Middle School Curriculum Handbook - Fulton County Schools

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Fulton County School System

BOARD OF EDUCATION Linda Schultz, President Linda P. Bryant, Vice President Julia C. Bernath • Gail Dean • Catherine Maddox Linda McCain • Katie Reeves Robert M. Avossa, Superintendent

Dear 6th Grade Student: This handbook is provided for you and your parents as an overview of middle school, and to give you some details on what you will be learning in grades sixth through eighth. Please take time to read it with your parents and if there are questions, talk with one of your teachers or a school counselor. Your middle school experience will build upon the skills you learned in elementary school and help prepare you for success in high school. Read carefully about all the exciting topics you will be learning and any options you may have for classes. The curriculum in middle school is rigorous and will require that you put forth your best effort each day. During your middle school years, you will experience tremendous growth and possibly more changes than at any other time in your life. Your school district has designed your middle school years to ensure you are successful in all the challenges and opportunities which await you. Your school’s faculty and staff along with this handbook will assist you in understanding the fundamentals of middle school. Wishing you much success,

Amy Krause. Ed.S Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum and Support

CURRICULUM AND SUPPORT 786 Cleveland Ave., S.W., Atlanta, Georgia 30315-7299 • 404-768-3600 • www.fultonschools.org

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Fulton County School System 786 Cleveland Avenue, SW Atlanta, GA 30315 www.fultonschools.org SUPERINTENDENT Robert M. Avossa BOARD MEMBERS Linda Schultz, President Linda P. Bryant, Vice-President Julia C. Bernath Gail Dean Catherine E. Maddox Linda McCain Katie Reeves

Semester System Placement Procedures Promotion and Retention Progress Reports & Report Cards Guidance and Counseling Testing Programs Testing schedule Services for Students with Disabilities Middle School Structure Grading Scale Textbooks, Library Books & Media Materials Credit for High School Courses Graduation Requirements Special Programs Middle School Remedial Education ESOL Talented and Gifted Title I Core Curriculum Language Arts Mathematics Science Social Studies World Languages Connections Art Education Career Connections Computer Literacy Explorations in Technology Family and Consumer Sciences Health & Physical Education Music Education

Additional Connections

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It is the policy of the Fulton County School System not to discriminate on the basis of race, color, sex, religion, national origin, age or disability in any employment practice, educational program or any other program, activity or service. If you wish to make a complaint or request accommodation or modification due to discrimination in any program, activity, or service, contact Compliance Coordinator, Ron Wade, 786 Cleveland Avenue, SW, Atlanta, Georgia, 30315, or phone 404-763-4585. TTY 1-800-255-0135.

Semester System

Fulton County middle schools operate on a semester system with two 18-week semesters in the regular academic year.

Placement Procedures

Recommendations concerning instructional placement and progress of students are the responsibility of the teacher and other professional staff directly involved with the students. The final decision concerning placement, however, rests with the principal.

Promotion and Retention

Promotion and retention at the middle school level follows the following guidelines. 

Middle school students in grade 6 must have a passing grade in language arts, mathematics, social studies, science and one of the following: a combination of grades in the connections segment or the physical education/health connections segment.



Middle school students in grades 7 and 8 must have a passing grade in language arts, mathematics, social studies, science, reading/world language and one of the following: a combination of grades in the connections segment or the physical education/health connections segment. A passing semester grade in the connections or physical education/health segment is accomplished by earning an average of 70 or above when averaging the combination of two nine-week grades during the semester. Any student who receives an average for both semesters of 69 or below fails the subject for the year.



The student earning a passing grade in an appropriate subject during a summer school session can make up a failing grade in a subject.



Students must score at Level 2 on the 8th grade Criterion Referenced Competency Test (CRCT) in Reading and Mathematics in order to be promoted to ninth grade.



A student shall not be retained more than twice in grades K through 8, except with the approval of the school’s Area Superintendent. In most cases, students who will be 16 years old on or before September 1 are not retained in the middle grades.

Progress Reports and Report Cards

Students receive a Progress Report every four and a half weeks and a Report Card every nine weeks. Progress reports are also issued whenever a student’s performance shows a noticeable decline. Parents should feel free to contact the school about their child’s progress at any time during the semester. Counselors and teachers will be glad to discuss with parents the program and the progress of their child.

Guidance and Counseling

The Guidance and Counseling Department coordinates, supports, and supervises the work of Professional School Counselors and Graduation Coaches. Professional School Counselors impact Student Achievement through Academic, Social/Personal, and Career counseling services. Students receive the services via Individual Counseling, Group Counseling, Classroom Guidance, Transition Guidance, and Consultation. Graduation Coaches’ primary responsibility is to identify at-risk students and to help them succeed in school by keeping them on track academically before they consider dropping out. The Graduation Coaches identify, recruit, and engage parents, concerned adults, organizations, and government agencies to serve in a variety of ancillary roles. Data is used to both evaluate and improve Guidance and Counseling Services.

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Testing Programs

Fulton County Schools participate in both national and state testing programs. The Iowa Tests of Basic Skills (ITBS) Test is an achievement test that measures students’ basic knowledge acquired over time in the areas of vocabulary/reading, language, mathematics, social studies and science. All eighth graders take this test. These test scores are used primarily to evaluate the achievement level of the student against eighth graders across the nation. The Criterion-Referenced Competency Test (CRCT) is a test designed to measure how well students are doing relative to predetermined performance levels on a specified set of education goals included in the curriculum. Students are not compared with other students but are measured on how they have learned specific concepts. All sixth, seventh and eighth graders take this test in the content areas of reading, English/language arts, mathematics, science and social studies. All eighth graders take the Georgia Writing Assessment which measures areas identified in the state’s Georgia Performance Standards (GPS). This test helps to identify students who may need more concentrated instruction in writing before taking the writing portion of the Georgia High School Graduation Test. Middle school students who take a high school course must also take the corresponding End-ofCourse Test. Individual and Group Test Individual assessments to measure aptitude, achievement, mental abilities and career interests are administered by school psychometrists and psychologists at all grade levels as needed. Their concern is to evaluate the psychological and educational aspects of the individual student’s growth and development. School counselors may also administer individual and group achievement, aptitude and career interest assessments.

2011-2012 System-wide Testing Schedule GRADE 6

TEST CRCT*

DATES April 11-18

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CRCT* EOCT

April 11-18 May 2

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Georgia Writing Assessment ITBS CRCT* EOCT

January 18 October 24-28 April 11-18 May 2

*Reading, English/Language Arts, Mathematics, Science and Social Studies This testing schedule is subject to change based on state requirements.

Services for Students with Disabilities

Programs for students with disabilities are provided through the Services for Exceptional Children Department. Programs are offered for students meeting eligibility criteria in the areas of autism, learning disabled, behavior disordered, speech impaired, hearing impaired, visually impaired, physically disabled and intellectually disabled. Students with Disabilities access the Georgia Performance Standards curriculum through use of classroom accommodations, modifications or other supports based on individual learning needs as documented in the student’s Individual Education Program (IEP).

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Questions regarding these and other related services can be directed to the Services for Exceptional Children Department at 404-763-5600, Extension 147.

Middle School Structure

Students are assigned to a team of teachers who are the teachers of the core courses. Connections and physical education/health teachers change for each nine-week period. Students from other teams are also in the connections classes.

Teams may have as few as two teachers or as many as five. A two-teacher team has

approximately 60 students mixed together in core courses. A four-person team has approximately 120 students. One of the team teachers is the student’s advisor or homeroom teacher who watches out for the student during the year. Teams are mixed with students from different elementary schools, different cultures, different strengths and weaknesses, and approximately equal numbers of boys and girls. 1. All middle schools have 300 minutes of core instructional time: language arts, mathematics, social studies, science, and reading/world language. Remedial classes are offered during core instructional time. 2. Connections classes are nine-weeks long. 3. Students who meet all the established criteria may elect to take world language in place of reading in 6th grade or 7th grade if they have a score at or above the 60th percentile in total reading on a nationally normed test or a score of 825 or above on the CRCT. Health objectives are taught in a health/personal fitness connections class. One nine-week health/personal fitness class is required each year. Students in year-long performing music classes take one nine-week physical education class and one nine-week health/personal fitness class each year. Students not in year-long performing music classes take three physical education classes each year and one nine-week health/personal fitness class each year.

Grading Scale

As mandated by the state, students earn numeric grades. Passing grades are 70 and above. 90 and above = A 80-89 = B 70-79 = C Below 70 = F Withdraw/Pass or Fail = W/(1-100) No Grade = NG Incomplete = INC The minimum number of grades used to determine the final grade is nine per semester, per subject area. Nine-week classes may have a minimum of five grades.

Textbooks, Library Books and Media Materials

Textbooks, library books and other media materials are furnished without cost for student use, but remain the property of the Fulton County School System. Students and their parents are held accountable for these materials if lost or damaged, and the school system must be reimbursed. The following sanctions may be taken against a student who fails or refuses to pay for lost or damaged textbooks, library books or media material at the replacement cost:  Refusal to issue any additional textbooks, library books or media material until restitution is made (materials will be available in the classroom) and/or

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Withholding progress reports and report cards until restitution is made.

Credit for High School Courses Taken in Middle School

Students who successfully complete high school mathematics courses and/or two years of the same world language in middle school will receive unit credit toward their high school requirements. Two years of the same world language in middle school equates to one unit of high school world language. If a student has a semester average of below 80, the parent may decline the high school credit. These students would retake a language or mathematics course in high school. High school graduation requirements listed on the next page will help you begin to think about what will be required of you in high school and to let you know the importance of your studies in middle school. High School Graduation Requirements for the Class of 2012 and Beyond AREAS OF STUDY LANGUAGE ARTS 9th Grade Literature/Composition (1.0) 10th Grade Literature/Composition (1.0) American Literature/Composition (1.0) World Literature /Composition (.5) British Literature/Composition (.5) Multicultural Literature (.5) AP Literature/Composition (1.0) College English (1.0) MATHEMATICS GPS Algebra (1.0) OR GPS Accelerated Algebra Honors (1.0) GPS Geometry (1.0) OR GPS Accelerated Geometry Honors (1.0) GPS Advanced Algebra (1.0) OR GPS Accelerated Pre-Calculus Honors (1.0) GPS Pre Calculus (1.0) Mathematics of Finance (1.0) Advanced Mathematical Decision Making (1.0) AP Calculus AB/BC (1.0) AP Statistics (1.0) College Calculus II and III (via GA Tech) SCIENCE Biology (1.0) Physical Science (1.0) Chemistry (1.0) Physics (1.0) Earth Science (1.0) Environmental Science (1.0) Human Anatomy and Physiology (1.0) AP Science Courses – Selective – (1.0) Identified CTE Science Courses – Selective – (1.0) SOCIAL STUDIES World History (1.0) American History (1.0) Economics (.5) American Government (.5) HEALTH & PHYSICAL EDUCATION Health (.5) Personal Fitness (.5) JROTC (3 units to meet the Personal Fitness requirement)

Units Required

4

4

4

3

1

Career Technology Agricultural Education World Language Fine Arts ELECTIVE UNITS

3

4 TOTAL

6

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Special Programs Middle School Remedial Program Remedial education is intended for students in grades 6-12, who have identified deficiencies in reading, writing, and/or in mathematics. This program provides individualized basic skills instruction as mandated by Georgia Law in the areas of reading, writing, and mathematics.

I. Program Structure

The program design is developed in coordination with regular instruction and other educational programs. Development and evaluation of the program involves teachers, administrators, and parents at the school level. Remedial education includes four components:    

Staff Delivery Models Class Size Instructional Segments of Service

Staff - Remedial is staffed by certified teachers with experience and expertise in teaching students with diverse needs and abilities. Remedial funds provide additional staff beyond that provided through regular funds. Delivery Models – Each participating school selects the delivery model(s) to be used. Any combination of state approved models may be used within a school depending on the unique needs and characteristics of the students and school. Class Size – Class size rules for Remedial must follow the state guidelines. Instructional Segments of Service – A segment for grades 6-12 is defined as 50-60 minutes of daily instruction. In order that students receive appropriate instruction, teachers match teaching strategies with a student’s learning style. In addition, remedial teachers use a process of teaching the basic skills that lends itself to an integrated approach across the total curriculum content. Teacher training, in best instructional practices, is provided by Language Arts/Literacy and Mathematics Departments.

II. Eligibility

Eligibility determination is made at the school level by identifying the students functioning below the normal expectation for the respective grade as determined by criteria established by the Georgia Department of Education and the Fulton County School System.

III. Assessment and Accountability

Each year the Georgia Department of Education utilizes data submitted by local school systems during the regular student records collection process to conduct an evaluation of REP. By June of each year, the local school systems report the achievement results to the GADOE of all students who received instructional services through the REP in the content area(s) in which they were served. At a minimum, the evaluation includes a report of the number and percentage of students who passed the grade-level appropriate CRCT in reading, writing, or mathematics. Schools maintain individual student assessment data and report achievement of the students served. This documentation is used to measure student achievement and program success.

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English to Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) ESOL is a standards-based instructional program designed to address the unique challenges faced by students whose first language is not English. The ESOL Program integrates the WIDA Consortium English language proficiency standards with the Georgia Performance Standards (GPS). Students in ESOL develop proficiency in the English language skills of listening, speaking, writing, reading and comprehension while acquiring the academic content of the GPS. All instruction in the ESOL program is provided in English, thereby maximizing students’ opportunity to master social and academic English language skills. Georgia law mandates that students be screened for the ESOL program if their native language, home language, or first language is other than English. Students who are identified by these criteria are tested in accordance with state procedures to determine whether they qualify for ESOL services. All students who qualify for ESOL are tested annually with an English language proficiency measure in accordance with Federal laws. This measure is used to determine language progress and is one of the criteria used for exit from the ESOL program.

Goals

The WIDA English Language Proficiency Standards are: 1. English language learners communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting. 2. English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Language Arts. 3. English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Mathematics. 4. English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Science. 5. English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Social Studies. Students in the ESOL program possess well-developed language skills in one or more languages other than English, and are working to develop proficiency in the English language. When these students attain proficiency in social and academic English appropriate to their age and grade level and no longer need the intensive language support provided by the ESOL program they exit. Exited students are monitored for two years to ensure a smooth transition to mainstream classes.

Levels of Language Proficiency

Level 1 – Entering English language learners at the Entering level will process, understand, produce or use:  pictorial or graphic representation of the language of the content areas  words, phrases or chunks of language when presented with one-step commands, directions, WH-, choice or yes/no questions, or statements with sensory, graphic or interactive support  oral language with phonological, syntactic, or semantic errors that often impede meaning when presented with basic oral commands, direct questions, or simple statements with sensory, graphic or interactive support Level 2 - Beginning English language learners at the Beginning level will process, understand, produce or use:  general language related to the content areas  phrases or short sentences  oral or written language with phonological, syntactic, or semantic errors that often impede the meaning of the communication when presented with one- to multiple-step

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commands, directions, questions, or a series of statements with sensory, graphic or interactive support Level 3 – Developing English language learners at the Developing level will process, understand, produce or use:  general and some specific language of the content areas  expanded sentences in oral interaction or written paragraphs  oral or written language with phonological, syntactic or semantic errors that may impede the communication, but retain much of its meaning, when presented with oral or written, narrative or expository descriptions with sensory, graphic or interactive support Level 4 – Expanding English language learners at the Expanding level will process, understand, produce or use:  specific and some technical language of the content areas  a variety of sentence lengths of varying linguistic complexity in oral discourse or multiple, related sentences or paragraphs  oral or written language with minimal phonological, syntactic or semantic errors that do not impede the overall meaning of the communication when presented with oral or written connected discourse with sensory, graphic or interactive support Level 5 – Bridging English language learners at the Bridging level will process, understand, produce or use:  specialized or technical language of the content areas  a variety of sentence lengths of varying linguistic complexity in extended oral or written discourse, including stories, essays or reports  oral or written language approaching comparability to that of English-proficient peers when presented with grade level material

Talented and Gifted Program (TAG) The Talented and Gifted program (TAG) identifies gifted students based upon State Board of Education Rule 160-4-2-.38. All Fulton County students are screened for the gifted program twice a year. If a student is referred for the gifted program, the school must gather information in the areas of multiple criteria: mental ability, achievement, creativity and motivation. Students must qualify in three of the four areas of multiple criteria in order to be eligible for gifted services.

Philosophy

Intellectually gifted students require specialized educational experiences that promote the development and expression of their potential. If gifted individuals—as children, youths and adults—are to experience fulfilling lives and if society is to derive optimal benefits from gifted individuals’ uncommon potentials, an educational program must be structured to develop more fully their exceptional and varied abilities, interests and talents. The Fulton County gifted program is a response to the need to address the unique learning characteristics, interests, personal needs and capabilities of gifted children. The program emphasizes the gifted student’s need for interaction with intellectual peers. Emphasis on the individual highlights the fact that there are differences among gifted students and a need for specialized educational experiences to meet these differences. Basic to the philosophy of this program is the idea that no one teacher, resource or instructional method can meet the needs of gifted students. Education for the gifted is viewed as a cooperative endeavor characterized, facilitated and realized by the efforts of numerous individuals in the schools and community.

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These goals are accomplished in middle schools by providing advanced courses for identified gifted students. Adjusting the rate and depth of their learning and using a variety of appropriate teaching methods provides differentiation of the basic curriculum. Challenging instructional activities are designed to intensify and extend their particular interests and aptitudes. Identified gifted students are served based upon their academic strengths and can be placed in up to four core curriculum areas—language arts, math, science and social studies. Educational experiences for gifted students provide the additional variety and flexibility necessary to adjust and extend the Fulton County curriculum to meet these individuals’ needs.

Program Goals

In accordance with this philosophy, the following program goals have been adopted: 1. To help teachers, administrators and parents identify gifted students and understand their unique abilities, needs and preferences. 2. To design and implement differentiated instructional experiences in the school and the community. 3. To develop in gifted students an accurate and increasing awareness of themselves, their abilities and their value to society.

Learner Goals

We believe that by meeting the program goals and objectives, we will be able to promote and achieve the following learner goals to develop: 1. Advanced research methods and independent study skills, 2. Creative thinking and creative problem-solving skills in order to be generators of ideas and products which are original to the learners, 3. Higher order and critical thinking skills, 4. Advanced communication skills that incorporate new techniques, materials and formats in the development of products and ideas that will be shared with real audiences.

TITLE I Title I is a federally funded program designed to ensure that all children have a fair, equal, and significant opportunity to obtain a high-quality education and reach, at a minimum, proficiency on challenging state academic achievement standards and state academic assessments. Title I Schools: 2011 – 2012 Bear Creek Elkins Pointe McNair Sandtown Paul D. West Georgia Baptist Children’s Home K.I.P.P. South Fulton Academy

MIDDLE SCHOOLS Camp Creek Holcomb Bridge Renaissance Sandy Springs Woodland OTHER SCHOOLS Hapeville Charter Ridgeview Charter

Goals 

Ensure that high-quality academic assessments, accountability systems, teacher preparation and training, curriculum, and instructional materials are aligned with challenging State academic standards so that students, teachers, parents, and

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 

     

administrators can measure progress, against common expectations for student academic achievement; Meet the educational needs of low-achieving children in our Nation’s highest-poverty schools, limited English proficient children, migratory children, children with disabilities, Indian children, neglected or delinquent children, and young children in need of reading assistance; Close the achievement gap between high and low-performing children, especially the achievement gaps between minority and non-minority students, and between disadvantaged children and their more advantaged peers; Improve and strengthen accountability, teaching, and learning by using State assessment systems designed to ensure that students are meeting challenging State academic achievement and content standards and increasing achievement overall, but especially for the disadvantaged; Provide greater decision making authority and flexibility to schools and teachers in exchange for greater responsibility for student performance; Provide children an enriched and accelerated educational program, including the use of school-wide programs or additional services that increase the amount and quality of instructional time; Provide school-wide reform and ensure the access of children to effective, scientifically based instructional strategies and Challenging academic content; Significantly elevate the quality of instruction by providing staff in participating schools with substantial opportunities for professional development; Coordinate services under all parts of this title with each other, with other educational services, and, to the extent feasible, with other agencies providing services to youth, children and families; and Afford parents substantial and meaningful opportunities to participate in the education of their children.

CORE CURRICULUM English/Language Arts Surely, of all the arts, literature is most immediately implicated with life itself. The very medium through which the author shapes the text-language is grounded in the shared lives of human beings. Language is the bloodstream of a common culture, common history. -Louise Rosenblatt

Philosophy

The English/language arts classroom is a place where students begin to connect their own lives to the lives of others through great literature. A balanced language arts program gives students opportunities to read and respond critically to both literary and information texts; to write creatively, expressively and analytically; to develop effective oral language skills; to investigate and present topics of interest using research methods; and to use media and technology to communicate for a variety of purposes.

Goals

Through the language arts program, the learner will:  Enjoy, appreciate and evaluate language in all its forms.  Listen, read, view and think critically.  Write and speak effectively in a wide variety of formal and informal styles.  Pre-write, draft, revise, edit, publish, and reflect as a means to more effective writing.  Choose and apply appropriate reading strategies in order to analyze and evaluate written texts.

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Sixth Grade English/Language Arts

The curriculum is comprised of Georgia Performance Standards and focuses on the integration of vocabulary, literature, reading strategies, composition, oral language skills, research and grammar. Reading instruction teaches students to use cognitive strategies before, during and after reading to help them monitor their understanding and evaluate the author’s presentation of ideas. A thematic approach allows students and teachers to work collaboratively to explore fiction and nonfiction literature, composition and research. Global concepts such as selfdiscovery, justice for all and moments of truth covered in sixth grade themes have universal appeal. Students participate in the writing process, incorporating grammar study as a part of the revision of their compositions. Oral language and technology instruction is also part of the instruction that helps students become effective communicators. Sixth graders learn to view and question the media and technology, forces that exert a strong influence on teenagers today. Finally, students will learn to conduct research and present their findings through a variety of oral, written, visual and technological media. Textbooks:

Elements of Literature, Introductory Course (Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 2003) The Holt Handbook, Introductory Course (Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 2003) The Holt Reader: Interactive WorkText, Introductory Course (Holt, Rinehart & Winston) Spelling Lessons and Activities, Introductory Course (Holt, Rinehart & Winston)

Seventh Grade English/Language Arts

Seventh grade English/language arts continues with mastery of Georgia Performance Standards and emphasizes the integration of vocabulary, literature, reading strategies, composition, oral language skills, research and grammar. Literature, media and technology experiences become increasingly analytical as students study the elements of the short story, novel, drama, poetry, essay, autobiography, and other fiction and nonfiction genres. The emphasis on becoming strategic readers, critical viewers and effective communicators continues. Students learn to evaluate their own learning. The thematic approach invites students to discover the triumph and tragedy of human experience. Themes include universal concepts such as loyalty and camaraderie. Textbooks:

Elements of Literature, First Course (Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 2003) The Holt Handbook, First Course (Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 2003) The Holt Reader: Interactive WorkText, First Course (Holt, Rinehart & Winston) Spelling Lessons and Activities, First Course (Holt, Rinehart & Winston)

Eighth Grade English/Language Arts

Eighth grade English/language arts focuses on Georgia Performance Standards and is aligned to high school language arts Georgia Performance Standards. While refining writing process skills and grammar knowledge, students produce various kinds of papers and multimedia presentations. Literature study includes novels, plays, short stories, poetry and a variety of nonfiction. The emphasis on strategic processing, critical thinking and analytical reasoning continues and prepares students for rigorous tests such as the PSAT. Textbooks:

Elements of Literature, Second Course (Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 2003) The Holt Handbook, Second Course (Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 2003) The Holt Reader: Interactive WorkText, Second Course (Holt, Rinehart & Winston) Spelling Lessons and Activities, Second Course (Holt, Rinehart & Winston)

Sixth, Seventh and Eighth Grade Reading Students who are not taking world language during seventh and eighth grade are scheduled for a reading course. These courses focus on developing an effective reading process by:

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Research has led to a new conceptualization of the reading process; that reading is a complex learning process. In this new view, readers construct meaning from a text, not simply by decoding words but by using reading strategies that incorporate and expand their prior knowledge. -Dr. Judith Irvin

  

Using reading skills with varied content (fiction and nonfiction); Applying reading strategies consistently before, during and after reading for active comprehension and Selecting the most appropriate reading strategy to use while reading difficult or confusing text.

Students read a variety of texts including fiction (novels, short stories and drama), nonfiction literature (book reviews, autobiography and biography), content-area texts (social studies, science and mathematics) and real-life texts (newspaper articles, speeches, how-to pieces and persuasive essays). Students write to entertain, inform and persuade. Research instruction enables students to access information, evaluate the information for relevancy and accuracy, and then present the information for real-world purposes. Textbooks:

The Literacy Handbook, Grade 6, Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 2003 The Ancient World, Grade 6, Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 2003 The Literacy Handbook, Grade 7, Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 2003 The World in Transition, Grade 7, Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 2003 The Literacy Handbook, Grade 8, Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 2003 The US Change & Challenge, Grade 8, Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 2003 Scholastic Read XL, Grade 6, Scholastic, Inc., 2001 Scholastic Read XL, Grade 7, Scholastic, Inc., 2001 Scholastic Read XL, Grade 8, Scholastic, Inc., 2001 Newbridge Reading Quest Series, 2006

In the Middle School English and Language Arts curriculum, there are two levels for every grade: On Level and Advanced Level. ELA Georgia Performance Standards Strand/Standard Framework K-12 STRAND READING  Concepts of Print  Phonological Awareness  Phonics  Phonics/Word Recognition  Fluency  Vocabulary  Comprehension  Reads 25 Books  Theme  Literary/Historical Content  Reading Across the Curriculum WRITING  Writing Process  Organizational Structure  Genres  Research and Technology  Timed Writing CONVENTIONS  Conventions or Grammar and Usage

K

1

X X X

X X X

X X X

X X X

2

3

4-5

6-8

X X X X

X X X

X X X X

X X X X X X

X X X

X X X

X X X

embedded in writing

 Conventions of Format LISTENING/SPEAKING/VIEWING  Listening, Speaking, Viewing  Listening and Speaking  Viewing

9-12

X X X X X X

X X X

X X X X

X X X X

X X X X X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X X X

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X X

X X

Mathematics Philosophy

Mathematics permeates all sectors of life and occupies a well-established position in curriculum and instruction. Schools must assume responsibility for empowering students with the mathematical skills necessary for functioning in and contributing to today's complex society. Instruction should emphasize the application of mathematics to real world problems; allow the use of calculators and computers as tools in problem-solving, and allow students to develop their own mathematical understanding through the use of concrete materials. The middle school mathematics program is developmentally appropriate and designed to meet students’ intellectual, social and emotional needs. The curriculum and assessment components of the program are conceptually oriented and contain a broad range of content. Curriculum and assessment activities allow students to experience success and help students build positive attitudes toward mathematics and toward themselves as mathematical problem-solvers. Development of students’ abilities to think, to reason, to solve problems and to communicate their understanding of mathematical concepts is a major focus of the program.

Goals

The goals of the K-12 mathematics program are to:  Meet the needs of individual students;  Build students' appreciation of mathematics and its relationship to other disciplines;  Promote students' confidence in their own mathematical abilities;  Assist students in becoming mathematical problem-solvers;  Provide opportunities for students to communicate their ideas about mathematics;  Develop students' mathematical reasoning skills;  Enable students to utilize calculators and computers as problem-solving tools;  Encourage participation in learning with others;  Develop concepts and skills measured on standardized tests, and  Enable parents to understand and support the program.

Program Description

Fulton County Schools implements the Georgia Performance Standards for mathematics. The Fulton County Schools Mathematics curriculum stresses rigorous concept development, presents realistic and relevant applications, and keeps a strong emphasis on computational skills. Teachers utilize a standards based direct instruction delivery model. A direct instruction approach provides students with specific skills-based instruction from their teachers at the beginning of new lessons followed by both guided and independent practice. It includes continuous modeling by the teacher, followed by more limited teacher instruction and then fading teacher instruction as students begin to master the material. Engaging students in problem solving and real-world applications are important aspects of mathematics instruction. The use of technology and manipulatives support the conceptual development of mathematical concepts and skills. The Georgia Performance Standards for mathematics are organized into content standards and process standards. The content standards are organized into five strands: number and operations, measurement, geometry, data analysis and probability and algebra. The process standards are an essential part of learning for all students. Students will use the process standards as a way of acquiring and using content knowledge. At each grade, there are five process standards that emphasize problem solving, reasoning, representation, connections and communication. These strands are consistent throughout the K-12 Mathematics Curriculum.

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Math Georgia Performance Standards K-8 Standards Framework K

1

2

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7

8

X X X X

X X X X

X X X X

X X X X X

X X X X X

X X X X X

X X X X X

X

X

X

X X X

X X X

X X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Students will reason and evaluate mathematical arguments.

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

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Students will communicate mathematically. Students will make connections among mathematical ideas and to other disciplines. Students will represent mathematics in multiple ways.

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CONTENT STANDARDS Number and Operations Measurement Geometry Data Analysis and Probability Algebra PROCESS STANDARDS Students will solve problems (using appropriate technology).

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X = Standard is addressed at the grade level. The curriculum supports instruction and assessment which integrates the use of manipulatives and appropriate technology. Students are encouraged to represent topics in multiple ways including, concrete, pictorial, verbal, written, numerical, graphical, and symbolic. In the Middle School Mathematics curriculum there are two levels for every grade—On-Level and Advanced:  Math 6 On-Level  Math 6 Advanced  Math 7 On-Level  Math 7 Advanced  Math 8 On-Level  Math 8 Advanced There are also two levels for the year-ahead students—Accelerated and Advanced Accelerated:  Math 8 Accelerated (7th graders)  Math 6 Accelerated (5th graders)  Math 8 Advanced Accelerated (7th graders)  Math 6 Advanced Accelerated (5th graders)  GPS Algebra Honors (8th graders)  Math 7 Accelerated (6th graders)  GPS Accelerated Algebra Honors (8th graders  Math 7 Advanced Accelerated (6th graders) Advanced placement is provided by the district to meet the needs of students requiring additional challenge within a standards-based grade level curriculum. The Accelerated Curriculum uses the on-level curriculum of the next grade level and provides support for the grade level CRCT. The advanced Accelerated course uses the advanced curriculum of the next grade level and introduces concepts from the next higher grade level curriculum. For examples, Math 7 Advanced Accelerated uses the Holt textbook series to teach the Math 7 concepts and introduces Math 8 topics. Math 7 Accelerated uses the Pearson textbook series to teach the Math 7 concepts and provides support for the Math 6 CRCT.

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MATHEMATICS 6 Concepts/Skills to maintain from End of Mathematics 6, students will understand the following previous grades: concepts:  Operations with decimal and fractions  four arithmetic operations as they relate to positive rational numbers  Addition and subtraction of common fractions and mixed numbers with  convert between and compute with different forms of rational unlike denominators such as 2, 3, 4, 5, numbers 6, 8, 10 and 12.  the concept of ratio and solve problems using proportional  Modeling multiplication of common reasoning fractions  understand and use line and rotational symmetry  Modeling percent  determine the surface area and volume of solid figures  Graphing data  use variables to represent unknown quantities in formulae,  Multiples and factors algebraic expressions and equations  Perimeter, capacity, and area of  utilize data to make predictions geometric figures  determine the experimental and theoretical probability of a given  Evaluating algebraic expressions event Textbooks: On-Level: Course 1, Pearson, (2008) Advanced Level: Course 2, Holt (2007) Accelerated (year ahead): Course 1, Pearson, (2008) Advanced Accelerated: Course 2, Holt (2007)

MATHEMATICS 7 Concepts/Skills to maintain from previous grades:  Operations with positive rational numbers, including mixed numbers  Line and rotational symmetry  Surface area and volume  Ratio as a representation of quantitative relationships

Textbooks:

End of Mathematics 7, students will understand the following concepts:  use of rational numbers, including signed numbers  solve linear equations in one variable  sketch and construct plane figures  demonstrate understanding of transformations  use and apply properties of similarity  examine properties of geometric shapes in space  describe and sketch solid figures, including their cross-sections  represent and describe relationships between variables in tables, graphs, and formulas  analyze the characteristics of linear relationships  represent and analyze data using graphical displays, measures of central tendency, and measures of variation On-Level: Course 2, Pearson, (2008) Advanced Level: Course 3, Holt (2007) Accelerated (year ahead): Course 2, Pearson, (2008) Advanced Accelerated: Course 3, Holt (2007)

MATHEMATICS 8 Concepts/Skills to maintain from previous grades:  Operations with rational numbers  Properties of equalities  Direct & inverse proportions  Solving multi-step equations  Properties of real numbers  Statistics

Textbooks:

End of Mathematics 8, students will understand the following concepts:  understand different representations of numbers including square roots, exponents, and scientific notation  understand and apply the properties of parallel and perpendicular lines and understand the meaning of congruence  understand and use the Pythagorean Theorem  use algebra to represent, analyze, and solve problems  understand and graph inequalities in one variable  understand relations and linear functions  graph and analyze graphs of linear equations and inequalities  understand systems of linear equations and inequalities and use them to solve problems  apply basic concepts of set theory  determine the number of outcomes related to a given event  use the basic laws of probability  organize, interpret, and make inferences from statistical data On-Level: Course 3, Pearson, (2008) Advanced Level: Algebra I, Holt (2007) Accelerated (year ahead): Course 3, Pearson, (2008) Advanced Accelerated: Algebra I, Holt (2007)

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GPS Algebra Honors Concepts/Skills to maintain from previous grades: This is the first course in a sequence of courses designed to prepare students to take AB or BC Advanced Placement Calculus in the 12th grade. It includes radical, polynomial and rational expressions, basic functions and their graphs, simple equations, fundamentals of proof, properties of polygons, coordinate geometry, sample statistics, and curve fitting. (Prerequisite: Successful completion of 8th Grade Mathematics.) Instruction and assessment should include the appropriate use of manipulatives and technology. Topics should be represented in multiple ways, such as concrete/pictorial, verbal/written, numeric/data-based, graphical, and symbolic. Concepts should be introduced and used, where appropriate, in the context of realistic phenomena.

Textbook(s):

End of GPS Algebra Honors, students will understand the following concepts:

      

explore functions and solve simple equations simplify and operate with radical, polynomial, and rational expressions explore, understand, and use the formal language of reasoning and justification apply properties of polygons and determine distances and points of concurrence use counting techniques and determine probability demonstrate understanding of data analysis by posing questions to be answered by collecting data organize, represent, investigate, interpret, and make inferences from data

Mathematics Course 1, McDougall Littell, (2008)

GPS Accelerated Algebra Honors Concepts/Skills to maintain from previous grades: This is the first in a sequence of mathematics courses designed to prepare students to take AB or BC Advanced Placement Calculus in the 11th grade. It includes radical, polynomial and rational expressions; functions and their graphs; quadratic and radical equations; fundamentals of proof; properties of polygons, circles and spheres; coordinate geometry; sample statistics and curve fitting. (Prerequisite: Successful completion of 8th Grade Mathematics.) Instruction and assessment should include the appropriate use of manipulatives and technology. Topics should be represented in multiple ways, such as concrete/pictorial, verbal/written, numeric/data-based, graphical, and symbolic methods. Concepts should be introduced and used, where appropriate, in the context of realistic phenomena.

Textbook(s):

End of GPS Accelerated Algebra Honors, students will understand the following concepts:

        

use the complex number system. explore functions, solve equations and operate with radical, polynomial and rational expressions. apply properties of polygons, circles and spheres, and determine distances and points of concurrence. explore, understand, and use the formal language of reasoning and justification. apply properties of polygons and determine distances and points of concurrence. use counting techniques and determine probability. demonstrate understanding of data analysis by posing questions to be answered by collecting data. organize, represent, investigate, interpret, and make inferences from data. determine algebraic models from data.

Mathematics Course 1 and Mathematics Course 2, McDougall Littell, (2008)

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Mathematics Scope and Sequence Mathematics 6

                 

Prime Factorization Greatest Common Factor Least Common Multiple Fractions, Decimals and Percents Ratios Proportions Algebraic Expressions One-Step Equations Similar Figures Scale Drawings Customary and Metric Measurement Volume Surface Area Symmetry Solid Figures Experimental and Theoretical Probability Data Frequency and Graphs

Mathematics 7

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Algebraic Expressions Rational Numbers Linear Relationships Verbal Phrases Tables, Graphs and Equations Linear Expressions Solving Linear Equations Direct and Inverse Variation Equations, Tables and Graphs Similarity Congruence Scale Factors Constructions Transformations Similarity Three-dimensional Geometry

                     

Mathematics 8

GPS Algebra Honors

Exponents Scientific Notation Irrational & Rational Numbers Radicals Pythagorean Theorem Parallel lines Cut by a Transversal Ratio of a Segment of Parallel Lines Congruency Functions & Relations Graphs of Linear Equations Parallel and Perpendicular Lines Non-Linear vs. Linear Sequences Scatter Plots and Line of Best Fit Linear Inequalities Systems of Equations and Inequalities Venn Diagrams Sets Probability Tree Diagrams Counting Principle Simple Independent Compound Independent

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         

Permutations Combinations Probability Expected Value Summary Statistics Mean Absolute Deviation Parent Functions Sequences as Functions Simplify Expressions Algebraic Rational Radical Quadratic Equations Simplify and Operate Radical and Rational Expressions Quadratic Equations Rational Equations Radical Equations Quadratic Functions Complex Numbers Quadratic Functions Arithmetic Series Piecewise Functions Regression Algebraic Models

GPS Accelerated Algebra Honors

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Permutations Combinations Probability Expected Value Summary Statistics Mean Absolute Deviation Parent Functions Sequences as Functions Simplify Expressions Algebraic Rational Radical Complex Numbers Quadratic Equations Simplify and Operate Radical and Rational Expressions Quadratic Equations Rational Equations Radical Equations Quadratic Functions Arithmetic Series Piecewise Functions Regression Algebraic Models Inductive/Deductive Reasoning Properties of Triangles, Quadrilaterals, and other Polygons Properties of Geometric Figures in a Coordinate Plane Distance/Midpoint Formula Pythagorean Theorem Properties of Triangles & Quadrilaterals Coordinate Proofs Properties of Circles Central Angles Tangents, Secants & Cords Line Segments Arc Length & Sectors Measures of Spheres Surface Area & Volume

Science Philosophy

The purpose of K-12 science education is to produce a scientifically literate society. Scientific literacy is important because:  An understanding of science offers personal fulfillment and excitement -- benefits that should be shared by everyone.  Americans are increasingly confronted with questions in their lives that require scientific information and scientific ways of thinking for informed decision-making. The collective judgment of our people will determine how we manage shared resources -- such as air, water, national forests, and energy.  Science understanding and ability enhances the capability of all students to hold meaningful and productive jobs in the future.

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 The business community needs entry-level workers with the ability to learn, reason, think creatively, make decisions and solve problems.  Concerns regarding global economic competitiveness stress the central importance of science and mathematics education that will allow us to keep pace with our global competitors.

Goals

The goals of the Fulton County K-12 science program define a scientifically literate society and are for students to:  Experience the richness and excitement of knowing about and understanding the natural world;  Use appropriate scientific processes and principles in making personal decisions;  Engage intelligently in public discourse and debate about matters of scientific and technological concern, and  Increase economic productivity through the use of scientific knowledge, understanding and skills in their careers.

Program Descriptions Grade 6 Earth Science

Students explore earth science by participating in a variety of activities that require them to explore and utilize the habits of mind and the nature of science. The units of study include: the characteristics of science, earth’s materials, earth’s structures and formation, our solar system, evolution of the universe, hydrology, oceanography, meteorology, energy initialization and conservation. Textbook: Holt Science and Technology-Earth Science, Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 2008

Grade 7 Life Science

Students explore life science by participating in a variety of learning activities that require them to explore and utilize the habits of mind and the nature of science. The units of study include: the characteristics of science; diversity of living organisms; structure and function of cells; tissues, organs, and organ systems; biological traits; interdependence of organisms and their environments; inherited traits and evolutionary survival of organisms. Textbook: Holt Science and Technology-Life Science, Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 2008

Grade 8 Physical Science

Students explore earth science by participating in a variety of learning activities that require them to explore and utilize the habits of mind and the nature of science. The units of study include: the characteristics of science; nature of matter; forms and transformations of energy; force, mass, and motion of objects; sound; electromagnetic radiation; gravity, electricity, and magnetism as forces. Prerequisite for Physical Science Level A: TAG qualified and successful completion of Life and Earth Science with a 90% or higher average, and 80% or above in all other TAG classes and 85% in Math 7 Level O or 80% or higher in Math 7 or 8 Level A. Must also have recommendation of Life Science and TAG teacher OR

Science of the Physical World, Level A

TAG qualified and successful completion of TAG Life Science and Earth Science with a 75% or higher average and scored at least 85% in Math 7 Level O or 80% or higher in Math 7 or 8 Level A OR Science of the Physical Successful completion of Life Science and Earth Science with a 85% or World, Level A higher average and scored at least 85% in Math 7 or 8 Level O or A. Physical Science Level O: All other students. Textbook: Holt Science and Technology-Physical Science, Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 2008

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Science Scope and Sequence Grade 6 Earth Science              

Safety Skills Science Inquiry Process Characteristics of Science Scientific Tools and Measurements Scientific Data, Analysis, References, and Writing Science and Technology Earth Materials Hydrology Earth’s structure and Formation Oceanography Weather and Climate Our Solar System Evolution of the Universe Energy Sources, Natural Resource Utilization, and Conservation

Grade 7 Life Science            

Safety Skills Science Inquiry Process Characteristics of Science Scientific Tools and Measurements Scientific Data, Analysis, References, and Writing Science and Technology Diversity of Living Organisms Cells, Tissues, Organs, and Organs Systems. Reproduction Heredity and Genetics Evolution and Natural Selection Ecology

Grade 8 Physical Science            

Safety Skills Science Inquiry Process Characteristics of Science Scientific Tools and Measurements Scientific Data, Analysis, References, and Writing Science and Technology Nature of Matter Forms and Transformations of Energy Force, Mass, and Motion Sound Electromagnetic Radiation Gravity, Electricity, and Magnetism as Forces

Social Studies Philosophy

The purpose of the Fulton County School System’s social studies curriculum is to prepare students to become citizens who participate in a democratic society in an increasingly interdependent world. Through social studies education students should acquire a continuing interest in their society; develop a respect for the dignity and worth of all persons; and achieve the depth of understanding, the loyalty to democratic ideas, and the skills necessary to accept responsibilities and rights of citizenship. As a part of the social studies program, students are provided with learning opportunities that enable them to grow in their ability to think clearly and to integrate significant facts, concepts and generalizations from history and the social sciences into their own experiences. Students develop useful skills for obtaining knowledge, devising questions and engaging in problem-solving techniques through active involvement in the curriculum. Equally important, they should learn how to analyze issues from multiple perspectives and to test the validity of ideas apart from the sources of those ideas. Students are also encouraged to develop connections among ideas and events, both past and present that will promote cooperative and constructive solutions of problems and issues.

Goals

The social studies curriculum is designed to:  Increase students’ knowledge of the world and promote greater awareness of its diverse ethnic and cultural elements  Reinforces the understanding of how a highly differentiated U.S. society maintains cohesion through adherence to the principles found in the Constitution and Bill of Rights  Address concerns related to their social origins  Acquire the skills, knowledge and perspectives necessary to achieve success in this global age.

Program Descriptions

Grade 6 Physical and Cultural Geography of the Modern World The emphasis in sixth grade is on the study of history, geography and culture of selected regions: Europe, Latin America, Canada, Australia and Oceania. Each unit focuses on a geographic overview, historic development, people and culture, political systems and economic systems. Textbook:

The World and Its People, Glenco, 2005

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Grade 7 World Geography and History The emphasis in seventh grade is on the study of history, geography and culture of selected regions: Africa, the Middle East and Asia. Each unit focuses on a geographic overview, historic development, people and culture, political systems and economic systems. Textbook:

People, Places and Change, Holt, 2005

Grade 8 Georgia Studies Students trace the history of Georgia in the context of the development of the United States. A chronological focus includes a geographic overview and early inhabitants, the foundation of Georgia in the 18th century through the state’s development in the 20th century. Students also examine the characteristics of state government, public issues, citizen rights and responsibilities, and contemporary and historical comparisons of state and national political institutions. Textbook:

Georgia and the American Experience, Clairmont Press, 2005 Social Studies Scope and Sequence GRADE 6 World Studies

GRADE 7 World Studies

Europe

Africa

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Geographic overview Historic development People and Culture Political systems Economic systems

Geographic overview Historic development People and Culture Political systems Economic systems

GRADE 8 Georgia Studies Geography of Georgia   

Geographic overview Early inhabitants European exploration

Canada & Latin America

Middle East

Colonial - Modern Georgia

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Geographic overview Historic development People and Culture Political systems Economic systems

Geographic overview Historic development People and Culture Political systems Economic systems

Colonial Georgia Georgia and the Revolution Early statehood Georgia’s westward movement Civil War and Reconstruction Rise of modern Georgia Modern Georgia

Oceania & Australia

Asia

Foundations of Georgia Government

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Geographic overview Historic development People and Culture Political systems Economic systems

Map and Globe Skills Problem Solving Locating, Analyzing and Evaluating Data

Geographic overview Historic development People and culture Political systems Economic systems

Map and Globe Skills Problem-Solving Locating, Analyzing and Evaluating Data

The Georgia General Assembly The Governor and Executive Branch The Judicial Branch Local government in Georgia

Map and Globe Skills Problem-Solving Locating, Analyzing and Evaluating Data

World Language Philosophy

Since education is a means by which to prepare students for the complicated world that they inhabit and also to give to them tools with which to understand new challenges, world language study is made available to students in middle school. A number of studies have shown that there is a direct correlation between the amount of time devoted to language study and the language proficiency that students attain. Beginning in middle school, students have an opportunity to build a long sequence of language study to become proficient in using language for communication. World language study is far more than a system to be explained. It is a very important link to the world around us.

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Goals

Students will be able to:  Learn and use basic words, phrases and expressions  Develop careful listening skills  Develop cultural awareness  Develop linguistic awareness  Develop an interest in world languages for continued language study

Program Description

Students have an opportunity to enroll in nine-week world language connections courses designed to introduce them to the sound system, cultural information, and using and understanding basic expressions. Students are engaged in a variety of hands-on and role-play activities to immerse themselves in the target language. These experiences will help students determine which language(s) they will pursue in the seventh and eighth grades and beyond. Grades 6, 7 and 8 Students may begin formal language study in either the grade six or seven grade by selecting the one language, offered at their school, they would like to pursue. At the conclusion of the grade eight world language program, students will have completed the equivalent of the level one high school course and will be eligible for level two language study in grade nine. Students who successfully complete the grade eight course may receive one unit of credit toward high school graduation. Successful completion can be defined as four (4) semesters of the same World Language in which the student has received a grade of 70 or above. A passing grade is necessary in the first and second semester of grade seven and the 1st and 2nd semester of the grade eight to receive a High School credit. Passing scores are based on individual semesters and are not averaged. Textbooks:

¡En espanõl (uno) McDougal, Little (2004) Discovering French, McDougal, Littell, 2004 Komm mitt! Holt, Rinehart, Winston, 2003 Obentoo, Thompson Learning, 1999 Latin Is Fun, AMSCO, 2003 Phenomenon of Language, Tabula Latina, 1990 Cambridge Latin Course – Unit 1, Cambridge University Press, 2003 Cambridge Latin Course – Unit 2, Cambridge University Press, 2003

Assessment Assessment is an important part of the educational process that communicates the value which our society places on learning, and assessment results keep both parents and students informed about their progress in the course. Students are evaluated in a variety of ways including unit tests and quizzes (both teacher-made and commercially-produced), oral performance on designated material as well as impromptu situations, responding to questions and other language expressions, class participation, projects, and completion of class and homework assignments. Performance based assessments are also used throughout the school year to assess student proficiency in speaking and writing. District-wide Final Common Assessments are given at the end of the school year to seventh and eighth grade students to assess overall student performance.

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CONNECTIONS Art Education Philosophy

A comprehensive approach to art education in Fulton County Schools integrates four areas of study: art history, art criticism, aesthetics and art production. Art education, as a subject in our elementary, middle and high schools, is based on the belief that looking at, talking about and studying art are as important as making art.

Goals The arts, like science, are about discovery and invention. The arts, like social studies, are about worlds and cultures beyond our personal experience.





The arts, like math, are about systematic divisions of time and space. The arts, like sports, are about pushing to the limit for a singular achievement and working cooperatively to accomplish a goal.



The arts are also about play, and play, too, is essential to learning.



B.J. Adler, Education Director National Young Audiences, Inc.

Art education is embedded within contexts and culture across and time. We not only incorporate issues and concerns of cultural diversity, we celebrate, and support them with hundreds of multicultural resources. An interdisciplinary approach to learning benefits all subjects. Art teachers are encouraged to work with interdisciplinary subject area teachers as well as other exploratory teachers to integrate curriculum content into art and art content into curriculum. In keeping with a system-wide focus on reading, both reading and writing across the curriculum are essential components of art education from elementary through high school. As hardware and software become increasingly accessible in middle school art labs, art teachers are guiding students to sue technology in art education as a “medium” for art production, as well as for research and reporting.

Program Description

Locally adopted textbooks and text resources, including software, support the middle school art education curriculum. Fine art reproductions, slides, videos, books, art games and other resources are readily available. The curriculum is fully consistent with the Georgia Performance Standards for Arts by the Georgia Department of Education. As scheduling configurations of middle schools vary, so do art offerings: some middle schools have one art teacher, some two; some include art teachers in interdisciplinary teams and some schools maintain a schedule of nine week connections courses. Middle schools with two art teachers are able to offer more options, developing specialized courses such as Photography, World Art and Art and Technology.

Course Description

Curriculum and instruction for middle school art education courses are tailored to meet the variety of experience levels within art classes at grades 6, 7 and 8. Art textbooks designated as primary texts by grade level are often used interchangeably at all three grade levels, based on needs of individual classes. Visual Arts 6 Emphasis is on art to communicate personal meaning and developing skills in drawing, design, painting and sculpture or ceramics. Students work to create art and study artworks, with information and activities integrated from art production, art criticism, art history and aesthetics. Primary textbook: Art: A Personal Journey (Davis) Visual Arts 7 Emphasis is on communication through visual art. Students work in a variety of materials and approaches to create art and study artworks. Information and activities are integrated within this emphasis from art production, art criticism, art history and aesthetics. Primary textbook: Art: A Community Connection (Davis)

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Visual Arts 8 Emphasis is on art production and developing skills in drawing, painting and sculpture or ceramics. Information and activities are integrated from art history and aesthetics, as well. Primary textbook: Art: A Global Pursuit (Davis)

Career Connections Career Development is a vital component in the education of the youth of Georgia. The development and utilization of career exploration skills is essential for all citizens, but especially for middle school youth, in today’s world of rapid change and complex choices. It is the responsibility of the school system to provide opportunities for all of its students to develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary for effective career exploration to ensure more satisfied, productive citizens in the future.

Philosophy

The Career Connections course assists students in examining personal interests, abilities, and values in relation to educational and career opportunities, This course develops knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary for systematic career exploration and tentative decision-making,.

Goals         

Develop a sense of personal worth; be aware of potential to develop fulfilling careers Utilize effective goal-setting and decision-making strategies to make tentative educational and career decisions Develop critical thinking skills Understand the role and realities of work in individual lives and in effective functioning of the economic system Identify and effective utilize a variety of reliable resources of occupational, educational and career information Recognize the impact of stereotyping, bias and discrimination on personal career exploration and planning Assess both present and emerging personal characteristics to facilitate career decisions Acquire attitudes and behaviors that facilitate success at school and in the workplace Understand the value and relevance of both present and life-long learning

Program Description

Career Connections is a developmental middle school career exploration program divided into three individual courses that provide students opportunities to develop skills and knowledge necessary to make effective educational and career-based decisions. Sixth Grade Career Connections This course assists students in developing self-esteem and self-understanding and in understanding the relationship between self-concept and career-life satisfaction. Seventh Grade Career Connections This course focuses on developing career research skills in identifying and utilizing major print and nonprint sources; interviewing, observing and shadowing workers; projecting self into the realities of the workplace; developing a personal ethic and practicing effective communication and interpersonal skills. Eighth Grade Career Connections This course primarily prepares students to use decision-making skills to reach immediate educational goals (e.g., four-year plans for high school) and to consider postsecondary educational and career choices.

Assessment

The assessment process is an integral part of the Career Connections courses. It is essential to a student’s total education to assess not only how a student completes projects and activities but also what the student has learned about each area of study. Progress and proficiency are measured through a variety of methods including laboratory performance, individual and group projects, notebooks, class work, class participation, oral reports, independent study, and written examinations.

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Career Connections Scope and Sequence Grade 6 Career Connections Orientating to Career SelfAwareness Skills Identifying Self Characteristics Developing Parent(s)/Significant Other(s) as a Resource in Understanding Self Developing Self Esteem

Grade 7 Career Connections Orienting to Career Research Skills Communicating at School and at Work Researching Careers

Grade 8 Career Connections Orienting to Career DecisionMaking Skills Developing Decision-Making and Goal-Setting Skills Choosing Directions for High School

Projecting Self into the Working World

Considering Postsecondary Options

Projecting Self into Future Work and Life Roles Exploring Occupations

Understanding the Economy Developing Personal Management Skills

Valuing Education

Business and Computer Science Philosophy

The study of computers is important because computers have become a powerful learning medium. Computer education provokes decision-making and manipulation of visual environments. Through computers, learning tasks can become more individualized, thus enabling students to receive immediate feedback. Computer education leads to greater initiative and more autonomous learning. Computers are so pervasive in today’s society, computer literacy is a worthy goal. Students learn to make educated decisions through computer knowledge. Computer education provides students with a thorough and sequential learning process that enables them to build skills for the future for personal and professional needs.

Goals      

     

Prepare equipment and work area Demonstrate proper use of equipment and display appropriate keyboarding posture Introduce the alphabet, number and symbol characters Identify correct finger use for striking each letter Demonstrate appropriate keyboarding techniques Control the keyboard at a useful level of operation with a minimum speed of 15 words a minute for one minute with four or fewer errors Key and edit materials using simple proofreader’s marks and appropriate marks of punctuation Create, edit and format documents using a word processing program Demonstrate proper care and handling of hardware and software Identify and describe the parts of the computer and its functions Identify basic components of and utilize a spreadsheet program Identify basic components of and utilize a database program

Program/Course Description

Computer education is taught to all students in the Fulton County Schools. Computer classes are curricular subjects for which students receive grades. Texts and materials include one computer per student, texts and teacher-generated resources. Computer courses are divided into three areas by each grade level: sixth grade studies keyboarding, seventh grade word processing and eighth grade computer applications. Sixth Grade Business and Computer Science The essential concept of this course is to introduce students to the basic skills associated with word processing and presentation software and productivity. Students will review and continue to refine their keyboarding skills. Students will gain greater understanding and application of word processing software features to integrate with their core content courses and real world simulation activities. This course offers

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students the opportunity to develop research and leadership skills while studying technology’s impact on society and Internet safety. Seventh Grade Business and Computer Science The essential concept of this course is to introduce students to the basic skills that are associated with word processing and presentation productivity. Students will gain an understanding and application of word processing features to integrate with their core content courses and real world simulation activities. Students will also be introduced to database management and spreadsheet software. This course offers students the opportunity to develop research and leadership skills while also studying technology’s impact on society, careers, and Internet safety. Students will review and continue to refine their keyboarding skills. Eighth Grade Business and Computer Science The goal of computer applications is to efficiently and effectively process documents by utilizing computer application skills and relate these capabilities to career opportunities. The students produce block letters with open punctuation and short reports utilizing word processing. Spreadsheet and database programs are introduced. Student productions include bold, underscore, horizontal center, word-wrap, error correction with back space and delete keys, cursor movement, inserting/deleting lines, line spacing, right justification, spell check, save, name, retrieve, print, sorting, formatting fields, searching a database, functions and formulas, copy, cut and paste.

Assessment

The assessment process is an integral part of the study of computers. It is essential to a student’s total computer education. Progress and proficiency are measured through a variety of methods including speed, accuracy, technique, daily work, written examinations, projects, documents, lessons, teacher observation and class participation. Computer Literacy Scope and Sequence Grade 6 Business & Computer Science Equipment use Keyboard characters and manipulation Technique and posture Computer components

Careers

Grade 7 Business & Computer Science Keyboarding technique

Grade 8 Business & Computer Science Keyboarding technique

Computer components Word processing Hardware and software use Employability skills

Computer Applications Networking Programming FBLA (Co-curricular Student Organization) Careers

Careers

Instructional modules that complement the above topics are included in curriculum resources.

Explorations in Technology Philosophy

We live in a complex society. The rate of change and technological advancement in our society is increasing at an accelerating pace. Through the Explorations in Technology Program, students learn about technology and its impact on our society. Explorations in Technology calls on students to use their basic knowledge through exciting, and meaningful, modular studies in several technology studies.

Goals

Explorations in Technology is taught to develop technologically literate students who:  Can use the decision-making process effectively  Can weigh the benefits and risks of varying technologies  Understand current advancements in technology and how they have grown from earlier progress  Are willing to use the tools of technology to attempt solutions to real problems

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 Are familiar enough with basic technology devices to understand that complex devices are often merely a collection of simple parts  Realize the impact of different technologies on social, political, ecological, economic, mechanical, financial and technological systems and can predict the likely effect of new developments

Program/Course Description

Explorations in Technology includes studies in several areas that include:  Construction and Manufacturing  Communication  Energy and Power  Aerodynamics/Aviation  Desktop Publishing  Robotics  Bio-Technology  Radio and Television  Computer Assisted Drafting Explorations in Technology provides hands-on activities for students to increase their abilities in solving practical problems, make informed decisions about their future course of studies, and understand the impact technology has on our society. Explorations in Technology also teaches the importance of responsibility, leadership, cooperation, dependability, respect of others and the development of desirable work habits, attitudes and self-worth. Delivery System Sixth, seventh and eighth graders are introduced to high technology systems through the modular approach. Students rotate through two modules in the course of a nine-week grading period per year. During middle school, students have the opportunity to complete six different modules.

Assessment

Student assessment includes but is not limited to:  individual projects  group projects  written examinations  class participation  oral reports Engineering Technology Scope & Sequence Grade 6 Exploring Engineering & Technology Aerodynamics Aerospace Audio broadcasting Aviation Bio-related Computer-aided design/drafting Computer-aided publishing Electronics Electronic communications Material processing Meteorology and weather Problem solving Research and design Robotics Societal impacts of technology

Grade 7 Invention and Innovation Aerodynamics Aerospace Audio broadcasting Aviation Bio-related Computer-aided design/drafting Computer-aided publishing Electronics Electronic communications Material processing Meteorology and weather Problem solving Research and design Robotics Societal impacts of technology

Grade 8 Technological Systems Aerodynamics Aerospace Audio broadcasting Aviation Bio-related Computer-aided design/drafting Computer-aided publishing Computer numerical control Electronics Electronic communications Material processing Meteorology and weather Problem solving Research and design Robotics Societal impacts of technology

Each year the students rotate through different areas to acquire a thorough understanding of the high tech world in which they live.

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Family and Consumer Sciences Philosophy

Family and Consumer Sciences introduces and prepares students for the life skills that will enable both males and females to balance roles and responsibilities within the home, family and work place. The curriculum prepares students to cope with a rapidly changing world. It also helps students develop a better understanding of the areas that have an impact on the quality of life for individuals and families such as developing self, relating with family members, developing wellness, managing resources and personal space, and applying clothing skills.

Goals             

Explore the areas of personal development, family living, home management, foods and nutrition, and clothing skills through hands-on activities and projects Explore management resources in the area of personal and family living Promote ethical behavior, responsible citizenship and non-abusive behavior Establish guidelines for nutritional wellness Teach consumer skills Teach life coping skills that will enable students to live practical, productive lives Develop decision-making skill Identify tools, techniques and technology related to Family and Consumer Sciences Develop an atmosphere conducive to teamwork and cooperative learning Establish skills in clothing selection, care and construction Establish guidelines for promoting personal and family relationships Understand and promote ethical behavior as consumers, producers and citizens Understand the cultural diversities that govern the global marketplace

Program/Course Description

Family and Consumer Sciences connections are offered to all sixth, seventh and eighth grade students except those enrolled in band, orchestra or chorus. These students may be assigned to Family and Consumer Sciences as a seventh or eighth grade connections class. At the sixth-grade level, the curriculum focuses on examining characteristics of a person with positive selfconcept, developing ways to strengthen relationships, choosing foods that contribute to personal health, preparing simple food items, displaying appropriate work habits. At the seventh-grade level, the curriculum focuses on housing and home management; how to take routine care of clothes; evaluating nutritional needs of adolescents; performing appropriate food and kitchen sanitation and safety procedures; and preparing simple food items and demonstrating appropriate table etiquette. At the eighth-grade level, the curriculum focuses on exploring consumer choices in clothing; analyzing clothing labels to select and care for clothes; developing a plan for clothing storage and organization, and analyzing methods for personal space management. The curriculum also focuses on demonstrating management skills for time, energy and money; examining advertising in relation to consumer purchasing skills; and evaluating consumer rights and responsibilities.

Assessment

The assessment process is an integral part of the study of Family and Consumer Sciences. It is essential to a student’s total education to assess not only how a student completes projects and activities but also what the student has learned about each area of study. Progress and proficiency are measured through a variety of methods including laboratory performance, individual and group projects, notebooks, class work, class participation, oral reports, independent study, and written examinations.

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Family and Consumer Sciences Scope & Sequence Grade 6  Positive self-concept

Grade 7

Grade 8

 Housing and home management  Personal space management

 Management skills

 Safe work habits

 Clothing storage and organization  Adolescent nutritional needs

 Consumer rights and responsibilities  Equipment safety

 Table etiquette

 Kitchen and food safety

 Consumer choices

 Sewing skills

 Table etiquette

 Analyzing clothing labels

 Sewing safety

 Clothing care

 Sewing skills

 Sewing skills

 Strengthening relationships  Food choices

 Evaluating advertising

 Careers

Instructional modules that complement the above topics are included in curriculum resources.

Health & Physical Education Philosophy

The purpose of the Fulton County Health and Physical Education program is to provide:  A developmentally appropriate and comprehensive experience in health and physical education essential for meeting the diverse needs of all students.  Quality health and physical education to foster the development of motor skills, physical fitness, emotional strength, maturity, values, healthful decision-making, and the pursuit of life-long health and fitness;  Participation in daily health and physical education as an integral and inseparable part of the total K12 educational experience.

Goals      

Provide a developmentally appropriate and comprehensive experience through exposure to a wide variety of activities and quality instruction at all levels Have students recognize that participation in health and physical education can lead to an understanding and appreciation of diversity Provide for the development of effective and efficient fundamental motor skills Promote the acquisition of skills and beliefs needed to pursue a lifetime of involvement in physical activity and healthful decision- making Provide an environment which is safe and conducive to self-expression, enjoyment and creativity Promote the relationship between health and physical education, school, community and life through an interdisciplinary approach to instruction where appropriate

Health Education Philosophy

The enhancement of health knowledge, attitudes and problem-solving skills is the focus of instruction in middle school health education. Health objectives are taught in a health/personal fitness connections class. One nine-week health/personal fitness class is required per year. Health education is built on a comprehensive approach with each of the following components covered during grades six through eight: nutrition, fitness, emotional and mental health, safety and injury prevention, growth and development, family and relationship skills, diseases and disorders, consumer health, environmental health, and substance use and abuse. These components are combined into wellness, drug education, life skills and human sexuality units of instruction.

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Parent(s) have the option of removing their child from the human sexuality unit of each grade. This unit is taught as part of the nine-week course, thus allowing parents adequate time to review materials used in the course, talk with the teacher and make an informed decision about their child’s participation. Parents must notify the school in writing if they choose to remove their child from the unit.

Program Descriptions

Sixth Grade Health Education The wellness unit focuses on fitness and nutrition, emotional and mental health, and safety. The drug education unit includes instruction on communication skills, peer pressure, decision-making, and tobacco, alcohol and other drugs. Finally, the human sexuality unit contains instruction on the human body, growth and puberty, sexually-transmitted diseases including HIV/AIDS, prevention of sexuallytransmitted diseases and pregnancy with a focus on abstinence as the healthiest choice, and decisionmaking. Textbook: Teen Health, Course 1, Glencoe/McGraw Hill, 1999 Seventh Grade Health Education The wellness unit includes mental, social and emotional health; first aid, fitness and nutrition instruction. Instruction in the drug education unit focuses on decision-making, influence of advertising on decisionmaking, peer pressure, chemical dependency, alcohol, tobacco and other drugs. The human sexuality unit focuses on the functions of the male/female reproductive system, sexually-transmitted diseases including HIV/AIDS, abuse, decision-making, and refusal skills. Textbook: Teen Health, Course 2, Glencoe/McGraw Hill, 1999 Eighth Grade Health Education For eighth graders, the wellness unit focuses on health careers, first aid, fitness and nutrition. The drug education unit includes instruction in communication skills, resisting negative peer pressure, effects of drugs on the unborn child, the dangers of steroid use and making healthy decisions. Sexuality education centers around dating, rape/date rape, developing healthy relationships, and prevention of sexuallytransmitted diseases and unwanted pregnancy with a focus on abstinence. Textbook: Teen Health, Course 3, Glencoe/McGraw Hill, 1999

Assessment Student learning is measured throughout the nine-week segment, both formally and informally, and through unit tests. Other methods of assessment include written reports, group projects, homework, class projects, journal writing and class participation.

Physical Education Students take three nine-week physical education classes and one nine-week health/personal fitness class each year of middle school unless enrolled in a year-long performing music class. Students in year-long performing music classes take one nine-week physical education class and one nine-week health/personal fitness class each year. For safety and hygiene reasons, all students are required to dress out for physical education. Schools provide a physical education uniform for students at a minimal cost to the student; locker rooms and lockers are available in all schools. Sixth and Seventh Grade Physical Education During the four nine-week grading periods each year, three blocks of physical education courses and one nine-week health/personal fitness class are offered. Students are offered a variety of courses within each block including fitness, individual sports, team sports, new games, outdoor education, and dance. The primary goal of the instruction is to improve motor skills and fitness levels, develop appreciation of activity and participation in activity, and experience success in movement.

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Eighth Grade Physical Education Eighth grade instruction focuses on the transition to high school physical education. There is a variety of course offerings including fitness, team sports, individual sports, outdoor education, dance, gymnastics and aerobics.

Assessment

Student learning is measured in terms of skill development, participation and knowledge of a particular sport or activity. Progress is measured using a variety of methods including checklists, written and oral tests, skill tests, individual and group projects, class participation and teacher observation. Physical Education Middle School Sequence

Grade 6

Grade 7

Quarter 1 Unit 1 Fitness

Quarter 2 Unit 2 Floor Hockey

Quarter 3 Unit 3 Basketball

Quarter 4 Unit 4 Fitness

Pickle Ball

Soccer

Dance

Recreational Games

Volleyball

Team Handball

Lacrosse

Softball

Football

Ultimate Frisbee

Outdoor Education

Track And Field

Fitness

Floor Hockey

Basketball

Fitness

Tennis

Soccer

Dance

Recreational Games

Volleyball

Team Handball

Lacrosse

Softball

Ultimate Frisbee

Outdoor Education

Track And Field

Fitness

Floor Hockey

Dance

Fitness

Tennis

Soccer

Basketball

Recreational Games

Volleyball

Team Handball

Lacrosse

Softball

Football

Ultimate Frisbee

Outdoor Education

Track And Field

Football

Grade 8

****Units should be taught for 15 days. Each unit should be taught within the 9 week segment indicated in the chart. Three activities should be taught each quarter. Some quarters have 4 activities listed – three of four should be selected based on facilities, staff size, equipment and other variables.

MUSIC EDUCATION Philosophy

Music is an art, a discipline and a subject area with its own field of knowledge. It is unique and complete within itself, yet it supports and enriches other learning. As people engage in music performances, they draw upon the sum total of all the experiences they have ever undergone. If education is to be defined as the development of the total individual or the total personality, we believe music is an essential component of the education process, for music is a basic dimension of life.

Goals

A complete music program:  Includes experiences in consuming and performing music.  Allows students to value and appreciate the contributions of other students and other cultures.  Include collaboration with the other disciplines of the curriculum towards the development of the total child through a comprehensive educational experience.

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Program Descriptions General Music

General music is offered to all students except those enrolled in band, orchestra or chorus. Certified music specialists teach all music classes. Elective courses are offered at the eighth grade level in general music, piano, guitar and electronic music. These classes are curricular subjects for which students receive grades. Textbook: Making Music, Silver Burdett (Scott Foresman), 2005

Choral Music

Middle school students may elect chorus in sixth, seventh and eighth grades. These classes are taught by music specialists daily. The individual schools set membership criteria. These are curricular courses for which grades are given. Middle school choral students are offered numerous performance opportunities throughout the year, including assemblies, PTA meetings, GMEA Large Group Performance Evaluation, and others. They may perform as members of select vocal assembles, honor choirs, or in school musicals. Textbook: Experiencing Choral Music, Glencoe/McGraw Hill, 2005

Instrumental Music

Band and orchestra are offered in all middle schools. Instruction is given on instruments commonly found in these ensembles. Students are placed in classes according to their grade and/or achievement levels, as determined by the teacher. Beginning instruction is offered for sixth and seventh grade students in all middle schools. Sixth and seventh grade students are taught band or string classes during Connections time. Eighth grade students may take band or strings as an elective. Middle school students may study only one music subject or instrument per grading period. They may change music subjects, instruments or leave the program only at term changes (as allowed by the school). Students are given opportunities to perform in school in school bands and orchestras, jazz ensembles and a variety of chamber groups. These groups often rehearse after regular school hours. Performance opportunities in the middle schools include PTA meetings, school assemblies, field trips, and GMEA district large-group and solo ensemble festivals. Band and orchestra are curricular subjects for which students receive grades. Band Textbooks:

Standard of Excellence (Books 1 & 2), Kjos, 2004 Foundation for Superior Performance, Kjos, 1997 Standard of Excellence Jazz Method, Kjos, 1998 Chop Monsters, Alfred, 2002

Orchestra Textbooks: Essential Elements for Strings 2000, (Books 1 & 2), Hal Leonard, 2002

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Music Education Scope and Sequence  General Music (K-8)

Choral Music (5-12)

Instrumental Music Woodwinds (4-12)

Instrumental Music Percussion (4-12)

 Distinguish among specific voices

 Interpretation

 Apply performance standards

 Dynamics

 Dynamics

 Phrases

 Rhythmic patterns

 Phrases

 Chord Patterns

 Chord sounds

 Apply performance standards  Phrases

 Tonality

 Chromatics

 Directed listening

 Chord patterns

 Technology

 Sight reading

 Tune timpani

 Chromatics

 Distinguish among instruments  Up-down/step-leap patterns  Music technology

 Apply performance standards

Instrumental Music Strings (4-12)

Read treble & bass clef

 Technology

 Critique

 Articulation patterns

 Musical form & analysis

 Sight reading

 Singing games

 Directed listening

 Write music

 Ethnic percussion

 Articulation patterns

 Major & minor scales

 Musical form & analysis

 Individual/group perform

 Melodies & phrases

 Folk activities

 Interpret texts

 Transposition

 Audition procedures

 Dances

 Apply performance standards

 Write music  Individual/group performance

 Musical form & analysis

 Multi-meter

 Transposition

 Scale patterns

 Ethnic music

 Tuning & intonation procedures

 Refined tuning & intonation

 Musical form & analysis

 Chord patterns

 Audition procedures

 Multi-meter

 Intervals

 Ethnic music

 Style periods

 Intervals

 Choral passages

 Tuning & intonation procedures  Multi-meter

 Style patterns

 Audition procedures

 Career opportunities

 Intervals

 Double/triple tonguing

 Play in small ensemble

 Audition procedures

 Chord functions

 Career opportunities  Small ensemble performances  Vocalize

 Play in small ensemble

 Set drumming

 Small ensemble playing

 Improvise

 Improvise

 Style periods

 Style periods

 Make instruments

 Compose

 Marching techniques

 Marching techniques

 Compose  Simple & complex musical forms  Musical texture

 Arrange

 Alternate fingerings

 Vocalize

 Style periods  Full & string orchestral techniques  Alternate positions

 Conduct

 Vocalize

 Improvise

 Vocalize

 Coach

 Improvise

 Compose

 Improvise

 Complex meters  Scale & chord construction  Critique  Cultural & historical context  Career opportunities

 Leadership

 Compose

 Arrange

 Compose

 Arrange

 Conduct

 Arrange

 Conduct

 Coach

 Conduct

 Coach

 Leadership

 Coach

 Style periods

 Leadership

 Leadership

Music Education Scope and Sequence General Music (6-8)

Choral Music (5-12)

Instrumental Music Woodwinds (4-12)

Instrumental Music Percussion (4-12)

Instrumental Music Strings (4-12)

 Breathing

 Identify instrument components  Assembly

 Tone production

 Identify instrument components  Assembly

 Sing

 Pitches

 Hold instrument properly

 Basic note/rest values

 Hold instrument properly

 Play

 Rhythms

 Posture

 Posture

 Posture

 Loud-soft

 Scales

 Tone production

 Counting system

 Tone production

 High-low

 Arpeggios

 Maintenance

 Maintenance

 Fast-slow

 Basic note/rest values

 Embouchure

 Recognize sounds

 Counting system  Distinguish written pitches

 Fingerings

 Rhythmic patterns  Distinguishing written Pitches  Simple meters

 Basic note/rest values

 Dotted rhythms

 Basic note & rest values

 Respond to music

 Posture

 Listen

 Recognize voices

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 Stick and mallet grip

 Bowing  Fingerings

 Recognize instruments

 Dotted rhythms

 Counting system

 Dynamics

 Counting system

 Steady beat

 Tempo

 Tempos

 Create

 Repeats

 Rhythmic patterns  Distinguish written pitches

 Songs & song stories

 Distinguish aural pitches

 Simple meters

 Expression

 Intervals

 Dotted rhythms

 Distinguishing aural Pitches  Tuning

 Rhythmic patterns  Distinguish written pitches

 Accompaniments

 Simple meters

 Dynamics

 Scales

 Dynamics

 Vocabulary

 Melody

 Tempos

 Simple rudiments

 Tempos

 Rhythm

 Harmony

 Repeats

 Musical vocabulary

 Melody

 Memorize

 Distinguish aural pitches

 Public performing

 Harmony  Group and individual singing  Multi-cultural music

 Projection  Major & minor key signatures  Diction

 Tuning  Major & minor key signatures  Scales

 Phrases  Major and minor key signatures  Complex rudiments

 Repeats  Distinguishing aural pitches  Tuning  Major & minor key signatures  Scales

 Long-short

 One part harmony

 Fingering systems

 Sight reading

 Fingering systems

 Beat-no beat  Accompaniment-no accompaniment

 Two-part harmony

 Articulation

 Accents

 Articulation

 Sight reading

 Key signature

 Triplets

 Bowing systems

 Repeats

 Individual/group performance

 Complex meters

 Music writing

 Key signature

 Song forms

 Key signatures

 Musical terminology

 Create new texts

 Written & aural pitches

 Instrument play

 Voice recognition

 Repeats

 Simple meters  Dotted rhythms

 Public performance

 Individual/group performing  Compound meters

 Musical terminology

 Technology

 Technology

 Public performance

 Complex meters

ADDITIONAL CONNECTIONS Available at Selected Schools… Adventure Quest

This nine-week course teaches trust-building, communication skills, decision-making, using cooperative games and initiatives. Students learn and practice the concept of “full value” and are encouraged to transfer it to their daily lives. (“Full value” is a concept of respect for different opinions and values without making a judgment.) Students are also taught how to support others, and recognize their own and others’ leadership skills.

Debate

Students explore and learn how to collect and organize pertinent data relative to opposing positions on a chosen debate topic. In addition to basic research skills, students practice setting up both a defense and refutation with logic and persuasive oral arguments. Debate is practiced individually and in teams.

Library Research Skills

Library research skills prepare students to conduct a research investigation using strategies which support life-long learning. Students will learn how to: (1) define a problem; (2) identify all possible reference sources; (3) locate information within sources; (4) use/engage sources (e.g., read, hear, view) by extracting relevant information; (5) organize information from multiple sources and present the results; and (6) evaluate the results (effectiveness) and the process (efficiency).

Conflict Resolutions

The ultimate goal of this nine-week course is to help students recognize and appreciate the diversity within themselves and others in order to create a more positive school climate. The students are empowered with the skills to constructively respond to conflict situations at home, at school and in the community.

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Participants in the course explore individual strengths and weaknesses, learning styles and basic personality types to increase self-understanding; and recognize diversity in peers, family and community to encourage broader acceptance of others. Students develop effective verbal and nonverbal communication skills; incorporate learned methods of problem-solving as they deal with conflict situations; and increase knowledge about the mediation process. By helping students to develop a repertoire of constructive alternatives for handling their daily problems, students benefit by having a feeling of more personal control over the choices they make in their encounters with others.

Photography

Students explore the general principals of light and optical imagery on photosensitive surfaces. An introduction to photographic artistry using exposure, aperture and focal techniques rounds out the curriculum. Students have an opportunity to obtain limited experience using various types of photography equipment including the development of negatives in a darkroom.

Print Journalism

Students study the structure of a newspaper and learn about the different types of news writing. News magazines are also used, as well as online news services. The last two or three weeks are spent in the computer lab where the students publish their own newspaper with sections on news, editorials, features, sports and ads.

Speech

Speech is an introduction to oral skills with performance as the major criteria for evaluation. The purpose of this class is to improve the student’s personal speaking skills in both informal and formal speech situations that middle school students might encounter. During the nine weeks, each student participates in a variety of speech experiences. The delivery techniques of rate, volume, expression, enunciation and audience contact are emphasized.

Study Skills

Study skills is a nine-week course designed to teach students how to make better use of their time. It emphasizes independent skills in the areas of language arts, reading, math, science and social studies, and increases scores on class work for students as they incorporate these techniques into their daily routines. Study skills also increases self-esteem and confidence as the student’s ability to achieve increases, which also helps increase test scores for individual students.

Video Journalism

Students create short videotape programs as a medium to relate information to the student body. The production of the video program involves specific objectives including pre-production, scripting, storyboarding and planning. In addition, students are involved in the production of videotaping, complete with music and sound effects. The post-production process involves editing and audio dubbing.

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Middle School Curriculum Handbook - Fulton County Schools

Fulton County School System BOARD OF EDUCATION Linda Schultz, President Linda P. Bryant, Vice President Julia C. Bernath • Gail Dean • Catherine Mad...

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