Purchasing & Supply Management Handbook.pdf - Institute of

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Contents 1 Introduction 2 The Institute of Commercial Management (ICM) 3 ICM Articulation Agreements with Universities 4 Learning, Teaching and Assessment Strategy 4.1 Assessment 4.2 Student Workload 5 ICM Qualifications and Progression 5.1 ICM Certificates (equivalent to NQF Level 4 Diplomas) 5.2 ICM Diplomas (equivalent to NQF Level 5 Diplomas) 5.3 ICM Advanced Diplomas (equivalent to NQF Level 6 Diplomas) 5.4 ICM Graduate Diplomas (equivalent to NQF Level 6 Diplomas) 5.5 ICM Post Graduate Diplomas (equivalent to NQF Level 7 Diplomas) 5.6 Relative Positioning of ICM Qualifications 6 Student Registration & Course/Level Entry Requirements 6.1 Student Registration 6.2 Student Registration Fees 6.3 Course/Level Entry Requirements 7 Examinations and Results 7.1 Examinations 7.2 Examination Entry Fees and Forms 7.3 Examination Timetable 7.4 Examination grades and remarking 7.5 Examination re-sits 7.6 Examination Closing Dates 7.7 Examination Results 7.8 Examination Grades 7.9 Transcript of Academic Results 7.10 Replacement Certificates 7.11 Deferrals 7.12 Subject Exemptions for Professional Programmes 7.13 Single Subject Candidates 8 Subject advice, educational guidance and student support 8.1 Study Methods 8.2 Payment Methods 8.3 Choosing your course of study 8.4 ICM Approved Centres 9 Textbooks 10 Students with learning difficulties 11 Copies of past examination papers and other forms of assessment 12 Unit Information 12.1 Programme Objectives 12.2 Recommended Course Duration 12.3 Examination Grades

1 1 1 3 3 3 4 4 4 5 5 6 6 8 8 8 8 10 10 10 10 10 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 12 12 12 12 13 13 13 13 13 14 14 14 14 14

12.4 Continuing Education 12.5 Entry Requirements 13 Course Structure 13.1 Unit Syllabuses 13.1.1 Customer Service Syllabus 13.1.2 Negotiation Syllabus 13.1.3 Quantitative Methods for Managers Syllabus 13.1.4 Stores Management & Stock Control Syllabus 13.1.5 Supply Chain Management Syllabus 13.1.6 International Purchasing & Supply Syllabus 13.1.7 Logistics Syllabus 13.1.8 Operations Chain Management Syllabus 13.1.9 Purchasing & Supply Law Syllabus 13.1.10 Purchasing Strategies Syllabus

15 15 16 16 17 22 25 29 34 36 40 43 50 55

1

Introduction

The purpose of this Course Handbook is to provide you with general information about studying with the Institute of Commercial Management (ICM). This Handbook should be read in conjunction with other Guidelines available on the ICM website. The early pages of this Handbook provide general information about ICM and its programmes. Later sections give details about the equivalency of ICM Certificate (NQF* Level 4 qualifications), Diploma (NQF Level 5 qualifications), Advanced Diploma (NQF Level 6 qualifications), Graduate Diploma (NQF Level 6 qualifications) and Post Graduate Diploma Awards (NQF Level 7 qualifications). Please note that not all Levels are available for all programmes. The material in this Handbook is as accurate as possible at the time of production. *NQF: the UK National Qualifications Framework

2

The Institute of Commercial Management (ICM)

Established in the early 1970s, the Institute of Commercial Management provides academic and vocational qualifications which are well recognised globally. In its capacity as a course developer and an examining and certifying Board, the Institute offers a wide range of professional and vocational awards in Business, Management and related vocational areas. ICM programmes are designed to address the personal development and training needs of those wishing to enter the commercial sector and to support the continued development and workplace flexibility of those already in employment. ICM’s global services include the design, development and certification of business education and training programmes for education providers; the development and certification of tailored education and training programmes for the corporate sector, emerging industries and the global workforce and the examination, assessment and certification of students undertaking business, management and related vocational education programmes. An acknowledged specialist in the design and development of progressive, practical and multi-functional programmes of study, the Institute works with a range of public and private sector clients including universities, business schools, colleges, training providers, International Development Agencies, government agencies and local authorities. ICM provides examinations in more than 200 subject areas ranging from accounting and finance to tourism and hospitality and from marketing and advertising to project management and examines and certifies candidates to an internationally consistent standard.

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ICM Articulation Agreements with Universities

The Institute has formal partnership arrangements with universities in the UK and overseas. A full list of progression routes from ICM qualifications into Undergraduate and Post Graduate courses at UK Universities is available from the ICM website. Established articulation arrangements provide direct access to the second and final years of a wide range of BA/BSc degrees for ICM Diploma qualifications (Level 5 Diploma) and

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Advanced Diploma qualifications (Level 6 Diploma). Access to Masters programmes also exist for those with ICM Graduate Diplomas (Level 6) and ICM Post Graduate Diplomas (Level 7). In addition, ICM Certificate (Level 4 Diploma) holders may be eligible for entry to year 1 of appropriate degrees. Subject to status and grades obtained, students holding ICM Diploma qualifications at levels 4, 5, 6 and 7 are accepted onto Undergraduate and Post Graduate degree programmes offered by institutions in continents across the globe. Our strategic partners have agreed that students can enter their degree programmes with Advanced Standing, provided they possess the right Grade profile and are able to meet other admissions criteria, such as language competence. The stated grade and points requirements may be subject to local variations. Entry to the First Year Application for entry to the first year of a relevant degree programme will be considered for those students who hold a relevant ICM Certificate Level Award. Entry to the Second Year Application for entry to the second year of an Honours degree programme will be considered for students who have passed a relevant ICM Diploma (Level 5) programme and have met the following requirements:  obtained at least 24 Points from 8 subjects leading to the qualification  obtained at least a Grade C in all subjects in the Diploma Entry to the Final Year Students who have passed a relevant ICM Advanced Diploma (Level 6 Diploma) programme will be considered for final year entry if they have achieved the following:  obtained at least 32 Points from 12 subjects leading to the Advanced Diploma  obtained at least a Grade C in all subjects in the Advanced Diploma Entry to the Post Graduate Year Students who have passed a relevant ICM Graduate Diploma (Level 6 Diploma) programme will be considered for entry to Masters programmes if they have achieved the following:  obtained at least 12 Points from the final 4 subjects leading to the qualification  obtained at least a Grade C in all subjects in the Graduate Diploma

Converting ICM subject grades into points The following rules apply in relation to converting ICM subject grades into points:    

an ‘A’ grade is awarded 6 points a ‘B’ grade is awarded 4 points a ‘C’ grade is awarded 2 points a ‘D’ grade is awarded 0 points

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Progression Routes Students wishing to progress to degree programmes should review the range of courses available at our partner Universities. Information on appropriate university courses can be obtained from our website. The Institute’s qualifications are also recognised by leading professional examining bodies for either subject exemption or registration purposes. Further details can be obtained from the appropriate examination bodies.

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Learning, Teaching and Assessment Strategy

Tuition in preparation for the Institute’s examinations takes place on a number of levels, including lectures, seminars, class discussion and problem review and analysis. Formal lectures provide a foundation of information, which students build on through directed learning and self-managed study outside the classroom. Students are actively encouraged to form study groups to discuss course material, fostering a greater depth of learning experience.

4.1 Assessment Assessment for the majority of programmes is based on final examinations. The Institute has a traditional approach to assessment. Formative assessment is provided by ICM Teaching Centres as and when appropriate and may include; essays, in-class tests, role play exercises, presentations and projects. However, in terms of gaining a professional qualification, and in order to maintain standards, ICM believes that students should be formally assessed on the body of knowledge covered during the course and be examined as individuals on the required learning outcomes. 4.2 Student Workload In accordance with nationally accepted codes of practice in the UK, each 20 credit unit represents a total of approximately 200 hours of learning. Typically, each ICM award at undergraduate level comprises four units of 20 credits each. Students must complete four units at each level leading to the awards of Certificate (Level 4 Diploma), Diploma (Level 5 Diploma), Advanced Diploma (Level 6 Diploma) and Graduate Diploma (Level 6 Diploma). Thus, for example, in order to gain an ICM Advanced Diploma, a student must have completed the Certificate, Diploma and Advanced Diploma stages. The Post Graduate Diploma (Level 7 Diploma) consists of 120 credits divided into six units. The learning hours for each unit are subdivided into appropriate categories of learning opportunities, such as lectures, seminars, preparation time, directed study, time spent on assessment items and exam preparation. At least one quarter of this time is usually devoted to formal contact time. A further one quarter of this time is related to directed learning. The balance of workload is comprised of individual, self-managed student learning and revision.

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Note that for a unit delivered in standard mode, the ICM examinations calendar accommodates a teaching year of approximately 2 x 20 teaching weeks, and four weeks of revision/end of year assessment. Furthermore, each unit is assigned to a particular ‘Level’, with each Level corresponding to the group of subjects contained within the programmes leading to the award of a Certificate (Level 4 Diploma), Diploma (Level 5 Diploma), Advanced Diploma (Level 6 Diploma), Graduate Diploma (Level 6 Diploma) or Post Graduate Diploma (Level 7 Diploma).

5

ICM Qualifications and Progression

Understanding your qualification is important and the following guidelines outline how ICM qualifications fit within the UK National Qualifications Framework and support vocational learning. ICM has benchmarked its qualifications against the UK National Qualifications Framework (NQF). In recognition of the NQF levels and with reference to appropriate National Occupational Standards, the Institute has produced the following level descriptors which should be read in conjunction with the table provided in section 5.6. 5.1 ICM Certificates (equivalent to NQF Level 4 Diplomas) ICM Certificates are awarded to those who have passed Part 1 (the first four or five subjects, depending on the course) of an ICM Diploma programme. See below for ICM Diploma Entry Requirements. ICM Certificates represent a level of qualification that recognises the ability to gain, and where relevant apply a range of knowledge, skills and understanding. ICM Certificate holders should be able to display competence in the application of knowledge in the performance of a range of work activities, some of which may be routine and predictable with some being complex or non-routine. Learning at this level involves gaining knowledge and skills appropriate for individuals working semi-independently, or receiving basic supervision and training from others in their field of work. Students should begin to develop a degree of individual responsibility or autonomy in their study as well as the ability to collaborate with others, for example through participation in work groups or teams. Successful completion of the ICM Certificate enables entry to the first year of appropriate degree programmes at a range of Universities. For a complete list of progression routes please refer to the website. 5.2 ICM Diplomas (equivalent to NQF Level 5 Diplomas) Entry to an ICM Diploma programme requires completion of secondary education or an equivalent and recognised programme of study. ICM Diplomas represent a level of qualification which recognises the ability to gain, and where relevant apply a range of knowledge, skills and understanding.

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ICM Diploma holders should be able to display competence in the application of knowledge in a broad range of varied work activities performed in a wide variety of contexts, most of which are complex and non-routine. Learning at this level involves obtaining detailed knowledge and skills appropriate for people working independently, or providing basic supervision and training of others in their field of work and people wishing to go to University. Progression is available from the ICM Diploma to the second year of relevant degree programmes at a range of Universities. For a complete list of progression routes please refer to the website. 5.3 ICM Advanced Diplomas (equivalent to NQF Level 6 Diplomas) Entry to an ICM Advanced Diploma programme requires completion of the ICM Certificate and Diploma in the selected programme. Students holding other relevant and equivalent qualifications which contain ICM Diploma subjects could qualify for entry as well as subject and Level exemptions. ICM Advanced Diplomas represent a level of qualification which involves specialist learning and detailed analysis of a high level of information, knowledge and skills in a specified area of work or study. Students undertaking an ICM Advanced Diploma should demonstrate the depth of knowledge and understanding of an area of work or study to enable them to formulate solutions and responses to complex problems and situations. ICM Advanced Diplomas are appropriate for people working in positions such as Senior Supervisors, Professionals or Managers. These individuals need to demonstrate significant levels of knowledge, a high level of work expertise in job roles and competence in managing and training others. Learning at this level is appropriate for people working in technical and professional jobs, and/or managing and developing others. The ICM Advanced Diploma is equivalent to NQF Level 6 and in terms of level and credit value these qualifications are comparable to UK Intermediate Higher Education qualifications such as HNDs, Diplomas of Higher Education and Foundation Degrees. Progression is available from ICM Advanced Diplomas to the final year of relevant degree programmes at a range of Universities. For a complete list of progression routes please refer to the website.

5.4

ICM Graduate Diplomas (equivalent to NQF Level 6 Diplomas)

Entry to an ICM Graduate Diploma programme requires prior completion of the ICM Diploma and Advanced Diploma in the selected programme. Advanced Standing and Exemptions: Students holding relevant degrees and equivalent qualifications which contain ICM Certificate, Diploma and Advanced Diploma subjects could qualify for entry as well as subject and Level exemptions. Students at this level study highly developed and complex levels of knowledge enabling the development of in-depth and original responses to complicated and unpredictable problems and situations.

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Learning at the Graduate Diploma level involves the demonstration of high level specialist professional knowledge appropriate for senior professionals and managers. Indicative competencies involve the application of a range of fundamental principles across a wide and often unpredictable variety of contexts as well as the ability to perform technical or professional work activities in a variety of contexts with a substantial degree of personal responsibility and autonomy. A qualification at this level is appropriate for people working as knowledge-based professionals or in professional management positions. This qualification is equivalent to a Bachelors degree, and progression is available from the ICM Graduate Diploma to Post Graduate programmes such as Masters degrees. 5.5 ICM Post Graduate Diplomas (equivalent to NQF Level 7 Diplomas) Entry to an ICM Post Graduate Diploma programme requires completion of an ICM Graduate Diploma, another Level 6 award, or a degree level qualification in an appropriate discipline. Refer to Section 6 for Advanced Standing arrangements for mature candidates. Students at this level of study should display a mastery of high level knowledge and skills and have professional and research-based skills. This qualification is equivalent to two thirds of a Masters degree (MBA or MA) and advanced standing can be given onto a range of Masters degrees. For a complete list of progression routes please refer to the website.

5.6

Relative Positioning of ICM Qualifications

The following table gives an indication of the relative positioning of ICM awards, compared with other types of qualifications and levels. Reference is made to levels in the UK National Qualifications Framework and example qualifications at each level. In addition, the final column in the table (FHEQ) shows the ‘equivalent’ qualifications commonly being developed and delivered in the University sector. For example, these indicate that the ICM Advanced Diploma equates to an intermediate level award (in terms of credit accumulation this ICM qualification equates to a Higher National Diploma). Furthermore, the ICM Graduate Diploma equates to a Bachelors degree level qualification and the ICM Post Graduate Diploma equates to a Masters degree level qualification.

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Relative Positioning of ICM Qualifications

National Qualifications Framework Framework for (Levels and example vocational ICM Levels qualifications) Level 7 Professional Diploma in Translation

Level 6 Diploma in Management

ICM Post Graduate Diploma (Level 7 Diploma)

M (masters), Masters degrees, Post Graduate certificates and diplomas

ICM Graduate Diploma (Level 6 Diploma)

H (honours) Bachelors degrees (BSc/BA)

ICM Advanced Diploma (Level 6 Diploma)

I (intermediate) Diplomas of higher education, foundation degrees, Higher National Diplomas

Level 5 ICM Diploma BTEC Higher National Diploma in 3D (Level 5 Diploma) Design Level 4 Certificate in Early Years Practice

Framework for Higher Education Qualification Levels (FHEQ)

ICM Diploma (Level 5 Diploma)

C (certificate) Certificates of higher education

Level 3 Certificate in Small Animal Care NVQ in Aeronautical Engineering A levels Level 2 Diploma for Beauty Specialists NVQ in Agricultural Crop Production GCSEs Grades A*-C Level 1 Certificate in Motor Vehicle Studies NVQ in Bakery GCSEs Grades D-G Entry – e.g. Entry Level Certificate in Adult Literacy

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6

Student Registration & Course/Level Entry Requirements

6.1 Student Registration In order to undertake any ICM examination candidates must be Registered ICM Student Members. Student Membership can be obtained by completing the appropriate Student Registration Application form and returning the form and the Student Registration Fee to the Institute. Details of Student Registration Fees can be found on the ICM website. The Student Registration fee is valid for one year and can be renewed annually. Important Note: All students wishing to register for any ICM Advanced Diploma programme or above, MUST complete and attach an Academic History form to their Student Registration form. Copies of all qualifications and Awards obtained by the student must also accompany the Academic History form. The Academic History form is used to ensure that students are qualified to commence their studies at the Level they have selected.

6.2 Student Registration Fees Student Registration fees for standard ICM Awards and programmes are based on the country in which you will undertake your examinations. The current fees levels are as follows: Group 1: If you are based in Europe, and EU Member State, North America, a Gulf State, India, the Middle East, Australasia, Singapore, South Africa, China, Hong Kong or Malaysia your Registration Fee will be £50.00 Pounds Sterling. Group 2: If you are based in sub-Saharan Africa, Central or South America, Pakistan, Bangladesh, the Caribbean or North Africa your Registration Fee will be £25.00 Pounds Sterling. Group 3: A special rate exists for students in countries which have (a) emerged from conflict (b) countries in which the general population is subject to great poverty and (c) countries in which the UN acknowledge that the level of economic activity and national per capita income is unacceptably low.

6.3

Course/Level Entry Requirements

ICM professional programmes are structured in ‘Levels’. These Levels are designed to provide a structured and progressive level of knowledge. All students are required to commence their studies at the Diploma Level of all programmes unless they are able to claim subject-for-subject or Level exemptions. Subject-for-subject exemptions can be applied for if the student has (a) been examined, in the subject, by another recognised Awarding body and (b) has passed the examination/s set by the alternate body.

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The Institute operates an 'Open Entry' policy in respect of most of its Diploma Level vocational programmes, subject to appropriate work experience, but prospective students should note that the following qualifications are recommended for those wishing to undertake ICM Diploma Level programmes:

Entry to an ICM Diploma Level Programme (NQF Level 5) Entry to an ICM Diploma programme requires completion of secondary education or equivalent. For example:  One GCE A-level plus three GCSEs (or equivalents) or 5 GCSEs  A suitable BTEC National Award  Any qualification equivalent to one or more of the above The minimum age for registration for the majority of programmes is 18. Applicants over the age of 20 who do not hold one of the recommended entry qualifications may also register for some Diploma Level programmes providing they have been in full-time employment for a minimum of two years and can produce a letter from their employer to confirm this.

Entry to an ICM Advanced Diploma Programme (NQF Level 6) Entry to an ICM Advanced Diploma programme requires completion of the ICM Diploma Level of the selected programme.

Entry to an ICM Graduate Diploma Programme (NQF Level 6) Entry to an ICM Graduate Diploma requires completion of the ICM Diploma and Advanced Diploma in the selected programme.

Entry to an ICM Post Graduate Diploma Programme (NQF Level 7) Registration for an ICM Post Graduate Diploma is accepted from those:  who have completed an ICM Graduate Diploma  who hold any Level 6 business or management Award  holders of business and management degree level qualifications Mature Candidates. Applications from those over the age of 25 who do not meet the standard Entry Requirements will also be considered providing they:  Are over the age of 25  Have been in employment for 5 years – a letter of support is required from the applicant’s employer; and  Hold a management or senior supervisory position

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7

Examinations and Results

7.1 Examinations In order to achieve a consistent global standard the Institute sets all examination papers and all candidate scripts are returned to the Institute for marking. Invigilation of examinations is undertaken either by external Invigilators who are appointed by the Institute or by the British Council. Examinations are held in March, June, September and December and the Examination Timetable can be found on the ICM website. Candidates must be registered and paid-up Student Members of the Institute at the time they undertake their examinations. Examination papers are securely distributed to ICM Approved Centres and scripts are assessed and moderated in the UK by ICM Appointed Examiners. Full details of Examination dates can be found on the ICM website.

7.2 Examination Entry Fees and Forms Examination Entry fees are shown on the appropriate Examination Entry form for the subject/programme you are undertaking. In general, the standard Examination fee is £26.00 Pounds Sterling per subject. There are however some specialist programmes where a higher subject fee may be payable. If you have any queries relating to fees please contact your Teaching Centre. In order to undertake any ICM Professional or Single Subject examination you must be a Registered and paid-up ICM Student Member. To enter for an examination you need to complete the relevant Examination Entry form and submit it to the Institute.

7.3 Examination Timetable ICM examinations take place four times each year, in March, June, September and December. The Timetable for each year states the Closing Date for receipt of entries for each examination Series. Please visit the website to view the ICM examination timetable.

7.4

Examination grades and re-marking

You can request that your examination script is re-marked if you are unhappy with your result. The fee for this is £35.00 Pounds Sterling per script. The Institute operates a triple marking and moderation system. In the event that the moderator increases the original marks awarded, the fee for re-marking your script will be refunded to you. Should the Grade awarded remain the same, you will be issued with a full Examiner’s Report detailing your examination performance. The Institute retains answer scripts for a maximum period of six months. Examination scripts/answer books are not returned to candidates under any circumstances.

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7.5

Examination re-sits

Although ICM Examinations are held every twelve weeks it should be noted that it takes an average of twelve weeks to mark the scripts after each Examination Series. If you sit, for example, for one or more subjects in March you will not receive your results until June. This means that if you were to fail a subject in March, you would not be able to resit the subject in June, as you will have missed the Closing Date for the June Series. Our advice is that you try to split your subject examinations between two consecutive Examination Series e.g. If your programme has four subjects you could take two subjects in one series and two in another series. On this basis, were you to fail one subject in March you would be able to re-sit it in September, giving you plenty of time for revision.

7.6

Examination Closing Dates

There is a Closing Date for receipt of Examination Entries and candidates entering for examinations must ensure that their completed Examination Entry forms and fees reach the Institute before the Closing Date for each Examination Series. Examination Timetables indicate the closing date for receipt of entries for each sitting and this information also appears on the ICM website. Entries received after the Closing Date are automatically carried forward to the next Examination Series. 7.7

Examination Results

Results are distributed within twelve weeks from receipt of scripts. Candidates are advised not to telephone the Institute for results as this information is confidential and cannot be disclosed over the telephone. 7.8

Examination Grades

Should you wish to re-sit any examination to improve your previous Grade, please note that the latest Grade you obtain will stand. 7.9

Transcript of Academic Results

You may request a transcript of your Academic Results, however please note there is a charge of £15.00 Pounds Sterling for each Award transcript requested. 7.10 Replacement Certificates Replacement certificates are available on payment of a fee of £20.00 Pounds Sterling per certificate. Please include your Student Registration Number together with your current postal address and indicate which certificate is required.

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7.11 Deferrals There is a fee of £15.00 Pounds Sterling per subject should you wish to defer your examinations to another Series for health or for any other reason. If you are unable to undertake your examinations, it is essential you advise ICM before the appropriate examination date, otherwise the full entry fee of £26.00 Pounds Sterling will be applicable. Please note that you may only defer examinations on one occasion. The full entry fee of £26.00 Pounds Sterling per subject will become due if you defer on more than one occasion. 7.12 Subject Exemptions for Professional Programmes Students holding relevant recognised qualifications from other professional bodies or recognised Higher Education institutions may apply for Subject Exemptions, on a subject-forsubject basis. It may also be possible, subject to qualifications held, to obtain exemption from a Level within a programme. Documentary evidence is required before any decision can be made in connection with the granting of Subject/Level Exemptions. No exemptions are given for case studies or assignments. Internally awarded school certificates and diplomas are not accepted for exemption purposes.

7.13 Single Subject Candidates Registered ICM students who do not want to complete a full ICM programme may study individual subjects. Single Subject candidates receive a Single Subject Diploma on successful completion of the relevant subject examination. Single Subjects qualify, on a subject-for-subject basis, for subject exemptions from ICM professional programmes. Note: 1. Case Studies, Assignments and Projects, including ALL subjects in any Post Graduate programme, do not qualify for Single Subject Awards. 2. A student who undertakes, on a Single Subject basis, subjects within a Diploma, Advanced Diploma, Graduate Diploma or Post Graduate ICM programme will not be entitled to a professional Award unless they are exempted from or have completed all lower Levels of that Award. 3. In order to comply with UKBA requirements, overseas students studying in the UK (excluding those from EU countries) are not permitted to undertake Single Subjects and must undertake a professional programme.

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Subject advice, educational guidance and student support

You are expected to be independent and to take responsibility for your own academic and personal life. However, your study centre should also provide appropriate help and assistance. Your tutors will direct your studies and ensure that you know what work you need to cover in any given unit. Seek advice from academic staff either during or after class or try to see them during their office hours.

8.1 Study Methods Teaching Centres are provided with a detailed syllabus and reading list for each subject area. Each Unit Syllabus clearly defines the areas that you will be required to cover for each subject and your examination questions will be based on the areas and topics detailed for

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each unit. It is important to ensure that you obtain a copy of each unit syllabus from your Teaching Centre. Alternatively, this information can be obtained online at www.icm.education, in the ‘Single Subject’ section. Each Unit Syllabus is normally linked to one main textbook and the examiners base their questions on the contents of the nominated core text. The Unit Syllabuses also give details of 'Alternative Texts' and texts recommended for further reading. It is advised that you should refer to the 'Alternative Texts' in order to develop your skills and broaden your knowledge of the subject area. 8.2 Payment Methods For our accepted methods of payment, please refer to the ICM website: www.icm.education

8.3 Choosing your course of study As an ICM Student Member you can work towards obtaining either a recognised Professional qualification or study for one or more of the 200 Single Subject Awards from the list of subjects offered by the Institute. The choice is yours. 8.4 ICM Approved Centres Tuition leading to the Institute’s examinations can only be provided by Institutions which have been granted ICM ‘Approved Centre’ status. Please note that some ICM Teaching Centres specialise in particular subject areas and not all ICM Centres will necessarily offer tuition for every ICM course programme. Visit the website to find an ICM Approved Centre near you.

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Textbooks

The recommended textbooks for each subject are shown on each subject syllabus. Examiners base their questions on the contents of the recommended texts and it is therefore important for you to ensure that you have access to the appropriate texts. You can obtain the full list of books available to purchase from ICM and/or place orders by either contacting your Centre or complete the Book Order Form and send it to ICM’s Book Sales Manager at: [email protected] .

10 Students with specific learning difficulties If you are diagnosed with a specific learning difficulty you may be granted special arrangements for your examination/s. We will require a copy of an Assessment Report issued within the last three years. The amount of additional time and any other arrangements will be determined on the basis of the Report relating to your circumstances. It is possible that you may be granted permission to use a computer or laptop without internet connection in your examinations.

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11 Copies of past examination papers and other forms of assessment The ICM website, www.icm.education, provides a database of recent examination papers, assignments and Case Studies. These can be found in the Student Resources section of the website. 12 Unit Information Covering all the major business and management areas and topics, the ICM Diploma and Advanced Diploma programmes have, over a fifteen year period, achieved international recognition and are currently undertaken by students in over 40 countries. 12.1 Programme Objectives To provide students with:  an understanding of the economic, legal and fiscal environments within which all businesses operate  a detailed knowledge of the supply, storage and purchasing functions  an understanding of the way in which business organisations are structured, managed and administered  numerate and analytical skills for purchasing, stores management and supply decision purposes 12.2 Recommended Course Duration To help calculate the duration of the programme, please refer to the section entitled ‘Student Work Load’ in section 4.2 of this handbook. It is expected that a student will need at least 18 months to 2 years of full-time study at an ICM Approved Centre to complete the full Advanced Diploma programme. 12.3 Examination Grades Grade A – Distinction Grade B – Credit Grade C – Pass Grade D – Pass Grade F – Fail

70% and above 60% to 69% 50% to 59% 40% to 49% 39% and under

Certification On successful completion of the first five units students are awarded the ICM Diploma in Purchasing & Supply Management, On successful completion of all 10 subjects students are awarded the ICM Advanced Diploma in Purchasing & Supply Management.

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12.4 Continuing Education The Purchasing & Supply Management programme will serve as an excellent route for students who ultimately seek full professional status and will provide first class underpinning knowledge for the UK degrees in Purchasing & Supply. Holders of an ICM Diploma in Purchasing & Supply Management may enter the ICM Advanced Diploma programme and completion of this may enable entry to the final year of appropriate Honours degree programmes subject to university requirements. 12.5 Entry Requirements Students holding relevant recognised qualifications from other institutions or professional examining bodies may apply for exemptions on a subject-for-subject basis. The Institute operates an 'Open Access' policy in respect of many of its vocational programmes but prospective students should note that the following entrance qualifications are recommended for those wishing to undertake the ICM Diploma programme:  One GCE A-level plus Three GCSEs (or equivalents)  A suitable BTEC National Award  Any qualification equivalent to one or more of the above The minimum age for registration for this programme is 18. Applicants over the age of 20 who do not hold one of the recommended entrance qualifications may also register for the programme providing they have been in relevant fulltime employment for a minimum of two years.

Advanced Diploma in Purchasing & Supply Management The minimum age for registration for this programme is 19. Students may obtain entry direct to the Advanced Diploma stage if they hold one or more of the following qualifications:  The ICM Diploma in Purchasing & Supply Management (or an equivalent level qualification)  A suitable BTEC National Award  Any Purchasing & Supply Management qualification equivalent to one of the above

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13 Course Structure

The Diploma in Purchasing & Supply Management 1. Customer Service 2. Negotiation 3. Quantitative Methods for Managers 4. Stores Management & Stock Control 5. Supply Chain Management The Diploma in Purchasing & Supply Management is awarded on completion of all five units

The Advanced Diploma in Purchasing & Supply Management 6. International Purchasing & Supply 7. Logistics 8. Operations Chain Management 9. Purchasing & Supply Law 10. Purchasing Strategies The Advanced Diploma in Purchasing & Supply Management is awarded on completion of all ten subjects

13.1 Unit Syllabuses Syllabuses for this programme are contained in the following sections.

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13.1.1 Customer Service Syllabus

Unit Title

Customer Service

Unit Code

CS-0616

Level

5 Diploma

Credits

20

Unit Leader

KE

Pre-requisites Main Aim(s) of the Unit: This unit provides students with the skills, techniques and knowledge required to deliver effective customer service. It provides an insight into the different types of customers likely to be encountered in a business and service environment, their particular characteristics to achieve a successful outcome. It places effective customer interaction within a strategic context by setting out the stages involved in the development of an effective customer service strategy and the leadership role required to bring this to effective fruition. Further, this unit provides students with an understanding of the measures, techniques and tools available to measure the health of customer service interactions and the indicators that an organisation may need to address its customer relationships. Main Topics of Study: Introduction What is Customer Service?

► ► ► ► ► ► ►

Importance of customer service

► ► ► ► ► ► ► ► ► ► ► ► ►

Elements of success

Understanding customer satisfaction Excellent customer service Five needs of every customer Internal and external customers Customer attributes

Cost of losing a customer Challenges and Solutions Challenges of Customer Service Barriers to excellent customer service Power of perceptions Understanding expectations Levels of expectations Scope of influence Reputation management Techniques for exceeding customer expectations Keys to credibility Importance of values Ethics in customer service Current status of customer service New trends in customer service

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Problem Solving

► ► ► ► ► ► ► ► ► ►

Role of problem solving in customer service

► ► ► ► ► ► ► ►

Why a strategy?

► ► ► ► ► ► ►

What is empowerment?

► ► ► ► ► ► ► ► ► ►

Building customer intelligence

Creativity and problem solving Problems as opportunities Confronting conflict Problem solving process Problem solving strategies Development of negotiation skills Professional approaches to apologising and conveying bad news Barriers to problem solving and decision making

Importance of follow up Management and Strategy Strategy for Formulating a Plan for Success Planning Importance of infrastructure Culture High touch and low touch customers Consumption behaviour Segmenting the market

Developing a strategy Empowerment Importance of mission and purpose statement Empowerment = opportunity Steps to empowering customer service providers Co-production of customer service Why co-production works

Design of systems Communications Communications in Customer Service Methods of communication Listening Voice inflection as a customer service tool Telephones and customer service Words to use/avoid Power phrases Power of eye contact Appeal to the senses Communication and technology

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Managing Difficult Customers Coping with Challenging Customers

► ► ► ► ► ► ► ► ►

Who are challenging customers?

► ► ► ► ► ► ► ► ►

What is motivation?

► ► ► ► ► ► ► ► ► ►

Leadership defined

► ► ► ► ► ► ► ► ► ► ►

What is customer retention?

Why they are challenging Creating challenging customers Characteristics of challenging customers Respect Empathy Responsibility check What to do when you are wrong

Benefits from dealing with challenging customers Motivation and Leadership Motivation Needs and wants Motivating factors Understanding morale Self-concept and motivation Improving self-concept Power of self motivation Teamwork

Motivating others Leadership in Customer Service Knowing yourself Formal and informal leaders Coach or counsellor Characteristics of excellent leaders Leadership and goals Creating a customer service culture Benefit of job aids Leadership without position

The boss as a customer Customer Retention and Measurement of Satisfaction Value of existing customers Churn Developing and improving the customer retention programme Measurement of satisfaction Sources of information Benefits of measuring your effectiveness Determining your effectiveness Surveys and reality Evaluating your own performance Business benefits from measuring satisfaction

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Technology and Customer Service

► ► ► ► ► ►

Today’s changing marketplace The customer of the twenty-first century Embracing new technologies Call centres The Internet

Enhancing service experiences and building customer loyalty Excellence in Customer Service

► Excellence as the goal ► Getting started ► Rewards of excellent customer service Learning Outcomes for the Unit: At the end of this Unit, students will be able to: 1.

Assess the impact on an organisation of a range of types of customer and evaluate techniques that can be adopted to identify, meet and exceed their needs.

2.

Evaluate the methods, techniques and measures to engage effectively with customers and to assess customer satisfaction with an organisation and its products.

3.

Assess the significance of effective leadership and management in creating the conditions for effective employee-customer interactions.

Learning and teaching methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: Learning takes place on a number of levels through lectures, class discussion including problem review and analysis. Formal lectures provide a foundation of information on which the student builds through directed learning and self managed learning outside of the class. The students are actively encouraged to form study groups to discuss course material which fosters a greater depth learning experience. Assessment methods which enable the student to demonstrate the learning outcomes for the Unit:

Weighting:

Examination: 3 hours duration

100%

Indicative Reading for this Unit: Main Text Customer Service: A Practical Approach, 6th edition, Elaine J. Harris, Prentice Hall. ISBN: 978-1292040356 Alternative Texts Managing Customer Service, Jenny Hayes & Frances Dredge, Gower Once a Customer, Always a Customer, Chris Daffy, Oak Tree Press

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Guideline for Teaching and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit): 50 hours

Lectures / Seminars / Tutorials / Workshops Tutorial support includes feedback on assignments and may vary by college according to local needs and wishes.

50 hours

Directed learning Advance reading and preparation/Class preparation/Background reading/Group study/Portfolio/Diary etc.

100 hours

Self managed learning Working through the course text and completing assignments as required will take up the bulk of the learning time. In addition students are expected to engage with the tutor and other students and to undertake further reading using the web and/or libraries.

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21

13.1.2 Negotiation Syllabus

Unit Title

Negotiation

Unit Code

N-0616

Level

5 Diploma

Credits

20

Unit Leader

KE

Pre-requisites Main Aim(s) of the Unit: This unit provides an understanding of negotiating concepts and techniques. It sets out a framework for how negotiators can plan and deliver negotiating strategies in national and international contexts. Main Topics of Study: The Nature of Negotiation

► ► ► ► ► ►

Characteristics of a negotiation situation

► ► ► ► ►

The distributive bargaining situation

Interdependence Mutual adjustment Value claiming and value creation Conflict

Effective conflict management Strategy and Tactics of Distributive Bargaining Tactical tasks Positions taken during negotiation Closing the deal

Hardball tactics Strategy and Tactics of Integrative Negotiation

► An overview of the integrative negotiation process ► Key steps in the integrative negotiation process ► Factors that facilitate successful integrative negotiation Negotiation: Strategy and Planning

► Goals ► Strategy versus tactics ► The planning process Ethics in Negotiation

► ► ► ► ►

Ethical quandaries The meaning of ethics and their importance in negotiation Why ethical conduct issues arise in negotiations Deceptive tactics – motives and consequences

Dealing with deception Perception, Cognition and Emotion

► Perception ► Framing

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► Cognitive biases in negotiation ► Managing misperceptions and cognitive biases in negotiation ► Mood, emotion and negotiation Communication

► ► ► ►

Communication during negotiation How people communicate in negotiation Improving communication in negotiation

Communication and closing negotiation Finding and Using Negotiation Power

► The importance of power ► The definition of power ► Dealing with others who have more power Relationships in Negotiation

► Negotiations in communal sharing relationships ► Key elements in managing negotiations within relationships Multiple Parties, Groups and Teams in Negotiations

► The nature of multiparty negotiations ► Managing multiparty negotiations International and Cross-Cultural Negotiations

► ► ► ► ►

How international negotiations differ Conceptualising culture and negotiation Managerial perspectives Research perspectives

Culturally responsive negotiation strategies Best Practices in Negotiation

► Approaches and techniques Learning Outcomes for the Unit: At the end of this Unit, students will be able to: 1.

Understand the dynamics of negotiations.

2.

Understand the distinguishing features and characteristics of negotiations.

3.

Understand the key strategies in business negotiations.

4.

Understand the key challenges likely to be encountered by international business negotiators.

5.

Understand the application of negotiating strategies in international regions.

Learning and teaching methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: Learning takes place on a number of levels through lectures, class discussion including problem review and analysis. Formal lectures provide a foundation of information on which the student builds through directed learning and self managed learning outside of the class. The students are actively encouraged to form study groups to discuss course material which fosters a greater depth learning experience. Assessment methods which enable the student to demonstrate the learning outcomes for the Unit:

Weighting:

Examination: 3 hours duration

100%

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Indicative Reading for this Unit: Main Text Essentials of Negotiation, 6th International edition, Roy J. Lewicki, Bruce Barry & David M. Saunders, McGraw-Hill. ISBN: 978-9814577274 Guideline for Teaching and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit): 50 hours

Lectures / Seminars / Tutorials / Workshops Tutorial support includes feedback on assignments and may vary by college according to local needs and wishes.

50 hours

Directed learning Advance reading and preparation / Class preparation / Background reading / Group study / Portfolio / Diary etc.

100 hours

Self managed learning Working through the course text and completing assignments as required will take up the bulk of the learning time. In addition students are expected to engage with the tutor and other students and to undertake further reading using the web and/or libraries.

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13.1.3 Quantitative Methods for Managers Syllabus

Unit Title

Quantitative Methods for Managers

Unit Code

QM-0605

Level

5 Diploma

Credits

20

Unit Leader

MR

Pre-requisites Main Aim(s) of the Unit: The aim of this unit is to help equip students with some of the quantitative analysis skills that are relevant to the study of Business as a whole and does so through three principle aspects of quantitative methods namely; finding and identifying appropriate information, analysing the information in appropriate ways and presenting the results to other people in helpful and attractive formats. Main Topics of Study: Data Presentation and Collection ► Frequency distribution ► Frequency tables ► Discrete or continuous data ► Histograms ► Frequency polygon ► Frequency curve ► Cumulative frequency curves ► Bar charts and pie charts ► Lorenz curve Central Location and Dispersion ► Notation ► Measures of central location ► Normal and skewed distribution ► Measures of dispersion ► Coefficient of variation Regression and Correlation ► Regression analysis ► Correlation ► Spearman’s coefficient of rank correlation ► Multiple regression Time Series and Forecasting ► Time series analysis ► Moving average ► Finding the trend

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► Finding and eliminating the seasonal variation ► Forecasting: time series ► Forecasting: exponential smoothing Probability ► Probability calculations ► Mutually exclusive events: OR rule ► Venn diagrams: events not mutually exclusive ► Independent events: AND rule ► Conditional probability ► Decision trees ► Expected value ► Permutations and combinations Probability Distributions ► Normal distribution ► Standard normal distribution ► Binomial distribution ► Poisson distribution Sampling and Tests of Hypotheses ► Types of sample ► Distribution of sample means ► Central limit theorem ► Confidence intervals ► Tests of hypotheses: principles ► Tests of hypotheses: practice ► Student distribution Index Numbers ► Constructing an index number ► Weighted aggregate index numbers ► The Laspeyres (base-weighted) price index ► The Paasche (current-weighted) price index ► The Laspeyres (base-weighted) quantity index ► The Paasche (current-weighted) quantity index ► Changing the base year ► Price and quantity relative index numbers ► The Retail Price Index (RPI) Time Value of Money ► Simple and compound interest ► Discounting and present value ► Investment appraisal ► Depreciation

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► Annuities and other financial instruments Linear Programming and Break-Even Analysis ► Linear programming ► Solving the linear programme: maximisation ► Solving the linear programme: minimisation ► Break-even analysis Calculus and Business Applications ► Differentiation ► Turning points ► Rules for differentiation ► Applications of differentiation ► Partial differentiation ► Integration Basic Mathematics ► Whole numbers, fractions and decimals ► Rounding-off ► Percentages and ratio ► Powers and roots ► Simple algebra ► Solving equations ► Simultaneous equations ► Inequalities ► Graphs and functions ► Progressions Learning Outcomes for the Unit: At the end of this Unit, students will be able to: 1.

Identify appropriate types of quantitative information and their sources.

2.

Rationalise and structure information and data.

3.

Analyse information in an appropriate method to extract all relevant trends, patterns and points of importance.

4.

Present results of analysis in an informative and attractive manner appropriate for clients, partners and business colleagues.

Learning and teaching methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: Learning takes place on a number of levels through lectures, class discussion including problem review and analysis. Formal lectures provide a foundation of information on which the student builds through directed learning and self managed learning outside of the class. The students are actively encouraged to form study groups to discuss course material which fosters a greater depth learning experience. Assessment methods which enable the student to demonstrate the learning outcomes for the Unit:

Weighting:

Examination: 3 hours duration

100%

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Indicative Reading for this Unit: Main Text Quantitative Methods for Business & Economics, 2nd edition, G. Burton, G. Carrol & S. Wall, Financial Times-Prentice Hall Alternative Texts and Further Reading Statistics for Marketing & Business, R. Galloway, Stanley Thornes A First Course in Statistics, D. Booth, DP Publications Guideline for Teaching and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit): 50 hours

Lectures / Seminars / Tutorials / Workshops Tutorial support includes feedback on assignments and may vary by college according to local needs and wishes.

50 hours

Directed learning Advance reading and preparation / Class preparation / Background reading / Group study / Portfolio / Diary etc.

100 hours

Self managed learning Working through the course text and completing assignments as required will take up the bulk of the learning time. In addition students are expected to engage with the tutor and other students and to undertake further reading using the web and/or libraries.

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13.1.4 Stores Management & Stock Control Syllabus

Unit Title

Stores Management & Stock Control

Unit Code

SMSC-0913

Level

5 Diploma

Credits

20

Unit Leader

KE

Pre-requisites Main Aim(s) of the Unit: This unit aims to provide students with a detailed knowledge of the supply, storage and purchasing functions. Main Topics of Study: The Supply Function ► Stores ► Responsibilities ► Organisation ► Position of stores within the purchasing and supply organisation ► Relationships with other departments ► Materials management ► Logistics ► The supply chain concept ► The British standard guide to stock control Identification of Materials ► Coding of materials ► Advantages of a coding system ► Code symbols ► Interpretation of codes ► Methods of coding ► Self-validating codes ► Organising a materials vocabulary ► Specification ► Bar coding ► Variety reductions ► Some widely used coding systems Receipt and Inspection ► Expediting ► Receipts from suppliers ► Transfers from other storehouses ► Returns from production or other departments ► Scrap arising

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► Inspection ► Vendor quality rating ► Marshalling receipts ► Receipt of capital items within the organisation Issue and Dispatch ► Authorisation of issues ► Identification of requirements ► Timing of issues ► Methods of issuing stores for internal use ► Dispatch of goods outside the organisation Records and Systems ► Purpose of stock records ► Manual systems ► Computerised systems ► Electronic data interchange ► Current developments Materials and Accounting ► The value of stores in stock ► Basis of material costing ► Methods of pricing material ► Arrangement of stores accounts ► Provisions ► Control of stock by value ► Budgetary control ► Annual audit Approach to the Provision of Materials ► Reasons for holding stock ► Dependent and independent demand ► Approaches taken in production organisations ► Differing stock control needs of construction, service and retail organisations ► The extent of stockholdings ► Ordering quantities ► Range ► Consignment stocktaking Stock Control Techniques ► Provisioning ► Approaches to control ► Visual approaches to control ► Programming deliveries ► Ordering quantities

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► ABC analysis classification of stock according to purpose ► Forecasting demand ► The use of probability in inventory control ► The setting of recorder levels ► The provision of safety stock ► Simulation ► Physical security ► Responsibility for stock ► Purpose of stocktaking ► Periodic stocktaking ► Continuous stocktaking ► Stocktaking procedure ► Treatment of discrepancies ► Obsolescence and redundancy ► Stock checking Storehouses and Stockyards ► New stores buildings ► Large central storehouses ► Storehouses serving one factory or operating unit ► Hiring of storage accommodation ► Stockyards ► Construction of stockyards ► Stockyard facilities ► Buildings and enclosures within the stockyard Stores Operations ► Security ► Knowledge of materials ► Prevention of deterioration ► Storehouse location systems ► Flow ► Departmental stores ► Work-in-progress stores ► Special storage facilities ► Centralisation of storage central stores ► The assessment of stores efficiency ► The measurement of stores efficiency ► Redundant stock Health and Safety ► European directives on health and safety at work ► Manual lifting

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► The control of substances hazardous to health regulations ► Mechanical lifting ► Fire precautions Storage Equipment ► Adjustable steel shelving ► Bins ► Pallets ► Racks ► Measuring equipment ► Ladders and steps ► Cleaning equipment ► General tools ► Live storage ► Automation of warehouse work Materials Handling ► Benefits of proper materials handling ► Manual handling ► Mechanical handling ► Assessment of handling problems for mechanisation ► Hand-operated equipment ► Power-driven equipment ► The relationship of materials handling to transport Procedures Manuals ► The need for procedure manuals ► Procedures ► Advantages and disadvantages of a manual ► Preparation of the manual ► Contents of the manual ► Publication and distribution ► Implementation of the manual ► Work study Learning Outcomes for the Unit: At the end of this Unit, students will be able to: 1.

Understand the issues in respect of the storage and supply of materials from elementary principles to sophisticated automated operations.

2.

Understand the storage and supply requirements of particular types of organisations.

3.

Explain the key procedures and physical processes of storage, handling and the movement of materials.

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Learning and teaching methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: Learning takes place on a number of levels through lectures, class discussion including problem review and analysis. Formal lectures provide a foundation of information on which the student builds through directed learning and self managed learning outside of the class. The students are actively encouraged to form study groups to discuss course material which fosters a greater depth learning experience. Assessment methods which enable the student to demonstrate the learning outcomes for the Unit:

Weighting:

Examination: 3 hours duration

100%

Indicative Reading for this Unit: Main Text Inbound Logistics Management: Storage & Supply of Materials for the Modern Supply Chain, B. Crocker, D. Jessop & A. Morrison, Pearson Guideline for Teaching and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit): 50 hours

Lectures / Seminars / Tutorials / Workshops Tutorial support includes feedback on assignments and may vary by college according to local needs and wishes.

50 hours

Directed learning Advance reading and preparation / Class preparation / Background reading / Group study / Portfolio / Diary etc.

100 hours

Self managed learning Working through the course text and completing assignments as required will take up the bulk of the learning time. In addition students are expected to engage with the tutor and other students and to undertake further reading using the web and/or libraries.

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13.1.5 Supply Chain Management Syllabus

Unit Title

Supply Chain Management

Unit Code

SCM-0913

Level

5 Diploma

Credits

20

Unit Leader

KE

Pre-requisites Main Aim(s) of the Unit: This unit aims to provide students with numerate and analytical skills for purchasing, stores management and supply decision purposes. Main Topics of Study: Core Concepts ► Information systems and supply chain management ► Inventory ► Supply chain relationships ► Challenges facing supply chain managers Role of Information Systems and Technology ► Importance of information in an integrated supply chain management environment ► Interorganisational information systems ► Information requirements determination for a supply chain 10lS ► Information technology applications for supply chain management Managing the Flow of Materials across the Supply Chain ► Understanding supply chains ► Reengineering supply chain logistics ► Importance of time ► Performance measurement Developing and Maintaining Supply Chain Relationship ► Conceptual model of alliance development ► Developing trusting relationships with partners in the supply chain ► Resolving conflicts in a supply chain relationship Future Challenges in Supply Chain Management ► Sharing risks in interorganisational relationships ► Managing the global supply chain ► Greening of the supply chain ► Design for supply chain management ► Intelligent information systems

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Learning Outcomes for the Unit: At the end of this Unit, students will be able to: 1.

Explain the importance of and challenges in developing supply chain networks and explain the benefits that they bring.

2.

Explain the key issues, processes and procedures with regard to the flow of material and information across a supply chain.

3.

Understand how information technology can enhance the flow of material within and across national boundaries.

Learning and teaching methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: Learning takes place on a number of levels through lectures, class discussion including problem review and analysis. Formal lectures provide a foundation of information on which the student builds through directed learning and self managed learning outside of the class. The students are actively encouraged to form study groups to discuss course material which fosters a greater depth learning experience. Assessment methods which enable the student to demonstrate the learning outcomes for the Unit:

Weighting:

Examination: 3 hours duration

100%

Indicative Reading for this Unit: Main Text Introduction to Chain Supply Management, R.B. Handfield & E.L. Nichols, Prentice Hall Guideline for Teaching and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit): 50 hours

Lectures / Seminars / Tutorials / Workshops Tutorial support includes feedback on assignments and may vary by college according to local needs and wishes.

50 hours

Directed learning Advance reading and preparation / Class preparation / Background reading / Group study / Portfolio / Diary etc.

100 hours

Self managed learning Working through the course text and completing assignments as required will take up the bulk of the learning time. In addition students are expected to engage with the tutor and other students and to undertake further reading using the web and/or libraries.

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13.1.6 International Purchasing & Supply Syllabus

Unit Title

International Purchasing & Supply

Unit Code

IPS-0913

Level

6 Diploma

Credits

20

Unit Leader

KE

Pre-requisites Main Aim(s) of the Unit: This unit aims to provide students with a detailed knowledge of the supply, storage and purchasing functions and the numerate and analytical skills for purchasing, stores management and supply decision purposes. Main Topics of Study: Rationale of International Purchasing ► Advantages and rationale of buying overseas ► Role of international purchasing in the supply chain ► Factors influencing international trade ► International trade overview and trends ► Overview of import regulations Market Research and Selection ► Determining product specification ► National and international standards of product specification ► International standardisation organisation ► Process of sourcing potential suppliers Overseas Culture and Market Environment ► Culture ► Cultural comparisons ► Market environment Buying Strategy and Planning ► International purchasing strategy and planning ► International purchasing planning ► International purchasing funding options ► Trading within international groups ► Commodity markets ► Industrial markets and foodstuffs Logistics and Globalisation ► Role of logistics ► Global logistics operators ► Factors contributing to the development of logistics

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Negotiating the Contract ► Product specification ► Product formulation ► National and international standards ► Sourcing of products ► Source location and evaluation ► Tendering ► Supplier audit ► Overseas market ► Digital trade revolution ► Negotiating skills ► Terms and conditions of the contract ► Quality procedures in an international context Import Finance ► Selection criteria ► UCP 500 documentary credits ► URC 522 documentary collection ► Open account ► Advance payment ► Bill of exchange ► Commercial and transport documents ► Counter trade ► Factoring ► Forfeiting ► International exchange rates Import Documentation ► Air waybill ► ATA carnet ► Bill of lading ► Certificate of origin ► Certificate of shipment ► Charter party ► CMR note ► Courier receipt ► Dangerous goods note ► Dock receipt ► Exchange permit ► Export invoice ► Export licensing ► Health certificate

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► Import licensing ► International convention concerning the carriage of goods by rail ► Letters of hypothecation ► Letters of indemnity ► Mates receipt ► Packing list ► Parcel post receipt ► Plant health certificate ► Pre-shipment inspection certificate ► Quality certificate ► Ship’s delivery order ► Veterinary and health certificate ► Weight certificate International Physical Distribution Strategy and Management ► International physical distribution strategy ► Decision making process ► Problem areas and possible solutions ► Logistics strategy ► Customs planning ► Multi-modalism ► Containerisation ► Air freight ► International road transport ► International rail transport ► Transport distribution analysis ► Freight rates ► Dangerous cargo ► International transport conventions ► Freight forwarders Learning Outcomes for the Unit: At the end of this Unit, students will be able to: 1.

Explain the rationale of a company seeking to buy from overseas.

2.

Explain the selection and negotiation processes involved in buying in an overseas market.

3.

Explain the importing/exporting methodology.

4.

Describe the methods for the distribution and payment of materials.

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Learning and teaching methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: Learning takes place on a number of levels through lectures, class discussion including problem review and analysis. Formal lectures provide a foundation of information on which the student builds through directed learning and self managed learning outside of the class. The students are actively encouraged to form study groups to discuss course material which fosters a greater depth learning experience. Assessment methods which enable the student to demonstrate the learning outcomes for the Unit:

Weighting:

Examination: 3 hours duration

100%

Indicative Reading for this Unit: Main Text International Purchasing & Management, A. Branch, Thomson Guideline for Teaching and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit): 50 hours

Lectures / Seminars / Tutorials / Workshops Tutorial support includes feedback on assignments and may vary by college according to local needs and wishes.

50 hours

Directed learning Advance reading and preparation / Class preparation / Background reading / Group study / Portfolio / Diary etc.

100 hours

Self managed learning Working through the course text and completing assignments as required will take up the bulk of the learning time. In addition students are expected to engage with the tutor and other students and to undertake further reading using the web and/or libraries.

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13.1.7 Logistics Syllabus

Unit Title

Logistics

Unit Code

L-0913

Level

6 Diploma

Credits

20

Unit Leader

KE

Pre-requisites Main Aim(s) of the Unit: This unit aims to provide students with the numerate and analytical skills for purchasing, stores management and supply decision purposes. Main Topics of Study: Logistics and the Supply Chain ► Definitions ► Structuring ► Material and information flow ► Competing through logistics ► Supply chain strategies Serving the Customer ► Customer service ► Customer service as a link between logistics and marketing ► Customer service and customer retention ► Setting customer service priorities Value and Logistics Costs ► Sources of value ► Representing logistics costs ► Activity-based costing ► Balanced measurement portfolio ► Supply chain operations reference model Managing Logistics Internationally ► Drivers and logistics implications of internationalisation ► Trend towards internationalisation ► Challenge of international logistics and location ► Organising for international logistics ► General tendencies Managing the Lead Time Frontier ► Role of time in competitive advantage ► P:D ratios and lead time gap ► Time-based mapping ► Managing timeliness in the logistics pipeline

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► Method for implementing time based practices Just-In-Time and Lean Thinking ► Just-in-time ► Lean thinking ► Vendor-managed inventory ► Quick response The Agile Supply Chain ► Market winners and qualifiers ► Agile practices Managing the Supply Chain ► Collaboration in the supply chain ► Efficient consumer response ► Collaborative planning ► Forecasting and replenishment ► Managing supply chain relationships ► Framework for managing the supply chain Partnerships in the Supply Chain ► Choosing the right partnership ► Partnerships in the supply chain ► Supply-based rationalisation ► Supplier networks ► Supplier development ► Implementing partnerships Logistics Future Challenge ► New supply chain environment ► Key management challenges ► Role of the Internet ► Implementation issues Learning Outcomes for the Unit: At the end of this Unit, students will be able to: 1.

Describe the contribution of logistics to competitiveness, customer service and the creation of value.

2.

Explain how logistics operations can be leveraged to support service and cost performance objectives.

3.

Explain supplier interfaces and the challenges involved in integrating supply networks.

4.

Discuss leading edge thinking on logistics.

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Learning and teaching methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: Learning should take place on a number of levels, principally through lectures, but centres should also encourage seminars, presentation and class discussion, including review and analysis of current issues. Formal lectures should provide a foundation of information on which the student builds through directed learning and self managed learning outside the class. Assessment methods which enable the student to demonstrate the learning outcomes for the Unit:

Weighting:

Examination: 3 hours duration

100%

Indicative Reading for this Unit: Main Text Logistics Management Strategy, A. Harrison & R. van Hoek, Prentice Hall Guideline for Teaching and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit): 50 hours

Lectures / Seminars / Tutorials / Workshops Tutorial support includes feedback on assignments and may vary by college according to local needs and wishes.

50 hours

Directed learning Advance reading and preparation / Class preparation / Background reading / Group study / Portfolio / Diary etc.

100 hours

Self managed learning Working through the course text and completing assignments as required will take up the bulk of the learning time. In addition students are expected to engage with the tutor and other students and to undertake further reading using the web and/or libraries.

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42

13.1.8 Operations Chain Management Syllabus

Unit Title

Operations Chain Management

Unit Code

OCM-0913

Level

6 Diploma

Credits

20

Unit Leader

KE

Pre-requisites Main Aim(s) of the Unit: This unit aims to provide students with an understanding of the way in which business organisations are structured, managed and administered. Main Topics of Study: What is Purchasing? ► Definition ► Organisational buyers ► Purchasing, profitability and added value ► The evolution of purchasing ► Purchasing and change ► The status of purchasing Purchasing Strategy ► Definition ► Levels of strategy ► The strategic planning process ► Purchasing strategy ► Environmental scanning ► Strategy formulation ► Strategy implementation ► Strategy evaluation and control ► Strategic options Purchasing Organisation ► Organisational design and structure ► Approaches to organisation structures ► Centralised purchasing ► Purchasing and its functional interfaces ► The internal organisation of purchasing departments ► Purchasing and supply in group undertakings ► Horizontal organisations ► Supply chain management

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► Materials management ► Logistics management ► The contribution of purchasing to supply chain management Purchasing Procedures ► Introduction ► Traditional purchasing procedures ► The inefficiencies of traditional procedures ► Legal aspects of ordering procedures ► The ‘battle of the forms’ ► Purchasing records ► Small orders ► Purchasing manuals Purchasing and IT ► Introduction ► Management Information Systems (MIS) ► Information Technology (IT) ► IT and competitive advantage ► Computer systems ► Computer operation ► A typical computerised purchasing application flowcharts ► Essential features of a computerised supplies system ► Some computer applications relevant to purchasing ► Some advantages of computerised purchasing ► Telecommunications and networks ► Electronic commerce ► Electronic data interchange ► Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT) ► Electronic mail ► Smart cards ► Bar coding ► Electronic catalogues ► Security and legal issues ► The impact of IT on purchasing and supply Human Resources in the Supply Chain ► Introduction ► Human resource planning ► Job analysis ► Recruitment and selection ► Performance appraisal ► Training and development

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► Purchasing and pay ► Motivation, communication and commitment ► Communication ► The management of change ► Teamwork and multinational ► Teams ► Management styles and leadership ► Strategic aspects of HRM applied to purchasing Specifying and Assuring the Quality of Suppliers ► Introduction ► What is quality? ► The importance of TQM ► The specification of quality ► Product and production design and re-design ► Specifications ► Standardisation ► Value analysis and engineering ► The implementation of quality ► Quality control and assurance ► Quality systems ► Independent quality assurance and certification ► Tools for quality and reliability ► Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) ► Quality circle and task teams ► The cost of quality ► Purchasing and quality Matching Supply with Demand ► Definitions ► Inventory classifications ► The aims of inventory management ► The right quantity ► Demand ► The economics of stock management ► ABC analysis ► Variety reduction ► Economic Order Quantities (EOQs) ► The quantity discount model ► Lead times ► Forecasting demand ► Fixed order and period review systems

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► Materials Requirements Planning (MRP) ► Distribution Requirement Planning (DRP) ► Just-In-Time purchasing (JIT) ► Optimised Production Technology (OPT) ► Lot sizing ► Safety ► Stocks and service levels ► Special inventory factors Sourcing ► Sourcing levels ► Sourcing information ► Analysis of market conditions ► Directives ► Sources of supply ► Suppliers assessment and appraisal ► Supplier performance rating ► The supplier base ► Make or buy strategies and tactics ► Outsourcing ► Outsourcing purchasing ► Tiering ► International sourcing ► Partnership sourcing ► Forming successful partnerships ► Reciprocal trade ► Countertrade ► Intra-company trading ► Subcontracting ► Local suppliers ► Small or large suppliers ► Sourcing decisions ► Factors in deciding where to buy Contrasting Approaches to Supply ► Introduction ► Industrial products ► Capital investment items ► Buying used equipment ► Evaluating capital investments ► Selecting suppliers of capital items ► Leasing

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► The buyer and capital investment purchases ► Production materials ► Raw materials ► Futures dealings ► Methods of commodity dealings ► Component parts and assemblies ► Production materials and bills of materials ► Consumables ► Construction supplies and bills of quantities ► Goods for resale in wholesaling and retailing Storing Supplies ► Storage and supplies ► Type, location and siting of storage facilities ► Storage and materials ► Handling equipment ► Assessment of storage requirements ► Stores layout ► Identification of stock items ► Surplus Controlling Prices and Costs ► Price ► The conditions for perfect competition ► Imperfect competition and monopoly ► UK competition legislation ► Price information ► Pricing agreements ► Variations to firm and cost ► Price agreements ► Price analysis ► Price variation and adjustment currency management ► Incoterms Support Tools ► Tendering ► Debriefing ► Post-Tender Negotiation (PTN) ► Forecasting techniques ► Techniques of investment appraisal ► Application of costing techniques ► Life cycle costing ► Target costing

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► Absorption costing ► Activity-Based Costing (ABC) and management ► Standard costing ► Budgets and budgetary control ► Learning curves ► Project management ► Scheduling ► Models and simulation approaches Negotiation ► Introduction ► Definitions ► Approaches to negotiation ► The content of negotiation ► What is an effective negotiation? ► Factors in negotiation ► The process of negotiation ► Pre-negotiation ► The actual negotiation ► Post-negotiation ► Global negotiation Purchasing Research, Performance and Ethics ► Purchasing research ► Purchasing performance and control ► The aims of performance measures ► The prevalence of purchasing performance measures ► Principles of performance measures ► Methods of evaluating purchasing performance ► Accounting approaches ► Comparative approaches ► The purchasing management audit approach ► Management By Objectives (MBO) ► Purchasing and fraud ► Whistleblowing ► Purchasing ethics

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Learning Outcomes for the Unit: At the end of this Unit, students will be able to: 1.

Explain the key features of purchasing strategy, purchasing organisation and purchasing procedures.

2.

Describe the issues and challenges in sourcing materials from suppliers and successfully completing purchases.

3.

Explain the tools, processes and systems available to support the flow of materials.

Learning and teaching methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: Learning takes place on a number of levels through lectures, class discussion including problem review and analysis. Formal lectures provide a foundation of information on which the student builds through directed learning and self managed learning outside of the class. The students are actively encouraged to form study groups to discuss course material which fosters a greater depth learning experience. Assessment methods which enable the student to demonstrate the learning outcomes for the Unit:

Weighting:

Examination: 3 hours duration

100%

Indicative Reading for this Unit: Main Text Purchasing & Supply Chain Management, C.K. Lysons, Prentice Hall Guideline for Teaching and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit): 50 hours

Lectures / Seminars / Tutorials / Workshops Tutorial support includes feedback on assignments and may vary by college according to local needs and wishes.

50 hours

Directed learning Advance reading and preparation / Class preparation / Background reading / Group study / Portfolio / Diary etc.

100 hours

Self managed learning Working through the course text and completing assignments as required will take up the bulk of the learning time. In addition students are expected to engage with the tutor and other students and to undertake further reading using the web and/or libraries.

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13.1.9 Purchasing & Supply Law Syllabus

Unit Title

Purchasing & Supply Law

Unit Code

PSL-0913

Level

6 Diploma

Credits

20

Unit Leader

KE

Pre-requisites Main Aim(s) of the Unit: This unit aims to provide students with an understanding of the economic, legal and fiscal environments within which all businesses operate. Main Topics of Study: Law of Contract Contract Formation ► Offer and acceptance ► Invitations to treat ► Status of tenders ► Consideration ► Intention to create legal relations ► Contractual capacity ► Privity of contract Contractual Terms and Formalities ► Formalities ► Terms of contract ► Express and implied terms ► Conditions, innominate terms and warranties Vitiating Factors ► Mistake ► Misrepresentation ► Duress and undue influence ► Illegality and invalidity Exclusion Clauses ► Common law control ► Statutory control ► Unfair contract terms ► Criminal control Termination and Remedies ► Performance ► Agreement

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► Frustration ► Breach ► Remedies Law of Agency ► Role of an agent ► Creation of an agency ► Authority ► Duties arising from agency ► Principal/agent relationship ► Principal/third party relationship ► Agency/third party relationship ► Termination of agency ► Commercial agents Supply of Goods and Services Implied Conditions ► Contract of sale ► Right to sell ► Sale by description ► Satisfactory quality ► Fitness for purpose ► Sale by sample ► Acceptance ► Modification of remedies ► Exclusion of liability Supply of Goods and Services ► Implied conditions ► Implied conditions in services Delivery and Payment ► Delivery and payment ► Remedies Passage of Title and Risk ► Specific, ascertained and unascertained goods ► Passage of title ► Passage of risk ► Sale by a non-owner Law of Tort Negligence ► Duty of care ► Causation ► Defences ► Recoverable damage

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► Negligent mis-statement ► Vicarious liability Product Liability ► American experience ► Consumer protection legislation Consumer Protection Criminal Liability for False Statements ► Trade descriptions legislation ► Prices ► Property mis-descriptions Product Safety ► General product safety regulations ► Consumer protection legislation ► Health and safety ► Legislation Food Safety ► Food ► Sale and commercial operations ► Food safety offences ► Notices and orders ► Consumer protection ► Regulation ► Codes of practice ► Defences ► Enforcement Weights and Measures ► Offences of short weight or measure ► Regulated packages Related Legislation Legal Aspects of Outsourcing ► Tenders ► Letters of intent and comfort ► Procurement directives ► Compulsory competitive tendering ► Transfer of undertakings Competition Law ► Competition acts ► Fair trading legislation Intellectual Property ► Breach of confidence and passing off ► Patents

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► Copyright ► Designs ► Trade marks International Trade ► Bills of lading ► CIF and FOB contracts ► Documentary credits Insurance ► Types of insurance ► Insurable interest ► The contract ► Role of agents ► Claims ► Subrogation Learning Outcomes for the Unit: At the end of this Unit, students will be able to: 1.

Understand basic rights affecting the sale of goods.

2.

Explain the key legal provisions, processes and case law with regard to contract formation, content and termination; the supply of and payment for goods and agency relationships.

3.

Understand the relationship between civil and criminal law in respect of the sale of goods.

Learning and teaching methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: Learning takes place on a number of levels through lectures, class discussion including problem review and analysis. Formal lectures provide a foundation of information on which the student builds through directed learning and self managed learning outside of the class. The students are actively encouraged to form study groups to discuss course material which fosters a greater depth learning experience. Assessment methods which enable the student to demonstrate the learning outcomes for the Unit:

Weighting:

Examination: 3 hours duration

100%

Indicative Reading for this Unit: Main Text Law for Purchasing and Supply, M. Griffiths & I. Griffiths, Prentice Hall Project Management, Denis Lock, Gower

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Guideline for Teaching and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit): 50 hours

Lectures / Seminars / Tutorials / Workshops Tutorial support includes feedback on assignments and may vary by college according to local needs and wishes.

50 hours

Directed learning Advance reading and preparation / Class preparation / Background reading / Group study / Portfolio / Diary etc.

100 hours

Self managed learning Working through the course text and completing assignments as required will take up the bulk of the learning time. In addition students are expected to engage with the tutor and other students and to undertake further reading using the web and/or libraries.

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13.1.10 Purchasing Strategies Syllabus

Unit Title

Purchasing Strategies

Unit Code

PS-0913

Level

6 Diploma

Credits

20

Unit Leader

KE

Pre-requisites Main Aim(s) of the Unit: This unit aims to provide students with a detailed knowledge of the supply, storage and purchasing functions. Main Topics of Study: Purchasing ► Purchasing defined ► Scope of purchasing ► Creating profit in a business ► Processes examined ► Place of purchasing ► Financial impact of functions ► Purchasing as a strategic process ► Purchasing strategy and strategic purchasing Building a Purchasing Strategy ► Contribution and influence ► Purchasing and audit framework ► Organisation ► Relationships ► Systems ► Staffing and training ► Enabling foundation Strategic Purchasing – Understanding and Influencing the Supply Market ► Current problems ► Upstream and downstream management ► Supply planning ► Special requirements identification ► Contract strategy ► Supplier selection ► Contract finalisation Understanding the Basics of Purchasing ► Anyone can buy

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► Price and cost ► Price and volume ► Buyer power increases with size of organisation ► Price lists ► Competitive bidding ► Negotiation and service/quality ► Sealed bidding and security ► Multiple sourcing ► Price formulae ► Buyer power and monopoly ► Payment Supply Positioning ► Pareto analysis ► Setting up a supply positioning analysis ► Supply-market segmentation ► Purchasing goals ► Purchasing action scenarios ► Other applications ► Conglomerates’ purchasing Supplier Preferences ► Key account management ► Customer segmentation by suppliers ► Matching supply positioning with customer segmentation Vulnerability Management ► Identifying vulnerabilities ► Assessing the risk ► Managing the risk ► Vulnerability analysis ► Cost reduction ► Other issues Influencing the Supply Market ► Procurement marketing ► Reverse marketing ► Affirmative vendor improvement Buyer-Supplier Interface ► Specific requirements identification ► Getting early involvement ► Supplier-buyer conditioning ► Conditioning the buyer

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► Keeping the seller selling ► Conditioning the seller Options for Supplier Relationships ► Make v buy ► Market analysis ► Supplier relationships ► Changes in supply market ► Buyers response to changing market ► Dependency dilemma ► Supply market orientated role for purchasing ► Assessing competitive advantage Partnership Sourcing ► Definition ► Why develop partnership sourcing? ► Declared partnership goals ► Key issues Monopolies and Cartels ► Monopolies ► Determining the extent of the supply monopoly ► Strategies to redress the balance ► Cartels Organising for Impact ► Parkin wheel ► External environment ► Role ► Relationships ► Systems and structures ► Resources Measurement, Audit and Benchmarking ► Why measure? ► Operational or strategic ► Use of indicators ► Overall indicators ► Indicators related to supply positioning ► Limitations of indicators ► Management by objectives ► Measurement summary ► Benchmarking

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Learning Outcomes for the Unit: At the end of this Unit, students will be able to: 1.

Describe what a purchasing strategy is and understand how to combine strategy with practical application in respect of purchasing.

2.

Explain the processes underpinning decisions in respect of who should buy and how to buy for both the long and short term.

3.

Understand key issues, such as the market environment, competition, managing vulnerability and relationship building with regard to the buyer-supplier interface.

Learning and teaching methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: Learning should take place on a number of levels, principally through lectures, but centres should also encourage seminars, presentation and class discussion, including review and analysis of current issues. Formal lectures should provide a foundation of information on which the student builds through directed learning and self managed learning outside the class. Assessment methods which enable the student to demonstrate the learning outcomes for the Unit:

Weighting:

Examination: 3 hours duration

100%

Indicative Reading for this Unit: Main Text Profitable Purchasing Strategies, Steele & Court, McGraw Hill Guideline for Teaching and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit): 50 hours

Lectures / Seminars / Tutorials / Workshops Tutorial support includes feedback on assignments and may vary by college according to local needs and wishes.

50 hours

Directed learning Advance reading and preparation / Class preparation / Background reading / Group study / Portfolio / Diary etc.

100 hours

Self managed learning Working through the course text and completing assignments as required will take up the bulk of the learning time. In addition students are expected to engage with the tutor and other students and to undertake further reading using the web and/or libraries.

Purchasing & Supply Management

58

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