaluation c. Contrast the actions, motives, and appearances of characters in a work of fiction and discuss the importance of the contrasts to the plot or theme. d. Make observations and connections, react, speculate, interpret, and raise questions in analysis of texts. f. Distinguish among facts/inferences supported by evidence and opinions in text. Standard 4: Literature - The student will read to contrast meaning and respond to a wide variety of literary forms. 2. Literary Elements - Demonstrate knowledge of literary elements and techniques and how they affect the development of a literary work. a. Develop a knowledge of the literary elements of fiction (plot, problems, attempts to resolve conflicts, resolution, etc.) and the text structure of nonfiction (compare/contrast, cause/effect, sequence, main idea, and details). b. Compare/contrast genres, themes, ideas, and story elements across texts read, listened to, or viewed. c. Identify the author’s purpose (persuade, inform, or entertain). d. Recognize and identify the writer's perspective or point of view in a literary selection (e.g., first person, second person) and how it affects the text. 118

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

1

1

1

T

1

2

1

T

1

1

T

2

T

1

T

2

1

T

1

2

T

1

3

1

T

2

2

1

T

2

1

T

Objectives Standard 5: Research and Information: The student will conduct research and organize information.

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

1. Accessing Information - Select the best source for a given purpose. e. Use the features of informational texts, such as formats, graphics, diagrams, illustrations, charts, maps, and organization, to find information and support understanding. f. Recognize and apply test-taking strategies by answering different levels of questions, such as literal, as well as multiple choice, true/false, short answer, inferential, evaluative, or open-ended.

1

T

1

1

T

2

1

T

2. Interpreting Information - Analyze and evaluate information from a variety of sources. c. Develop notes that include important information on a selected topic.

Field Goals When maintaining the previous quarter, pay special attention to these objectives. Most have several questions on the 2nd benchmark. In order to score those extra points, students need more practice. 1.1-1.3 – Vocabulary 2.1-2.5 – Fluency 3.1 – Literal Understanding 3.2 – Inferences & Interpretations 3.3 – Summary & Generalizations 3.5 – Monitoring and Correction Strategies

119

5th Grade Writing Pacing Guide – 2nd Quarter Month October

Mode Writing examples are connected to reading objectives. Informational/Explanatory Benchmark – Passage based

November

Argumentative/Opinion Pieces

December

Argumentative/Opinion Pieces

Writing should be incorporated across the curriculum. The following are IDEAS. You can choose to use the prompts or use them as a springboard for you own ideas. Since the benchmarks and writing test will be PASSAGE-BASED, it is suggested that a piece of reading of your choice be tied to these prompts.

INFORMATIONAL/EXPLANATORY In relation to the presidential election, produce a three-column chart distinguishing the responsibilities of the government. Explain the importance of checks and balances. (social studies)

ARGUMENTATIVE/OPINION

Write an “I Am” poem relating facts about an important colonial figure such as William Penn, Roger Williams, the Quakers, James Oglethorpe, or Jamestown. (social studies)

Write a letter expressing your opinion to your family back home in England about John Smith’s policy of “NO Work, NO Food”. Support your opinion with accurate quotes from a text. (social studies) After comparing and contrasting the three colonial regions’ natural resources, agriculture, and economic growth, write an argumentative/opinion essay that supports your conclusion on which region would be the best to live in at that time in history. (science) Compare your life now to that of a child in Colonial Jamestown. Write an opinion piece stating which time in history would be best to live in. Cite specific examples to support your opinion. (social studies)

120

My Writing Ideas…

121

LAWTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS Reading Pacing Guide Grade 5

3rd Quarter All objectives from Quarter 1 & 2 should be maintained during this quarter because questions from those objectives will be on the LPS Benchmark Assessment and the OCCT. Standards in italics are not tested but should be taught. Reading/Literature: The student will apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, appreciate, and respond to a wide variety of texts.

Objectives Standard 3: Comprehension/Critical Literacy - The student will interact with the words and concepts in the text to construct an appropriate meaning. 3. Summary and Generalization c. Support ideas and arguments by reference to relevant aspects of text and issues across texts. Standard 4: Literature - The student will read to contrast meaning and respond to a wide variety of literary forms. 1. Literary Genres - Demonstrate knowledge of and appreciation for various forms (genres) of literature. c. Demonstrate an understanding of similarities and differences within and among literary works of various genre and cultures. Standard 5: Research and Information: The student will conduct research and organize information. 1. Accessing Information - Select the best source for a given purpose. d. Use reference features of printed text, such as citations, endnotes, and bibliographies to locate relevant information about a topic. 2. Interpreting Information - Analyze and evaluate information from a variety of sources. b. Select a topic, formulate questions, and synthesize information from a variety of print, nonprint and technological resources (e.g., dictionaries, reference books, atlases, magazines, informational texts, thesaurus, and technology/Internet). d. Summarize information from multiple sources into a written report or summary.

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

1

T

1

T

T

T

T

Field Goals When maintaining the previous quarter, pay special attention to these objectives. Most have several questions on the 3rd benchmark. In order to score those extra points, students need more practice. 1.1-1.3 – Vocabulary 3.3 Summary & Generalizations 2.1-2.5 – Fluency 3.5 Monitoring and Correction Strategies 3.1 – Literal Understanding 4.3 Figurative Language 3.2 – Inferences &Interpretations 5.1 Accessing Information 122

5th Grade Writing Pacing Guide – 3rd Quarter Month January

Mode Writing examples are connected to reading objectives. Informational/Explanatory – Literary Analysis Benchmark – Passage based

February

Narrative - Descriptive

March

Informational/Explanatory

Writing should be incorporated across the curriculum. The following are IDEAS. You can choose to use the prompts or use them as a springboard for you own ideas. Since the benchmarks and writing test will be PASSAGE-BASED, it is suggested that a piece of reading of your choice be tied to these prompts. INFORMATIONAL/EXPLANATORY Literary Analysis: Compare and contrast The Bill of Rights with the introduction to the Declaration of Independence, and the Preamble to the Constitution. How do these documents insure liberty for all people in the new nation? (social studies)

INFORMATIONAL/EXPLANATORY Write a five paragraph essay that describes the events leading up to the American Revolution. Support your topic with evidence from research. Cite your sources accurately. (social studies) You were a witness to the Boston Massacre. Write a fivesenses poem expressing the imagery of the situation: I see… I hear…. I feel…. I smell….. I taste….. (social studies)

NARRATIVE Write a magazine or newspaper article about the efforts of the Sons of Liberty or Daughters of Liberty in showing their opposition to the Sugar and Stamp Acts. (social studies)

Create a class alphabet book of the American Revolution. Use each page to highlight a well-developed paragraph about the topic. Include a detailed illustration. (social studies) Develop a quilt with each square representing a famous patriot, event, or group from the American Revolution. Each quilt square should include a picture and four facts about the topic. (social studies)

123

My Writing Ideas…

124

LAWTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS Reading Pacing Guide Grade 5

4th Quarter Reading and writing with informational text in the content areas will be the focus. Continued instruction will build vocabulary (academic & domain) as a bridge to the 6th grade. These skills will create a Forward PASS to 6th grade. Reading/Literature: The student will apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, appreciate, and respond to a wide variety of texts. Participate productively in self-directed work teams to create observable products. Objectives Standard 1: Vocabulary - The student will develop and expand knowledge of words and word meanings to increase their vocabulary. 1. Words in Context a. Use knowledge of word parts and word relationships, as well as context clues (the meaning of the text around a word), to determine the meaning of specialized vocabulary and to understand the precise meaning of grade level-appropriate words. b. Use prior experience and context to understand and explain the figurative use of words such as similes and metaphors 2. Affixes, Roots, and Stems c. Use word origins, including knowledge of less common roots (graph = writing, terras=earth) and word parts (hemi = half, bio = life) from Greek and Latin to analyze the meaning of complex words (terrain, hemisphere, biography). Standard 3: Comprehension/Critical Literacy - The student will interact with the words and concepts in the text to construct an appropriate meaning. 2. Inferences and Interpretation *e. Participate in creative response to text 3. Summary and Generalization a. Summarize and paraphrase information from entire reading selection including the main idea and significant supporting details b. Make generalizations with information gleaned from text. c. Support ideas and arguments by reference to relevant aspects of text and issues across texts. d. Organize text information in different ways (e.g., timeline, outline, graphic organizer) to support and explain ideas.

125

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

5

2

3

T

2

1

T

1

1

2

T

2

3

3

T

1

1

T

1

T

1

2

T

Standard 4: Literature - The student will read to contrast meaning and respond to a wide variety of literary forms. 2. Literary Elements - Demonstrate knowledge of literary elements and techniques and how they affect the development of a literary work. d. Recognize and identify the writer's perspective or point of view in a literary selection (e.g., first person, second person) and how it affects the text. 3. Figurative Language and Sound Devices - Identify figurative language and sound devices in writing and how they affect the development of a literary work. a. Identify and discuss certain words and rhythmic patterns that can be used in a selection to imitate sounds (e.g., rhythm, rhyme, alliteration). b. Evaluate and identify figurative language, such as simile, metaphors, hyperbole, personification, and idioms. c. Identify the function and effect of common literary devices, such as imagery, metaphor, and symbolism. d. Interpret poetry and recognize poetic styles (e.g., rhymed, free verse, and patterned [cinquain, diamante]). *4. Literary Works - Read and respond to historically and culturally significant works of literature. Example: Compare and analyze literary works from various cultures.

2

1

1

1

1

T

2

2

3

T

2

1

1

T

1

T

2

T

See the Forward PASS for additional objectives to be taught during the 4th quarter after completion of the OCCTs.

126

5th Grade Writing Pacing Guide – 4th Quarter Month

Mode Writing examples are connected to reading objectives.

March

Informational/Explanatory

April

Informational/Explanatory – Literary Analysis of Poetry

May

Narrative

Writing should be incorporated across the curriculum. The following are IDEAS. You can choose to use the prompts or use them as a springboard for you own ideas. Since the benchmarks and writing test will be PASSAGE-BASED, it is suggested that a piece of reading of your choice be tied to these prompts.

INFORMATIONAL/EXPLANATORY Write a literary analysis between two books, poems, or authors. Explain writing techniques, figurative language, and use of character development. (ELA) Choose a scientist/inventor or event from the 20th century and create a biographical data disc on your choice of topics. (science)

NARRATIVE Write an essay about your experience in elementary school. Note teachers, schools, friends, and interests. Be sure to use a chronological sequence. (ELA)

Create a timeline of what you learned about the American Revolution. Note 10 favorite people, places, or events on the timeline. (social studies)

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My Writing Ideas…

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Forward PASS 5th grade 3.1b fiction and nonfiction appropriate to 5th grade 3.3a summarization of text 3.3c support ideas and arguments 5.1a determine appropriate sources 5.1b identify sources and credit sources 5.1c use of text features 5.1d use reference features

6th grade 3.1b fiction and nonfiction appropriate to 6th grade 3.3 a summarization of text 3.3c support reasonable statements 5.1a accessing information 5.1b accessing primary and secondary sources 5.1c use of organizational strategies 5.2a record, organize, and display relevant information from multiple sources 5.2b identify and credit resources

Application of these skills can be obtained through informational writing in the content areas. Modes of writing are to include informational, narrative, and argument. Fluency Objectives In order to promote proficient comprehension of text, a strong continued focus on the fluent reading of grade level text is appropriate. Fluency practice of grade level text should occur daily through the fourth quarter to promote maintenance of comprehension. Vocabulary Objectives Words in context, Affixes, Roots, and Derivatives, Synonyms, Antonyms, Homonyms/Homophones are skills that need continued application as students progress toward the next grade. These vocabulary skills need repeated and extended lessons to promote grade level performance. 129

~NOTES~

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Oklahoma C3 (PASS) Objectives Reading and Language Arts Grade 3 Reading/Literature: The student will apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, appreciate, and respond to a wide variety of texts. Standard 2: Vocabulary - The student will develop and expand knowledge of words and word meanings to increase vocabulary. 1. Words in Context Use context clues (the meaning of the text around the word) to determine the meaning of gradelevel appropriate words.

Grade 4 Reading/Literature: The student will apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, appreciate, and respond to a wide variety texts. Standard 1: Vocabulary - The student will develop and expand knowledge of words and word meanings to increase vocabulary. 1.Words in Context – Use context clues (the meaning of the text around a word) to distinguish and interpret the meaning of multiple meaning words as well as other unfamiliar words.

Grade 5 Reading/Literature: The student will apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, appreciate, and respond to a wide variety of texts. Standard 1: Vocabulary - The student will develop and expand knowledge of words and word meanings to increase their vocabulary. 1. Words in Context a. Use knowledge of word parts and word relationships, as well as context clues (the meaning of the text around a word), to determine the meaning of specialized vocabulary and to understand the precise meaning of grade-levelappropriate words.

Grade 6 Reading/Literature: The student will apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, appreciate, and respond to a wide variety of texts.

b. Use prior experience and context to understand and explain the figurative use of words such as similes and metaphors.

b. Use prior experience and context to analyze and explain the figurative use of words, similes, metaphors, and multiple meaning words.

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Standard 1: Vocabulary - The student will develop and expand knowledge of words and word meanings to increase vocabulary. 1. Words in Context a. Use knowledge of word parts and word relationships, as well as context clues (the meaning of the text around a word), to determine the meaning of technical and specialized vocabulary and to understand the precise meaning of grade-level-appropriate words in fiction and nonfiction texts.

Grade 3 2. Affixes - Use prefixes (for example: un-, pre-, bi-, mis-, dis-, en-, in-, im-, ir-), suffixes (for example: -er, -est, -ful, -ness, ing, -ish, -less), and roots to determine the meaning of words.

3. Synonyms, Antonyms, and Homonyms/Homophones Determine the meanings of words using knowledge of synonyms, antonyms, homonyms/homophones, and multiple meaning words. 4. Using Resource Materials – Use word reference materials (glossary, dictionary, thesaurus) to determine the meaning and pronunciation of unknown words.

Grade 4 2. Affixes, Roots, and Derivatives a. Interpret new words by analyzing the meaning of prefixes and suffixes. b. Use knowledge of root words (e.g., snow, snowbound, snowdrift) and word parts (therm = heat) derived from Greek and Latin to analyze the meaning of complex words (thermometer).

Grade 5 2. Affixes, Roots, and Stems a. Interpret new words by analyzing the meaning of prefixes and suffixes. b. Apply knowledge of root words to determine the meaning of unknown words within a passage. c. Use word origins, including knowledge of less common roots (graph = writing, terras = earth) and word parts (hemi = half, bio = life) from Greek and Latin to analyze the meaning of complex words (terrain, hemisphere, biography). 3. Synonyms, Antonyms, and 3. Synonyms, Antonyms, and Homonyms/Homophones - Apply Homonyms/Homophones - Apply knowledge of fourth grade level knowledge of fifth grade level synonyms, antonyms, synonyms, antonyms, homonyms/homophones, multiple homonym/homophones, and meaning words, and idioms to multiple meaning words to determine the meanings of words determine the meaning of words and phrases. and phrases. *4. Using Resource Materials *4. Using Resource Materials and a. Use a thesaurus to determine Aids related words and concepts. a. Use a thesaurus to determine b. Determine the meanings and related words and concepts. pronunciations of unknown words b. Determine the meanings, by using a glossary and/or pronunciation, and derivations of dictionary. unknown words by using a glossary and/or dictionary.

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Grade 6 2. Word Origins a. Recognize the origins and meanings of foreign words frequently used in English. Example: Understand foreign words that are often used in English such as spaghetti (Italian) and rodeo (Spanish). b. Apply knowledge of root words to determine the meaning of unknown words within a passage. c. Use word origins, including knowledge of less common roots (graph = writing, logos = the study of) and word parts (auto = self, bio = life) from Greek and Latin to analyze the meaning of complex words (autograph, autobiography, biology). *3. Using Resource Materials and Aids

a. Determine the meanings, pronunciation, and derivations of unknown words by using a glossary, dictionary, and/or thesaurus. b. Relate dictionary definitions to context of the reading in order to aid understanding.

Grade 3 *Standard 3: Fluency - The student will identify words rapidly so that attention is directed at the meaning of the text. 1. Read regularly in independentlevel texts (texts in which no more than 1 in 20 words is difficult for the reader) fluently and accurately, and with appropriate rate, change in voice, and expression.

Grade 4 *Standard 2: Fluency - The student will identify words rapidly so that attention is directed at the meaning of the text. 1.Read aloud regularly in independent-level texts (texts in which no more than 1 in 20 words is difficult for the reader) fluently and accurately, and with appropriate rate, change in voice, and expression.

Grade 5 *Standard 2: Fluency - The student will identify words rapidly so that attention is directed at the meaning of the text. 1.Read regularly in independentlevel texts (texts in which no more than approximately 1 in 20 words is difficult for the reader) fluently and accurately, and with appropriate timing, change in voice, and expression.

Grade 6 *Standard 2: Fluency - The student will identify words rapidly so that attention is directed at the meaning of the text.

2. Read regularly in instructionallevel texts that are challenging yet manageable (texts in which no more than 1 in 10 words is difficult for the reader).

2. Read aloud regularly in instructional-level texts that are challenging yet manageable (texts in which no more than 1 in 10 words is difficult for the reader).

2.Read regularly in instructionallevel texts (texts in which no more than approximately 1 in 10 words is difficult for the reader).

2. Read regularly in instructional-level texts (texts in which no more than approximately 1 in 10 words is difficult for the reader; a "typical" sixth grader reads approximately 120 words per minute).

3. Increase reading speed through daily independent reading practice as monitored by the instructor through peer discussions, teacher conferences, response journals, etc.

4. Increase reading through daily independent reading practice as monitored by the instructor through peer discussions, teacher conferences, response journals, etc.

3. Increase silent reading speed through daily independent reading.

3. Read silently for increased periods of time.

. Read silently for increased periods of time.

3. Engage in repeated readings of the same text to increase fluency. 4. Accurately and fluently read 300-400 high frequency and/or irregularly spelled words in meaningful texts. 5. Use punctuation cues (e.g., final punctuation, commas, quotation marks) in text with appropriate phrasing as a guide to understanding meaning.

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1.Read regularly in independent-level texts (texts in which no more than approximately 1 in 10 words is difficult for the reader) fluently and accurately, and with appropriate timing, change in voice, and expression.

Grade 3 Standard 4: Comprehension/Critical Literacy - The student will interact with the words and concepts in a text to construct an appropriate meaning.

Grade 4 Standard 3: Comprehension/Critical Literacy - The student will interact with the words and concepts in a text to construct an appropriate meaning.

Grade 5 Standard 3: Comprehension/Critical Literacy - The student will interact with the words and concepts in the text to construct an appropriate meaning.

Grade 6 Standard 3: Comprehension/Critical Literacy - The student will interact with the words and concepts in the text to construct an appropriate meaning.

Read and understand grade-level-appropriate material. Describe and connect the essential ideas, arguments, and perspectives of the text by using the knowledge of text structure, organization, and purpose. At Grade 6, in addition to regular classroom reading, students read a variety of grade-level-appropriate narrative (story) and expository (informational and technical) texts, including classic and contemporary literature, poetry, magazines, newspapers, reference materials, and online information as well as expository (informational and technical) text.

1. Literal Understanding a. Read and comprehend poetry, fiction, and nonfiction that is appropriately designed for third grade. b. Use prereading strategies independently to preview, activate prior knowledge, predict content of text, and establish a purpose for reading. c. Recall major points in a text and revise predictions about what is read. d. Show understanding by asking questions and supporting answers with literal information from the text.

1. Literal Understanding a. Use prereading strategies independently to preview, activate prior knowledge, predict content of text, formulate questions that might be answered in the text, establish and adjust purposes for reading (e.g., to find out, to understand, to enjoy, to solve problems).

1. Literal Understanding a. Use prereading strategies independently (to preview, activate prior knowledge, predict content of text, formulate questions that might be answered by the text, and establish purpose for reading).

1. Literal Understanding a. Use prereading strategies independently (to preview, activate prior knowledge, predict content of text, formulate questions that might be answered by the text, establish purpose for reading).

b. Read and comprehend poetry, fiction, and nonfiction that is appropriately designed for fourth grade.

b. Read and comprehend both fiction and nonfiction that is appropriately designed for fifth grade.

b. Read and comprehend both fiction and nonfiction that is appropriately designed for sixth grade.

c. Recognize main ideas presented in a particular segment of text; identify evidence that supports those ideas.

c. Recognize main ideas presented in a particular segment of text; identify and assess evidence that supports those ideas. Example: Use a graphic organizer to compare an advertisement to the actual product label.

c. Identify and explain the differences in fiction and nonfiction text.

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Grade 3

2. Inferences and Interpretation a. Make inferences by connecting prior knowledge and experience with information from the text. b. Interpret text, including lessons or morals depicted in fairytales, fables, etc., and draw conclusions from evidence presented in the text. *c. Participate in creative response to text (e.g., art, drama, and oral presentations).

Grade 4

2. Inferences and Interpretation a. Use prior knowledge and experience to make inferences and support them with information presented in text.

Grade 5 d. Use the text's structure or progression of ideas such as cause and effect or chronology to organize or recall information 2. Inferences and Interpretation a. Apply prior knowledge and experience to make inferences and respond to new information presented in text.

b. Make interpretations and draw conclusions from fiction and nonfiction text beyond personal experience.

b. Draw inferences and conclusions about text and support them with textual evidence and prior knowledge.

c. Make inferences and draw conclusions about characters’ qualities and actions (i.e., based on knowledge of plot, setting, characters’ motives, characters’ appearances, and other characters’ responses to a character). *d. Participate in creative responses to text (i.e., art, drama, and oral presentation).

c. Describe elements of character development in written works d. Make inferences or draw conclusions about characters’ qualities and actions (e.g., based on knowledge of plot, setting, characters’ motives, characters’ appearances, stereotypes and other characters’ responses to a character). *e. Participate in creative response to text

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Grade 6 d. Use the text's structure or progression of ideas, such as cause and effect or chronology to locate or recall information. 2. Inferences and Interpretation a. Draw inferences and conclusions about text and support them with textual evidence and prior knowledge.

b. Make inferences or draw conclusions about characters’ qualities and actions (i.e., based on knowledge of plot, setting, characters’ motives, characters’ appearances, other characters’ responses to a character). *c. Interpret and respond creatively to literature (e.g., art, drama, oral presentations, and Reader's Theater).

Grade 3 3. Summary and Generalization a. Summarize by recognizing main ideas, key concepts, key actions, and supporting details in fiction and nonfiction.

b. Make generalizations about a text (e.g., theme of a story or main idea of an informational text). c. Produce summaries of fiction and nonfiction text, highlighting major points.

Grade 4 3. Summary and Generalization a. Paraphrase by recognizing main ideas, key concepts, key actions, and supporting details in fiction and nonfiction to recall, inform, or organize ideas.

b. Support ideas, arguments, and generalizations by reference to evidence in the text. c. Represent text information in different ways such as in outline, timeline, or graphic organizer.

Grade 5 3. Summary and Generalization a. Summarize and paraphrase information from entire reading selection including the main idea and significant supporting details.

Grade 6 3. Summary and Generalization a. Summarize and paraphrase information including the main idea and significant supporting details of a reading selection.

b. Make generalizations with information gleaned from text.

b. Make generalizations based on information gleaned from text.

c. Support ideas and arguments by reference to relevant aspects of text and issues across texts.

c. Support reasonable statements and conclusions by reference to relevant aspects of text and examples.

d. Organize text information in different ways (e.g., timeline, outline, graphic organizer) to support and explain ideas.

d. Clarify understanding of text information in different ways (e.g., timelines, outlines, graphic organizer) to support and explain ideas.

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Grade 3 4. Analysis and Evaluation

Grade 4 4. Analysis and Evaluation

a. Analyze characters including their traits, relationships, feelings, and changes in text.

a. Evaluate new information and hypotheses by testing them against known information and ideas.

b. Distinguish between fact and opinion in nonfiction text. c. Analyze the causes, motivations, sequences, and results of events from a text.

b. Compare and contrast information on the same topic after reading several passages or articles. c. Identify fact/opinion and cause and effect in various texts. d. Analyze and explain the causes, motivations, sequences, and results of events from a text.

Grade 5 4. Analysis and Evaluation a. Identify and analyze the characteristics of poetry, drama, fiction, and nonfiction and explain the appropriateness of the literary form chosen by an author for a specific purpose.

b. Identify the main problem or conflict of the plot and explain how it is resolved. c. Contrast the actions, motives, and appearances of characters in a work of fiction and discuss the importance of the contrasts to the plot or theme. d. Make observations and connections, react, speculate, interpret, and raise questions in analysis of texts. e. Recognize structural patterns found in information text (e.g., cause and effect, problem/solution, sequential order). f. Distinguish among facts/inferences supported by evidence and opinions in text. 137

Grade 6 4. Analysis and Evaluation a. Evaluate the believability of a character and the impact they have on the plot.

b. Analyze the main problem or conflict of the plot; the effect of the qualities of the characters and explain how the conflict is resolved. c. Contrast the actions, motives, and appearances of characters in a work of fiction and discuss the importance of the contrasts to the plot or theme. d. Make observations, connections, and react, speculate, interpret, and raise questions in analysis of texts. e. Recognize and evaluate structural patterns found in a literary work (e.g., cause/effect, problem/solution, sequential order). f. Distinguish among stated facts, inferences supported by evidence, and opinions in text.

Grade 3 *5. Monitoring and Correction Strategies a. Monitor own reading and modify strategies as needed (e.g., recognize when he or she is confused by a section of text, questions whether the text makes sense)

Grade 4 *5. Monitoring and Correction Strategies a. Monitor own reading and modify strategies as needed (e.g., recognizes when he or she is confused by a section of text, questions whether the text makes sense, rereading).

Grade 5 *5. Monitoring and Correction Strategies a. Monitor own reading and modify strategies as needed when understanding breaks down (e.g., rereading a portion aloud, using reference aids, searching for clues, and asking questions).

b. Predict, monitor, and check for understanding using semantic, syntactic, and graphophonic cues.

b. Predict, monitor, and check for understanding using semantic, syntactic, and graphophonic cues.

b. Predict, monitor, and check for understanding using semantic, syntactic, and graphophonic cues.

c. Clarify meaning by rereading, questioning, and modifying predictions.

c. Monitor and adjust reading rate according to the purpose for reading and the difficulty of the text.

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Grade 6 *5. Monitoring and Correction Strategies a. Monitor own reading and modify strategies as needed when understanding breaks down (e.g., rereading a portion aloud, using reference aids, trying an alternate pronunciation, searching for clues, and asking questions).

b. Clarify meaning by questioning and rereading; confirm and revise predictions as needed when reading. c. Adjust reading rate and determine appropriate strategies according to the purpose for reading, the difficulty of the text, and characteristics of the text.

Grade 3 Standard 5: Literature - The student will read to construct meaning and respond to a wide variety of literary forms.

Grade 4 Standard 4: Literature - The student will read to construct meaning and respond to a wide variety of literary forms.

Grade 5 Standard 4: Literature - The student will read to contrast meaning and respond to a wide variety of literary forms.

Grade 6 Standard 4: Literature - The student will read, construct meaning, and respond to a wide variety of literary forms. Read and respond to grade-level-appropriate historically or culturally significant works of literature that reflect and enhance a study of history and social science. Clarify ideas and connect them to other literary works. Participate productively in self-directed work teams to create observable products.

*1. Literary Genres Demonstrate knowledge of and appreciation for various forms (genres) of literature.

*1. Literary Genres Demonstrate knowledge of and appreciation for various forms (genres) of literature.

a. Recognize characteristics of literary genres and forms (e.g., contemporary realistic fiction, historical fiction, nonfiction, modern fantasy, poetry, drama, and traditional stories such as fairy tales and fables).

a. Identify the defining characteristics of a variety of literary genres and forms (e.g. contemporary realistic fiction, historical fiction, nonfiction, modern fantasy, poetry, drama, legends, myths, biography, autobiographies, and b. Read, understand, and discuss traditional stories such as fairy tales and fables). a variety of genres. b. Read and construct meaning from a variety of genres.

1. Literary Genres Demonstrate knowledge of and appreciation for various forms (genres) of literature.

1. Literary Genres - The student will demonstrate a knowledge of and an appreciation for various forms of literature.

a. Recognize characteristics of literary genres and forms (e.g., contemporary realistic fiction, historical fiction, nonfiction, modern fantasy, poetry, drama, and traditional stories such as fairy tales, fables, myths, and legends).

a. Analyze the characteristics of genres, including short story, novel, drama, poetry, and nonfiction.

b. Read and construct meaning from a variety of genres. c. Demonstrate an understanding of similarities and differences within and among literary works of various genre and cultures

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b. Analyze characteristics of subgenres, including autobiography, biography, fable, folk tale, mystery, and myth.

Grade 3 2. Literary Elements Demonstrate knowledge of literary elements and techniques and how they affect the development of a literary work.

Grade 4 2. Literary Elements Demonstrate knowledge of literary elements and techniques and how they affect the development of a literary work.

Grade 5 2. Literary Elements Demonstrate knowledge of literary elements and techniques and how they affect the development of a literary work.

Grade 6 2. Literary Elements - The student will demonstrate knowledge of literary elements and techniques and how they affect the development of a literary work.

a. Compare and contrast plots, settings, or characters presented by different authors and the same author of multiple texts.

a. Identify the main events of the plot, including their causes and effects of each event on future actions, and the major theme from the story.

a. Develop a knowledge of the literary elements of fiction (plot, problems, attempts to resolve conflicts, resolution, etc.) and the text structure of nonfiction (compare/contrast, cause/effect, sequence, main idea, and details).

a. Identify and explain elements of fiction, including plot, conflict, character, setting, and theme.

b. Recognize themes that occur across literary works. Example: Read Yoko by Rosemary Wells and You Are Special by Max Lucado. Discuss the theme of "everyone is unique" that occurs in both stories.

b. Identify the purposes of different types of texts (e.g., to inform, to explain, to entertain). c. Identify themes that occur across literary works. d. Use knowledge of the situation, setting, a character’s traits, motivations, and feelings to determine the causes for that character’s actions.

b. Compare/contrast genres, themes, ideas, and story elements across texts read, listened to, or viewed. c. Identify the author’s purpose (persuade, inform, or entertain). d. Recognize and identify the writer's perspective or point of view in a literary selection (e.g., first person, second person) and how it affects the text.

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b. Identify and explain internal and external conflict in the development of a story. c. Determine the author's purpose (persuade, inform, entertain) and point of view, whether explicitly or implicitly stated and how it affects the text. d. Connect, compare, and contrast ideas, themes, and issues across texts.

Grade 3 3. Figurative Language and Sound Devices - The student will identify figurative language and sound devices in writing and how they affect the development of a literary work. Example: Identify and discuss how certain words and rhythmic patterns can be used in a selection to imitate sounds (e.g., rhythm, rhyme, alliteration).

Grade 4 3. Figurative Language and Sound Devices - The student will identify figurative language and sound devices in writing and how they affect the development of a literary work.

Grade 5 3. Figurative Language and Sound Devices - Identify figurative language and sound devices in writing and how they affect the development of a literary work.

a. Interpret poetry and recognize poetic styles (e.g., rhymed, free verse, and patterned [cinquain, diamante]).

a. Identify and discuss certain words and rhythmic patterns that can be used in a selection to imitate sounds (e.g., rhythm, rhyme, alliteration).

b. Define figurative language, such as similes, metaphors, hyperboles, or personification, and identify its use in literary works.

b. Evaluate and identify figurative language, such as simile, metaphors, hyperbole, personification, and idioms. c. Identify the function and effect of common literary devices, such as imagery, metaphor, and symbolism. d. Interpret poetry and recognize poetic styles (e.g., rhymed, free verse, and patterned [cinquain, diamante]).

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Grade 6 3. Figurative Language and Sound Devices - The student will identify figurative language and sound devices and will analyze how they affect the development of a literary work.

a. Identify and explain figurative language, including symbolism, imagery, metaphor, personification, simile, and idioms. b. Identify and explain sound devices, including alliteration, onomatopoeia, and rhyme. c. Interpret poetry and recognize poetic styles (e.g., rhymed, free verse, and patterned [cinquain, diamante]). d. Identify and describe the function and effect of common literary devices, such as imagery and symbolism.

Grade 3

Standard 6: Research and Information - The student will conduct research and organize information. 1. Accessing Information The student will select the best source for a given purpose.

Grade 4 *4. Literary Works - The student will read and respond to historically and culturally significant works of literature, compare and contrast story elements from tales of different cultures (e.g., compare/contrast adventures of character types, setting, theme).

Grade 5 *4. Literary Works - Read and respond to historically and culturally significant works of literature. Example: Compare and analyze literary works from various cultures.

Grade 6 *4. Literary Works - The student will read and respond to historically and culturally significant works of literature.

a. Analyze and evaluate works of literature and the historical context in which they were written. b. Analyze and evaluate literature from various cultures to broaden cultural awareness.

Standard 5: Research and Information - The student will conduct research and organize information. 1. Accessing Information Select the best source for a given purpose.

Standard 5: Research and Information: The student will conduct research and organize information. 1.Accessing Information Select the best source for a given purpose.

a. Understand the organization of and access information from a variety of sources including dictionaries, encyclopedias, atlases, almanacs, tables of contents, glossaries, and indexes.

a. Determine and use appropriate sources for accessing information including, dictionaries, thesaurus, library catalogs and databases, magazines, newspapers, technology/Internet, encyclopedias, atlases, almanacs, tables of contents, glossaries, and indexes.

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c. Compare similar characters, settings, and themes from varied literary traditions. Standard 5: Research and Information - The student will conduct research and organize information. 1. Accessing Information - The student will select the best source for a given purpose. a. Use library catalogs and computer databases to locate sources for research topics. b. Access information from a variety of primary and secondary sources to gather information for research topics

Grade 3 Grade 4 a. Alphabetize to the third letter. b. Identify key words to be used in searching for resources and b. Use guide words to locate information. words in dictionaries and topics c. Cite information sources in encyclopedias. appropriately. c. Access information from d. Use text formats and charts, maps, graph, schedules, organization as an aid in directions, and diagrams. constructing meaning from nonfiction (expository) text d. Use the title page, table of (e.g., heading, subheading, bold contents, glossary, chapter print, and italics). headings, and index to locate information. e. Locate information in reference texts by using e. Use text formats as an aid in organizational features, such as constructing meaning from prefaces and appendixes. nonfiction (expository) text (e.g., heading, subheading, bold f. Continue to use test-taking strategies by answering print, and italics). different levels of questions, such as open-ended, literal, and interpretive, as well as multiple choice, true/false, and short answer,

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Grade 5 b. Identify and credit the sources used to gain information.

Grade 6 c. Use organizational strategies as an aid to comprehend increasingly difficult content material.

c. Use text features to access information (e.g., format, italics, heading, subheadings, graphics, sequence, diagrams, illustrations, charts, and maps).

d. Note instances of persuasion, propaganda, faulty reasoning, or misleading information in text.

d. Use reference features of printed text, such as citations, endnotes, and bibliographies to locate relevant information about a topic. e. Use the features of informational texts, such as formats, graphics, diagrams, illustrations, charts, maps, and organization, to find information and support understanding. f. Recognize and apply testtaking strategies by answering different levels of questions, such as literal, as well as multiple choice, true/false, short answer, inferential, evaluative, or open-ended.

e. Use reference features of printed text, such as citations, endnotes, and bibliographies, to locate relevant information about a topic.

Grade 3 *2. Interpreting Information The student will analyze and evaluate information from a variety of sources.

a. Begin the research process by selecting a topic, formulating questions, and identifying key words. b. Locate, organize, and synthesize information from a variety of print and nonprint and technological resources (e.g., dictionaries, reference books, atlases, magazines, informational texts, thesaurus, and technology/Internet). c. Compile information into summaries of information. d. Use test-taking strategies by answering different levels of questions, such as open-ended, literal, and interpretive, as well as multiple choice, true/false, and short answer.

Grade 4 *2. Interpreting Information Analyze and evaluate information from a variety of sources.

a. Identify a research question and appropriate sources to answer that question. b. Take notes to paraphrase or summarize information. c. Locate, organize, and synthesize information from a variety of print, nonprint and technological resources (e.g., dictionaries, reference books, atlases, magazines, informational texts, thesaurus, and technology/Internet). d. Report on the findings of research in a variety of formats including written, oral, and/or visual presentations.

Grade 5 2. Interpreting Information Analyze and evaluate information from a variety of sources. a. Follow multistep directions to accomplish a task (e.g., video games, computer programs, recipes).

Grade 6 2. Interpreting Information - The student will analyze and evaluate information from a variety of sources.

b. Select a topic, formulate questions, and synthesize information from a variety of print, nonprint and technological resources (e.g., dictionaries, reference books, atlases, magazines, informational texts, thesaurus, and technology/Internet).

b. Identify and credit the reference sources used to gain information.

c. Develop notes that include important information on a selected topic. d. Summarize information from multiple sources into a written report or summary. e. Create simple documents using a computer and employing organizational features, such as passwords, entry and pull-down menus, word searches, the thesaurus, 144

a. Record, organize, and display relevant information from multiple sources in systemic ways (e.g., outlines, graphic organizers, or note cards).

c. Determine the appropriateness of an information source for a research topic. d. Summarize information from multiple sources into a research paper.

Common Core State Standards Speaking and Listening Standards * stands for securely held content (meaning it should carry over into the next year). This is different from the Oklahoma C3 where the * stands for untested material. Grade 3

Grade 4

Grade 5

Grade 6

Comprehension and Collaboration

Comprehension and Collaboration

Comprehension and Collaboration

Comprehension and Collaboration

1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher led) with diverse partners on grade 3 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher led) with diverse partners on grade 4 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-onone, in groups, and teacher led) with diverse partners on grade 5 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-onone, in groups, and teacher led) with diverse partners on grade 6 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion.

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion.

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion.

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.

b. Follow agreed-upon rules for b. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., gaining the discussions and carry out floor in respectful ways, listening assigned roles. to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion).

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b. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions and carry out assigned roles. c. Pose and respond to specific questions by making comments that contribute to the discussion and elaborate on the remarks of others.

b. Follow rules for collegial discussions, set specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed.

Grade 3

Grade 4

Grade 5

Grade 6

c. Ask questions to check understanding of information presented, stay on topic, and link their comments to the remarks of others.

c. Pose and respond to specific questions to clarify or follow up on information, and make comments that contribute to the discussion and link to the remarks of others.

d. Review the key ideas expressed and draw conclusions in light of information and knowledge gained from the discussions.

c. Pose and respond to specific questions with elaboration and detail by making comments that contribute to the topic, text, or issue under discussion.

d. Explain their own ideas and understanding in light of the discussion.

d. Review the key ideas expressed and explain their own ideas and understanding in light of the discussion. 2. Determine the main ideas and 2. Paraphrase portions of a text supporting details of a text read read aloud or information aloud or information presented in presented in diverse media and diverse media and formats, formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally. including visually, quantitatively, and orally. 3. Ask and answer questions about information from a speaker, offering appropriate elaboration and detail.

3. Identify the reasons and evidence a speaker provides to support particular points.

146

d. Review the key ideas expressed and demonstrate understanding of multiple perspectives through reflection and paraphrasing. 2. Summarize a written text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.

2. Interpret information presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and explain how it contributes to a topic, text, or issue under study.

3. Summarize the points a speaker makes and explain how each claim is supported by reasons and evidence.

3. Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims, distinguishing claims that are supported by reasons and evidence from claims that are not.

Grade 3

Grade 4

Grade 5

Grade 6

Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas

Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas

Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas

Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas

4. Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience with appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details, speaking clearly at an understandable pace.

4. Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience in an organized manner, using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace.

4. Report on a topic or text or present an opinion, sequencing ideas logically and using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace.

4. Present claims and findings, sequencing ideas logically and using pertinent descriptions, facts, and details to accentuate main ideas or themes; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.

5. Create engaging audio recordings of stories or poems that demonstrate fluid reading at an understandable pace; add visual displays when appropriate to emphasize or enhance certain facts or details.

5. Add audio recordings and visual displays to presentations when appropriate to enhance the development of main ideas or themes.

5. Include multimedia components (e.g., graphics, sound) and visual displays in presentations when appropriate to enhance the development of main ideas or themes.

5. Include multimedia components (e.g., graphics, images, music, sound) and visual displays in presentations to clarify information.

6. Speak in complete sentences when appropriate to task and situation in order to provide requested detail or clarification.

6. Differentiate between contexts that call for formal English (e.g., presenting ideas) and situations where informal discourse is appropriate (e.g., small-group discussion); use formal English when appropriate to task and situation.

6. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, using formal English when appropriate to task and situation.

6. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.

147

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Elementary LANGUAGE ARTS - Saluda County Schools

Elementary LANGUAGE ARTS District Essential Map LAWTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS Barry Beauchamp, Superintendent of Schools Revised July 2012 play·book – noun...

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