School Improvement Plan Report - Stewart County Schools

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Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Stewart County High School PO Box 422 Dover, TN 37058

School Improvement Plan

Original Document Created 2006-07 Data Updated November 2011

Mr. Mike Craig, Principal Ms. Jacquelyn Perigen, Vice-Principal

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Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Table of Contents COMPONENT 1 School Profile and Collaborative Process…………..………………….7 1.1 SIP Leadership Team Composition……………………………………………….…….7 1.2 Subcommittee Formation and Operation………………………………………….……7 1.3 Collection of Demographic Data and Analysis………………………………………..13

COMPONENT 2 Beliefs, Mission and Vision………………………………………………31 2.1 Collaborative Process …………………………………………………………….…….32 2.2 Clarity of Belief Statements ……………………………………………………….……34 2.3 Comprehensive Belief Statements ………………………………………………….…34 2.4 Clarity of Mission Statement/Focus on Student Success ……………………….….35 2.5 Clarity of Vision/Focus on School Success ……………………………………….….35

COMPONENT 3 Academic and Non-Academic Data Analysis ………………………...36 3.1 Variety of Academic and Non-Academic Assessment Measures …………….……37 3.2 Data Collection & Analysis ……………………………………………………….…….41 3.3 Report Card Data Disaggregation ………………………………...……48,63,70,74,77 3.4 Narrative Synthesis of All Data …………………………………….………………39,83 3.5 Prioritized List of Targets…………………………………………..……………………84

COMPONENT 4 Curricular, Instructional, Assessment and Organizational Effectiveness …………………………………………………………….…85 4.1 Collaboration ……………………………………………………………………..………88 4.2 Evaluation of the Decision-making Process …………………………………..……...91 4.3 Resource Allocation …………………………………………………………….….……92 4.4 Curriculum Analysis and Support ………………………………………………..…….97 4.5 Instructional Analysis and Support ……………………………………………..……...99

COMPONENT 5 Action Plan Development ………………………………………….……105 5.1 Goals Improving ACT…………………………………………………………….….…….107 Improving Writing………………………………………………………….….……116 Improving Value-Added Gains on Gateways…………………….……….…….119 5.2 Action Steps Improving ACT………………………………………………………………….….108 Improving Writing……………………………………………………………..……117 Improving Value-Added Gains on Gateways…………………………….….….120 5.3 Implementation Plan Improving ACT………………………………………………………………….….108 Improving Writing……………………………………………………………..……117 Improving Value-Added Gains on Gateways………………………………..….120

COMPONENT 6 The School Improvement Plan and Process Evaluation …………...123 6.1 Formative Assessment …………………………………………………………………124 6.2 Summative Assessment …………………………………………………………….….130 6.3 Evaluation of the SIP Process …………………………………………………………134

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Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Stewart County High School Faculty 2011-2012 Mr. Mike Craig Principal

Ms. Jacquelyn Perigen Vice Principal

Ms. Janey Marshall Ms. Loretta Craig Guidance Counselor

Faculty Christina Anderson Chris Austin Connie Baggett Kim Berry Lora Black Philip Bossenberger Brian Bramlett Nancy Cason Kent Cavallini Katie Cherry Jenny Cook Janie Cunningham Ben Duncan Barry Elliott Megan Fitzhugh David Genz Rebecca Grasty Anita Gray George Gray Gilbert Harper Dusty Holder Myles Holliday Chuck Holt Marcia Joiner

Mary Lambert Billy Lee Jill Lyons Julia Mallory Kelly McCoy Mendy McNulty Nancy Myers Jeanne Nolen Nicole Parker Penny Parsons Dabney Peacher Allen Ralls David Ross Kathy Smith Susan Smith Shawn Suiter Joe Tanner Jacqueline Wallace Catherine Watson Chelsea Wooten Cheryl Wooten

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Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

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Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Advisory Council Each vocational department is required to have a body of community people to provide input to the school about business and industry. This group meets several times a year as an entire group and with individual departments.

Agriculture

Cosmetology

Joe Griffey, Ag. Extension Agent Steve Morgan, West Vaco James Andrews, Farm Owner, Industry Charlie Hancock, Farmer/Farm Bureau Penny Parsons, Farm Owner, Tech Ed. Judy Lemons, Farm Owner, Forestry Michael Morgan, Farm Owner, Landscaper

Linda Hicklen, CEMC Crystal Wheatley, Cutting Edge Jamie Brake, Cosmetologist Mary Jewel Selph, Salon Owner Kimberly Berry,Salon/cosmotologist

Building Trades

Automotive Technology

Andy Brigham, Brigham Hardware Michael Barrett, Builder

Billy Williams, Dover Auto Parts Grant Redmon, Business Owner Randall Redmon, NW Voc. Center

Business

Health Occupations

Jim Myers, Sills Insurance Bryan Watson, F&M Bank Ian Smith, TVA Jane Bagwell, Work Force Essentials

Debbie Holland, RN Gateway Greg Barrow, EMS Jim Butkiewicz, Butkiewicz Fd. Jennifer Cook, Science Teacher Elaine Jackson, Coord. Health

Wheels of Learning

Family & Consumer Science

David Phillips, Contractor Terry Moore, TVA Steven Ford, Contractor

Nadia Brigham, Hosing Specialist Connie Peacher, FCS Degree Tammy Sills, Daycare Owner

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Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Stewart County Board of Education Dr. Phillip Wallace Director of Schools Mr. Billy Sexton, Chairman 137 Williams Road Big Rock, TN 37023 Mr. Kenny Collins PO Box 703 Dover, TN 37058 Mrs. Lesa Fitzhugh P.O. Box 471 Dover, TN 37058 Mr. Darrell Gillum 180 Gillum Hollow Road Indian Mound, TN 37079 Mr. Billy Gray 583 Old Hwy 79 Dover, TN 37058 Mr. Bobby Morgan 615 Link Road Dover, TN 37058 Mrs. Lana Sanders 139 Down Road Cumberland City, TN 37050

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Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

SACS Peer Review Visiting Team March 2001 for The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Dr. Kay Awalt-Musgrove Facilitator Mr. Stan Baskin Chairman

Committee Members Mr. Mark Beale Mrs. Evelyn Martinez Mr. Shane Smith Mr. Richard Rawlings

Committee Recommendation The review team found Stewart County High School to be an exceptional school with dedicated and caring staff and students. The community is justifiably proud of their efforts. Consequently, the review team recommended that Stewart County High School continue its accreditation by the Commission on Secondary and Middle Schools of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. A summary of the team’s report is included in Section 1-The School and Community Profile.

Next SACS review tentatively scheduled for Fall of 2006

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Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

(1.1 & 1.2) SCHS School Improvement Component Committees Verifying Information Leadership Team and Subcommittee Formation Chairs Mr. Chris Guynn, Principal Lora Black, Library Media Specialist

Additional Leadership Team Members Angie Saunders, Section 1 Chair Cheryl Wooten, Section 2 Chair Janey Marshall, Section 3 Chair Anita Gray, Section 4 Chair Penny Parsons, Section 5 Chair Ian Smith, Community Member/parent Charlene Miller, Support Staff Katie Black, Student Jim Myers, Parent Each section committee, as well as the steering committee, met as required to move through the planning process. The minutes of these meetings and supporting documentation of each committees’ work is on file in the library. To further verify this, each committee chair has signed below certifying this filing and the process.

TSIP Chair Signatures

Section 1: Community Profile Chairman Angie Saunders, Science

Faculty Members Christina Anderson, English Linda Baskins, Family and Consumer Science (Removed 2007-08) Brian Bramlett, Wellness Barry Elliott, Agriculture Billy Lee, English Craig Gallivan, Trades (Removed 2007-08) Kathy Smith, English

Community Members Jane Bagwell, North TN Private Industry Council Subcommittees for Component 1 have met and minutes are on file. __yes __no _______________________________________________________________ Component 1 Chairperson Signature

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Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Section 2: Beliefs & Mission Chairman Jacquelyn Perigen, Math

Faculty Members Kent Cavalinni, Social Studies Jenny Cook, Science Nancy Myers, Family & Consumer Science Larry Riddick, Language Elizabeth Shepherd, Music (Removed 2007-08) Dabney Peacher, Art Cheryl Wooten, Health Occupations

Parents Anna Asselta Albert Hargis Kim Hargis Melissa Parker Teresa Westerman Jim Myers Community Members Melissa Cavalinni, Albert Hargis, F & M Bank Students Caitlin Asselta Subcommittees for Component 2 have met and minutes are on file. __yes __no

________________________________________________________________ Component 2 Chairperson Signature

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Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Section 3: Academic and Non-Academic Data Analysis Chairman Janey Marshall, Guidance Faculty Members Jamie Baggett, CDC (Removed 2007-08) Nancy Cason, English Connie Evans, Special Ed Myles Holliday, Social Studies Mary Lambert, Business Education Sue Link, Special Ed Ted Newberry, Construction Nicole Parker, Math Kristee Smith, English Joe Tanner, Special Education Katherine Watson, Science

Subcommittees for Component 3 have met and minutes are on file. __yes __no

________________________________________________________________ Component 3 Chairperson Signature

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Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Section 4: Instructional and Organizational Effectiveness Chairman Anita Gray, Science Members Connie Baggett, Information Technology Kent Cavalinni, Social Studies Mike Craig, Vice-Principal 2007-08 Marcia Joiner, Math Steve Nolen, Vice-Principal (Removed 2007-08) Denise Peppard, School Nurse (Removed 2007-08) Community Members Steven Ford, Vocational Advisory Terry Moore, Vocational Advisory David Phillips, Vocational Advisory Bryan Watson, F&M Bank President Ian Smith, TVA Law Enforcement Jim Myers, Vocational Advisory, Sills Insurance Debbie Holland, RN Vocational Advisory, Gateway Medical Greg Barrow, Vocational Advisory, Paramedics/EMS Director Jim Butkiewicz, Vocational Advisory. Butkiewicz Foundation Robin Clark, Vocational Advisory, Dover Elementary Science Teacher Elaine Jackson, Vocational Advisory, Coordinated School Health Students and Recent SCHS Graduates Ashley Hargis, Austin Peay State University Ashlea Dollar, Austin Peay State University Whitni Earhart, Austin Peay State University Kyle Copeland, University of Tennessee at Martin Brittany Boyer, David Lipscomb University Joe Shannon, Covington Seminary School Other School System Personnel Sally Matthew, Bookkeeper Jamie Bogard, Payroll Francis Carson, Vocational Supervisor Subcommittees for Component 4 have met and minutes are on file. __yes __no ________________________________________________________________ Component 4 Chairperson Signature 11

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Section 5: Development of the Plan Chairman Penny Parsons, Math Faculty Members Paul Berry, Cosmetology Loretta Craig, Guidance Mike Craig, Vice Principal 2007-08 Becky Grasty, Math Chris Guynn, Principal Rita Hargis, English Susan Smith, Special Ed

Subcommittees for Component 5 have met and minutes are on file. __yes __no

________________________________________________________________ Component 5 Chairperson Signature Section 6: Implementing and Evaluating the Plan Chairman Lora Black, Library Media Specialist Faculty Members Angie Saunders, Section 1 Chair Jacquelyn Perigen, Section 2 Chair Janey Marshall, Section 3 Chair Anita Gray, Section 4 Chair Penny Parsons, Section 5 Chair Chris Guynn, Principal Charlene Miller, Support Staff

Subcommittees for Component 6 have met and minutes are on file. __yes __no

________________________________________________________________ Component 6 Chairperson Signature 12

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Section 1 Development of School Profile

Chairman Angie Saunders, Science Members Christina Anderson, English Linda Baskins, Family & Consumer Science (Removed 2007-08) Brian Bramlett, Wellness Barry Elliott, Agriculture Billy Lee, English Craig Gallivan, Trades (Removed 2007-08) Kathy Smith, English

Parents/Community Members Jane Bagwell, North Tennessee Private Industry Council

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Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Section 1: Development of Student/Community Profile (1.3) SCHOOL CHARACTERISTICS Historical Background The first class of graduating seniors in Stewart County received their diplomas in 1921, having attended Dover High School, a two-story frame structure with grades one through eight on the ground floor and grades nine through twelve on the second level. The total number of graduates was four. Enrollment grew steadily over the next three decades as the need for a larger facility became increasingly apparent. A much larger and more modern facility was constructed and opened in 1949 under a new name. In the following spring, sixty-one seniors graduated from Stewart County High School. In 1962 a band room was added to the existing facility and music was added to the curriculum. Two years later, the school became a member of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools and over the next decade, added vocational classes to the curriculum. During the 1978-79 school year, a $950,000 remodeling project added ten new classrooms with the construction of Wing B. The old wing received a face lift, and new facilities were built for Vocational Agriculture, Auto Mechanics and Building Trades. In the 1983-84 school year, Stewart County High School was nominated by the Tennessee Department of Education as one of the five most effective high schools in the State. In the following year, Stewart County High School was again accredited by the Southern Association. In 1986 Spanish was added to the curriculum, and a full time art teacher was hired in 1992. In 1997 Health Occupations was added, and in 1998 Wheels of Learning was included in the Building Trades curriculum. French was added to the foreign language curriculum in the fall of 2002. With the opening of the new Dover Elementary School in 1997, a few of the teachers from SCHS moved into classrooms in the old elementary facility which was soon dubbed the SCHS Annex. A shuttle bus system for moving students from campus to campus was implemented and worked quite effectively. By the beginning of the 1999 school year, all the classrooms in the old school were full with two classes held in portables. Fortunately, construction on a new facility was underway by the fall of 1999. 14

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Facilities In August of 2001, Stewart County High School moved to its new location northeast of Dover on Highway 79. This 15.2 million dollar complex has an 800student capacity with a core plant that could serve as many as 1000 students. A voluminous building of 176,000 square feet includes a 1700-seat gymnasium, a 300-seat state-of-the-art cafeteria, roomy library, and 50 classrooms. A separate vocational building houses classroom and shop areas for five of the vocational programs. At the opening of the new building, the football field was not complete and the band and sports program had to make arrangements to shuttle between the new and previous facility. In the fall of 2004, the football field was completed, along with a field house and concession stand.

Environmental and Safety Conditions We currently hold the status of being a “safe” school according to information from the 2006 school report card. A survey of parents was conducted in the fall of 2005. Of those polled, 33% felt the school was very safe, 43% felt is was safe, and 2% felt is was not safe. Drugs, alcohol, and bullying were reported as the top concerns. During this time the school system employed one School Resource Officer that was shared by all the schools in the district. In the Fall of 2003, SCHS added a county wide safety team that consisted of the following individuals: support staff members, Director of the CSHP, bus drivers, teacher assistants, teachers, principals and the maintenance department. The Bridges program, an anger management class for students, was started in the Fall of 2005. In March of 2005, our system experienced a school bus shooting by a high school student which resulted in the death of the driver/high school special education assistant. In response to this crisis, several counseling programs and crisis intervention programs were made available to those in need. The system received a $50,000 grant to provide several levels of services. Follow up counseling has also been ongoing since the incident. In the spring of 2006, the CSHP applied for a grant to provide funds to the SRO program. In the fall of 2006, the grant was approved and provided the school system with $163,000, which added two SRO’s and left additional money for extended counseling services.

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Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Grade Distribution, School Year, and School Day Information Stewart County High School currently serves grades 9-12. For over 25 years, two K-8 feeder schools served as the primer for entering students. In the fall of 2006 these schools combined creating one feeder school. Each year a committee of representatives from each school recommends a calendar to the BOE with consideration for learning needs. School typically begins in early August to accommodate ending the high school’s first semester by winter break and usually ends by the 3rd week in May. The calendar consists of 200 paid teacher days. Of these, there are 178 instructional days, 5 staff development days, 5 discretionary days (2 of which are parent/teacher conference days), and 10 paid holidays. SCHS is on a regular 4-block schedule. Each class meets for 90 minutes each day and credit is earned in one semester. There is a 20-minute advisory period each day. The school day begins at 7:45 and ends at 2:45. The school day is 30 minutes longer than required by the state and garners the system 13 stockpile days. Two are used for professional days and 11 for inclement weather days. In the past five years, the school has not had the need to amend the schedule significantly to accommodate “make-up” weather days.

Pupil Expenditures The per pupil expenditure per ADA is $6,884.00. This is $482 less than the state average and $2218 less than the national average. Additional budget information is included in section 4.

Staff Characteristics The Stewart County High School faculty and administration is comprised of 46 individuals. The faculty is comprised of 41 classroom teachers, one librarian, and two guidance counselors. The administration is composed of one vice-principal, and one principal. The male/female ratio is currently 33% male and 67% female. Only one ethnicity (white) is represented on the faculty. Each faculty member and administrator is dedicated to the education of the students and the on-going education of themselves for the betterment of our school and our school system. Of the faculty and administration, six individuals have a Master’s + 45 degree, 4 individuals have a Master’s + 15 degree, 13 individuals have a Master’s degree, 2 individuals have a Bachelor’s + 15 degree, and 14 individuals maintain a Bachelor’s degree, and 1 individual has an EDS. The percentage of faculty and administration with advanced degrees has increased from 23% in 1998 to a current 59%. The Stewart County faculty and administration continues to meet the State Goals 2000 standards in several areas. The years of experience of the Stewart County High School faculty and administration varies widely, which helps to provide a base for shared knowledge 16

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

and experience. Only 11% of the faculty has less than 5 years of teaching experience, while 33% have more than 15 years of experience. The majority (55%) of teachers have between 5 and 15 years of experience.

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Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Curriculum Offerings English I Advanced English I+ English II Advanced English II+ English III Advanced English III+ College English II Advanced English IV+ Advanced English IV/College English+ Applied Communications / English IV Journalism I Journalism II Speech Basic English I – II Basic English III – IV Spanish I Spanish II Latin / College Online French I French II + French III Humanities Transitional English I Transitional English II Algebra I Algebra I+ / Honors Algebra II Algebra II+ / Honors Geometry Calculus+ Math Technology I Math Technology II Pre-Calculus+ Foundations I Foundations II Gateway Algebra Fundamental Math I Fundamental Math II Physical Science Biology I Biology II+ Principles of Technology I Chemistry I+ Chemistry II+ Physics+ Science Skills

Physical Ed I – Boys Physical Ed I – Football Physical Ed I – Girls Lifetime Wellness Basic Wellness World History United States History United States Government World Geography Basic Geography Basic United States History / Government / Economics Economics Contemporary Issues Contemporary Issues - College Psychology Psychology – College Visual Art I Visual Art II Visual Art III Theater Arts (Drama) General Music Music History Instrumental Music (Concert) Instrumental Music (Flags) Instrumental Music (March) Keyboarding Document Creation Design Desktop Publishing Internet Multi Design E Commerce / Web Design+ Spreadsheet Application International Finance (Bookstore) International Finance (Bookstore) Quarterly Automated Accounting Accounting I+ Accounting II+ Agriculture Mechanics Fundamentals of Agriculture Forestry Wildlife Management Agricultural Engineering Interior/Exterior Landscaping Principles of Cosmetology Design Principles of Cosmetology

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Chemistry of Cosmetology Cosmetology II / III Forensic Science Forensic Audit Rehabilitation Therapy Health Science Education Anatomy and Physiology Emergency Medical Services Adult Living Child Development Family and Consumer Science Family and Parent Education Housing and Interior Design Interpersonal Communication Nutrition and Foods Textiles and Apparel Early Childhood Career Connections Success Career Management Success Transportation Core Coll Rep Technician Brake Systems Engine Performance Suspension Systems Heavy Equipment Construction Core Carpentry I Electrical I Metal Technician Office Aid Advisory Period Comp Dev Class ACT Prep

+ denotes honors/ advanced classes

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Other Program Offerings Stewart County High School offers a vast number of special activities and organizations which afford almost every student the opportunity to pursue his or her unique interests. While not all of these programs fit the letter of definition of academics, all of the programs are structured to meet the special needs of our students and provide them avenues of growth in many areas. The school has a full time athletic program that offers varsity football, varsity basketball for boys and girls, baseball, softball, junior varsity football, junior varsity basketball for boys and girls, boys and girls golf, and cheerleading. Stewart County High School also has a full time music director who offers instruction in music, marching band, individual tutoring in the various disciplines, stage band and other areas such as music history and general music. The marching band participates in a number of competitions throughout the year and historically has done exceptionally well in this area. Offerings in theater arts at the school range from classroom study of the discipline to acting in a full-length play before a public audience. In addition to classroom study and the production of two full-length plays each year, students may choose from a variety of opportunities offered by the program. These opportunities include working as an understudy, a member of one of the various support crews, a make-up artist, and stagehand or stage manager. Students may also choose from a number of field trips to local universities or the Tennessee Performing Arts Center to see college or professional plays. School faculty members also sponsor a number of clubs that offer additional opportunities for instruction and enrichment in a variety of areas. The clubs include the following: The Drama Club, BPA, FFA, FCCLA, Pep Club, Science Club, VICA, Math Club, Spanish Club, French Club, Chess Club, FCA, S-Club, FTA, Beta Club, Art Club, and HOSA. Many of these clubs are competitive at the district, regional, state, and national level. The school employs an awards program to recognize students whose academic performance, attendance and other meritorious work warrants acknowledgment. In addition to class rank as valedictorian, salutatorian and the top ten percent of the senior class, all other commendable efforts are rewarded. Students at Stewart County High School have the opportunity to become actively involved in student government. The Student Council hosts a full array of officers who represent the student body and provide various services for their peers and members of the faculty.

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Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Students at Stewart County High School also have the opportunity to enroll in on-line classes through Austin Peay State University and Nashville State Community College as a means of gaining dual credit and enrollment. In addition to various studies and academic pursuits within the regular school curriculum, Stewart County High School sponsors an enrichment program that offers students opportunities to explore interests in visual arts, performing arts, music and a variety of other cultural experiences. In addition to the vast number of opportunities in the aforementioned areas, the school also provides opportunities for social development through a variety of events. These events include a Valentine Dance sponsored by the Student Council and Homecoming Dances. Football homecoming and Valentines Day activities offer a wide variety of events to cater to various interests. In addition to these activities, a number of clubs sponsor weekend field trips to various institutions that offer academic growth and cultural awareness. Although a few of these activities sometimes infringe on instructional time and place additional burden on already busy faculty members, they offer unique opportunities for academic and social growth for a special group of students. Unique Programs/School Honors Near the end of each academic year, the school hosts the Black and Gold Awards, a program that acknowledges the achievements of students in each of the academic areas. SCHS also holds a Top Ten Percent Banquet in which the school’s top seniors are given special recognition each year. Further acknowledgment is given through various awards by individual departments such as athletic awards at the Athletic Banquets for each sport, awards for music at the Band Banquet, and awards in drama at the Theater Arts Awards Banquet. The school also recognizes academic achievement through an “in house” program that showcases those students who do not receive recognition through other programs. The Honor Roll includes students who receive all A’s, three A’s and one B, and two A’s and two B’s. These students are listed on the Gold, Silver, and Bronze Honor Rolls, which are statically posted in high traffic areas for optimum viewing by students and visitors. Coordinated School Health Program In April of 2001, Stewart County was awarded a grant from the Tennessee Department of Education to fund the initiation of a Coordinated School Health Program as designed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A coordinator for the program was hired and is working with Stewart County High School to implement and meet the standards and guidelines for Tennessee’s 20

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Coordinated School Health Program as set forth by the Department of Education and the Department of Health. Stewart County’s Director of School Health Services is housed at the high school and also serves as the school nurse. Accomplishments of the CSHP include: Character Counts! initiative in all schools (a comprehensive character education program); employee health surveys to determine the needs and desires of the staff; exercise and weight loss program for employees which includes purchase of exercise and weight equipment for SCHS faculty, staff and students; nutrition and health related information given to employees on a regular basis; procurement of posters, videos, charts, books and other items for teachers, guidance counselors, and Lifetime Wellness teacher; presentation by Belltone for vocational classes; presentation by the National MADD office dealing with character and self-respect; in-services for faculty and support staff on various CSHP topics; and character education and anger management classes at ALC. Last year, this program was award the Carol B. White Federal Physical Education grant. This program brought $90,000 in equipment and programming to students at Stewart County High School. The National School Lunch Program has added a requirement for schools to implement a wellness policy for the school year 2006/2007. One requirement of the policy is to have Healthy School Teams (HST). The SCHS-HST members represent the 8 Coordinated School Health (CSH) component areas. The team assesses student, family and staff needs using the CDC’s (Center for Disease Control) School Health Index (SHI). The SHI is a self-assessment of physical activity, health, nutrition and tobacco policies and programs. The teams map existing school and community resources contributing to a CSH mode, identify gaps and duplication, develop and implement a Building Level Action Plan. Family Resource Center The Family Resource Center, located at The Center for Teaching and Learning, provides families with an additional support system that assists them in identifying and addressing home/community barriers to their child’s success in school. Areas addressed include life coping skills, pre-natal and parenting classes, health issues, self-esteem programs for kindergarten, mentoring, and reading for preschoolers. This agency provides intervention for parents – helping to break the cycles of at-risk behaviors, which may lead to family disruption and impede school success. In conjunction with The Center, The Family Academy offers adult education services including GED preparation, workforce education, basic skills review, English as a second language classes, and other parent/student support. The Center has also partnered with the high school’s special education department in various projects. The Family Resource Center also took the lead in developing a Family Engagement Policy in the fall of 2005 with the purpose of creating a common 21

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

vision, setting expectations, increasing and improving involvement in academics, and details for each entity involved in family engagement. Further it can be used to conduct a family audit, develop programs, and make goals in the family involvement area.

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Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Peer Review Results for March of 2001 Stewart County High School has been fully accredited by the Southern Association since l964. In the spring of 2001, Stewart County High School participated in the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Peer Review process. The team was made up of the following people: Facilitator Dr. Kay Awalt-Musgrove Franklin Peer Review Team Chair Dr. Stan Baskin Rutherford County Peer Review Team Members Mr. Mark Beal Houston County Mrs. Evelyn Martinez, Montgomery County Mr. Shane Smith Montgomery County Mr. Richard Rawlings Humphreys County During this visit the team evaluated the school improvement planning and implementation process, identified the school’s strengths, made recommendations for strengthening school programs, activities and performance results, and assessed the school’s commitment to meeting the SACS standards. The commendations and recommendation are summarized in the following page.

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Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Summary of Peer Review Evaluation of Planning The self-study was professionally prepared and stakeholders openly discussed school issues. Evidence of a considerable time investment by the school staff was noted in collection and analysis of data. The team recommended updating test data on an annual basis and communicating the mission statement more effectively. The team also suggested creating a condensed version of the mission statement. Evaluation of the Action Plan The plan is accepted and supported by the staff and the school is committed to ongoing improvements. The team recommended including curriculum mapping in the school improvement plan. Areas to consider were more Advanced Placement courses, provision of courses which prepare students for university or technical study, preparation for ACT, review of exam exemption, flexibility of scheduling classes outside of a student’s current path and programs to increase a student’s understanding of global and cultural diversity. General Evaluation In the general evaluation, the committee found the staff to be highly qualified and the climate of the school outstanding. The school is safe and students enjoy freedoms not necessarily seen at other schools. A strong and varied course offerings exists. The committee recommended reviewing technology needs for students and staff including making it part of curriculum mapping. These needs should be communicated to the district. Examine additional support staff needs such as guidance, special education, technology coordinator, and media services. These needs should also be communicated to the district. Conclusion The review team found Stewart County High School to be an exceptional school with dedicated and caring staff and students. The community is justifiably proud of their efforts. Consequently, the review team recommends that Stewart County High School continue its accreditation by the Commission on Secondary and Middle Schools of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.

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Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Student, Parent and Community Demographic Data Student Characteristics Student enrollment at Stewart County High School has shown sharp increases during the six year period studied for this report. While figures have dipped slightly, the general trend is an increase in student population. Information from feeder schools confirms larger class sizes will be entering the high school for the next several years. The current net enrollment at Stewart County High School as of November 2007 school year was 731. Enrollment Data

Freshman

02-03 Boys Girls Total 92 88 180

03-04 Boys Girls Total 95 86 181

04-05 Boys Girls Total 91 87 178

05-06 Boys Girls Total 104 90 194

07-08 Boys Girls Total 88 88 176

164

06-07 Boys Girls Total 105 214 109 107 92 199

Sophomore

89

87

176

93

77

170

91

87

178

79

85

106

106

212

Junior

77

71

148

68

78

146

81

76

157

83

74

157

79

85

164

100

85

185

Senior

77

66

143

66

69

135

77

84

161

77

71

148

74

73

147

76

82

158

SelfContained Adult H.S.

4

2

6

4

3

7

6

5

11

1

2

3

3

2

5

4

1

5

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Totals

339

314

653

326

313

639

346

339

685

344

322

666

372

357

729

374

362

731

These figures can be attributed to many different reasons including persons moving into the area from regions outside Stewart County, and the increase in population transition from Fort Campbell to Stewart County. Students enrolled in the 2007-2008l year have the following ethnicity: 97.0 % white, 0.6% African-American, 1.2% Hispanic, 0.6 % Native American and 0.7% Asian, Hawaiian & Pacific Islander. The attendance as reported on the 2005 State Report Card was 94.2%. According to the Tennessee 2007 Report Card the percentage of students suspended was 0.9% and the percentage of expulsions was 0.0%. The cohort dropout was 7.1% in 2005, 0.5% in 2006 and 2.7 in 2007. The graduation rate now stands at 95%, which is significantly better than the state goal of 90%.

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Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

The following student data was collected concerning retention rates and transfer rates/withdrawals. Each year a decrease in noted. A significant drop occurred in 2004-05 due to interventions related to a credit recovery program that was put in place near the end of that year. Retention Rates 20012002

Grade 9 (173) 10 (152) 11 (141) 12 (124)

Total 20022003

Grade 9 (183) 10 (158) 11 (142) 12 (145)

Total

20032004

Grade 9 (174) 10 (169) 11 (145) 12 (128)

Total

# retained 20

Male

Female

Disadv.

Sp. Ed.

15

5

0

2

12

8

4

0

0

3

1

2

0

0

5

2

3

0

0

40

26

14

0

2

# retained 13

Female

Disadv.

Sp. Ed.

8

5

9

3

8

5

3

3

1

6

4

2

2

1

6

4

2

3

0

33

21

12

17

5

# retained 7

Male

Male

Female

Disadv.

Sp. Ed.

6

1

5

1

5

3

2

3

0

3

2

1

2

0

9

6

3

6

1

24

17

7

16

2

26

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan 20042005

Grade 9 (161) 10 (163) 11 (147) 12 (138)

Total 20052006

Grade 9 (198) 10 (159) 11 (147) 12 (144)

# retained 2

Male

Female

Disadv.

Sp. Ed.

1

1

0

1

3

1

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

5

2

3

# retained

Male

Female

5 3 7 0

Total

27

0 Disadv.

1 Sp. Ed.

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Transfer Rates/Withdrawals 20012002

Grade

9 10 11 12 Total

20022003

Grade

9 10 11 12 N Total 20032004

Grade

9 10 11 12 N Total

State Custody

5 4 0 1 10

State Custody

TN School System

Adult High School

8 11 7 4 30

0 0 0 5 5

Out of State

13 10 10 3 36

TN School System

Adult High School

Out of State

8 8 3 1 1 21

0 0 0 0 0 0

15 8 7 4 0 34

State Custody

TN School System

Adult High School

Out of State

3 1 0 0 1 5

5 6 4 1 0 16

1 2 1 0 0 4

0 0 0 3 0 3

10 10 9 7 1 37

28

Private School

Doctor

0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0

Private School

Doctor

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0

Private School

Doctor

0 0 1 0 0 1

0 0 0 0 0 0

Deceased

0 0 0 0 0

Deceased

0 0 0 0 0 0 Deceased

0 0 0 0 0 0

Drug Rehab.

Home School

0 0 0 0 0

0 4 1 0 5

Drug Rehab.

Home School

0 0 0 0 0 0

5 5 1 0 0 11

Drug Rehab.

Home School

0 0 0 0 0 0

7 7 1 2 3 20

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

20042005

Grade

State Custody

TN School System

Adult High School

Out of State

Private School

Doctor

Deceased

Drug Rehab.

9 10 11 12 N

Home School

2 15 0 8 0 0 0 0 6 0 8 1 9 0 0 0 0 3 0 5 0 3 0 0 0 0 5 0 5 10 7 0 0 1 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Total 3 34 11 27 0 0 1 0 17 2005- Grade State TN Adult Out Private Doctor Deceased Drug Home 2006 Custody School High of School Rehab. School System School State 9 6 10 3 11 5 12 2 N 1 Total 17

School Lunch Program Stewart County High School offers a quality, affordable school lunch program for the students of the school. Breakfast and lunch meals are served daily for the students and faculty. The cafeteria provides students with a variety of menu choices. Students may choose from the hot meat bar, sandwich isle, salad bar, healthy choice menu and specialty bar, as well as various side items. To encourage breakfast eaters the cafeteria added a mobile breakfast cart stationed near the student bus entrance. The school lunch program is subsidized by the Federal Government and therefore, students who qualify based on the household income from all sources of family are able to receive meals at no cost. The number reflecting these data are displayed here for review. School Year 2001-2002 2002-2003 2003-2004 2004-2005 2005-2006 2006-2007 2007-2008

Total Number Receiving Free Lunch 127 155 179 167 208 224 202 29

Total Number Receiving Reduced Lunch 48 54 45 55 63 66 88

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Parent/Guardian Characteristics Based on information gleaned from the registration process and school wide surveys, the following data was obtained: children living with natural parents totaled 54.1%, 18.5% resided with a natural parent and a step-parent; 23% lived with a single parent; and 3.4% lived with other guardians, and 1% had no response marked. These figures were based upon a total of 712 parent responses. The registration survey indicated the following educational levels of parents and guardians: 2.7% had some high school; 35.7% had a high school diploma; 3.5% had vocational or post secondary education; 10% had some college, 10% had college degrees; 2.1% had advanced degrees; and 36% had no level marked. These figures were based upon a total of 1305 parent responses. Registration information provided the following parent/guardian occupational information: 16.4% were classified as skilled; 5.8% were professional; 4.8% were in the military; 8.6% worked in factories; 28.6% were unclassified; less than 1% were agricultural; less than 1% were unemployed. Approximately 57% of the parents or guardians work outside of the county. Less than 1% of parents or guardians are attending school, 2.2 % are disabled, 1. 7% are retired, and 30.6% had no response. This information was gathered from 1266 responses. Figures from the U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000 indicated that the median household income for Stewart County was $32,316. The census report also revealed the following: 10.6% of families live in poverty; 29.9% of families with female householder/no husband present live in poverty; and 11.5% of related children age 5-17 are in families in poverty. The poverty rate for individuals is 12.4%.

Community Characteristics Stewart County is predominantly a rural area, located approximately 32 miles from three major cities. The county is comprised of 494 square miles and the 2000 Census reported a population of 12, 370. Stewart County High School is situated in the county seat of Dover with a population of 1,495. Current data shows that the population county wide has increased to 12,969. The community has a mix of small businesses, manufacturing plants, and service-related industries. Although much of the area is rural, farming is basically 30

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

supplemental income. The largest employer is TVA with 368 employees. Stewart County Board of Education is next with approximately 275 employees. Community involvement in Stewart County High School consists of parents through parent–teacher organizations, numerous businesses, industries, private organizations, individuals, and churches.

31

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Section 2 Defining the School’s Beliefs and Mission Chairman Jacquelyn Perigen, Math

Faculty Members Kent Cavallini, Social Studies Jenny Cook, Science Nancy Myers, Family & Consumer Science Elizabeth Shepherd, Music (Removed 2007-08) Dabney Peacher, Art Larry Riddick, Foreign Language Cheryl Wooten, Health Sciences Parents Anna Asselta Albert Hargis Kim Hargis Melissa Parker Teresa Westerman Jim Myers Students Caitlin Asselta Community Members Albert Hargis, F&M Bank Melissa Cavallini

32

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Part 2: Beliefs and Mission 2.1 Collaborative Process Overview: The Process of Defining the School’s Mission and Beliefs The task of this committee was to update the school beliefs and mission statement and create a vision statement. In addition, a school motto emerged. The process involved studying the school and community profile, refining of original statements from the previous plan, developing a mission statement and reanalyzing and prioritizing the belief statements. During the process, the committee collected input from stakeholders: community members, parents, students, board members and administration. After several meetings, the committee presented the statements for consensus. The following is a more detailed outline of the system used by the committee. The objective of this committee was to review the current MISSION STATEMENT, BELIEFS STATEMENT, VISION STATEMENT and MOTTO to ensure that the vision of the school reflected, not only the educational purpose of this institution, but also continued to reflect the values and concerns of the community in which we belong without compromising the integrity of Stewart County High School. The process involved input from faculty and staff at Stewart County High School, students, parents, community leaders, business partners, Board of Education members, school administrators, and alumni. This focus group determined that a group discussion involving parents and members of our community would ensue after all data had been collected. The following are the findings after the collection of data, analysis of the data, and conclusions drawn from that data. Data was obtained through 443 emails sent out to parents and community members with a survey on each of the fore mentioned areas. Hard copies of the survey were sent to the staff at Stewart County High School including custodians and cafeteria employees. Two hundred and thirty four responses, of which one hundred and forty four were a sample of the student population, were collected and analyzed. The following is a breakdown of the findings in each of the areas reviewed. Review of the Mission Statement found that seventy two percent of those who completed the survey found they strongly agreed or moderately agreed with the wording used and that the means in which faculty incorporated those principles into teaching matched with the goals inscribed within the Mission Statement for Stewart County High School. Discussion did suggest that the Mission Statement itself should be more visible to the students and the community. Ideas that came from these discussions were to add the Mission Statement to morning announcements, make it a part of all letterheads from Stewart County High School, and placing posters in key areas throughout the

33

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

school. The majority opinion rested with the notion of keeping the statement intact but making it more recognizable. Stewart County High School’s Vision Statement was also analyzed. Of the responders to the surveys, sixty six percent strongly agreed and moderately agreed to the spirit of its intent. Group discussion focused on the Vision Statement as a prelude to the Beliefs Statement. Review of this statement by parents, faculty, administration, and community members concluded that no further wording or change was needed at this time. Stewart County High School’s Beliefs Statement, outlined in its Vision Statement was also analyzed. Of those who responded to the surveys, sixty nine percent strongly or moderately agreed to the language held within as it related to the overall demeanor of the faculty demonstrated through instruction practices as well as concern for the success of the individual student. Discussion on this topic concluded that the Beliefs Statement pinpointed all important aspects in molding productive citizens and no change was offered to its wording. A suggestion was made to make these beliefs more visible as with the Mission Statement. Stewart County High School’s Motto was also surveyed and discussed. Seventy one percent of those polled strongly or moderately agreed that Stewart County High School believed that faculty, administration, and staff believed that the school’s intent was to “empower students to achieve.” Based upon all data collected and feedback from discussion with members of the committee, faculty, parents, and students, the committee concluded that the principles set forth in all of these sections should remain as is until such time as they need to be redefined. Findings of the committee were presented to the faculty on September 6, 2006, and consensus was reached to accept these statements as written. The motto, vision, mission and beliefs of Stewart County High School are presented on the following pages.

34

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

2.2 Clarity of Belief Statements/2.3 Comprehensive Belief Statements We Believe:  Decisions and policies are made collaboratively and will promote an orderly and safe school campus that is necessary for an appropriate learning environment.  Students need instruction and guidance to develop decision-making skills required for social and economic independence as responsible citizens.  The opportunity for success is the shared responsibility of the individual student, the family, the school, and the community.  Cultural diversity must be recognized and should be appreciated.  Frequent recognition of student effort and success will promote self-esteem and pride.  Instructional decisions shall ensure that curriculum is relevant and assessment is a continuous process.  Student competency in technological skills is vital and will be taught in our classrooms.  Students should be proficient in verbal and non-verbal communication.  A healthy lifestyle cultivates learning and advances opportunities throughout life.  Students can meet requirements for graduation in a timely manner. 35

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Motto “Empowering Students to Achieve”

Mission Statement 2.4 Clarity of Mission “The SCHS mission is to provide a safe, positive, and diverse educational environment in which students at all academic levels can attain the knowledge and skills necessary to become productive citizens.”

Vision Statement 2.5 Clarity of Vision “We, at SCHS, aspire to develop abilities that will grant all students the opportunities to achieve their highest ethical, mental, physical, and social potentials.”

36

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Section 3 Academic and Non-Academic Data Analysis

Chairman Janey Marshall, Guidance Faculty Members Jamie Baggett, Special Education (Removed 2007-08) Nancy Cason, English Connie Evans, Special Education Myles Holliday, Social Studies Mary Lambert, Business Education Sue Link, Special Education Ted Newberry, Construction Nicole Parker, Math Kristee Smith, English Joe Tanner, Special Education Katherine Watson, Science

37

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Part 3: Analysis of Academic and Non-Academic Data The task of this committee was to gather a variety of relevant data, academic and non-academic, in order to provide an adequate picture of academic performance at Stewart County High School and the significant factors that may affect that performance. Disaggregated data was used based on the NCLB subgroups when applicable. (3.1 List of Academic and Non-Academic Assessment Measures) Initially, the committee reviewed the current SIP, the State Report Card, and related school-level reports such as TVASS. The committee reached a consensus that more data must be obtained to complete a comprehensive analysis. Group members used a systematic method involving group discussion and a rating process to rank the available data and to determine the basis for inclusion. Subsequent sub-committees were appointed to gather the needed information in the identified areas. Academic assessment measures include ACT, Gateway tests, TCAP Writing Assessment, graduation rate/dropout rate, F-scores, and an analysis of vocational programs. Non-academic assessment measures include attendance, discipline, ISS, suspensions and expulsions, club participation, and the Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Following the data collection phase, committees organized the data and used charts when appropriate to collate and present graphic representations of trends. The data was disaggregated into the required NCLB student subgroups that were identified as significant at SCHS. Gender, grade level, special education, and economically disadvantaged were examined. The school is not ethnically diverse, so these subgroups were not considered. The committee found overall students have good attendance; perfect attendance has increased. However, some students have excessive absences that lead to failures. Failure rates for freshmen have declined in regular education and special education students. This decrease is attributed to the Homework Detention policy instituted as part of last year’s SIP. However over 50% of those freshmen failures were economically disadvantaged students. Failures in sophomores, juniors and seniors have also decreased. Dual Path students have more failures in their freshman and sophomore years. As students become more sure of their chosen path, these failure decrease. In 2005-06, SCHS exceeded the state graduation rate and passed the Federal benchmark of 90% (97.9%). Moreover, in 2004-05 and 2005-06, the school was well below the State goal for dropout rate. Data indicates that 38

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

dropout rates are highest among white males, over 18. Furthermore, research suggests that these students are overage for grade level. Based on a selfreported survey, an increasing number of students admit to substance abuse including cigarettes, alcohol, marijuana, and other drugs. A significant increase is noted from previous years. Students dropped below the State levels in all subject areas of the ACT for 2005-06. An examination of three years of Gateway scores indicate all Federal benchmarks have been met each year. The State Report Card shows a grade of B on the TCAP Writing Assessment for three years. This 3-yr average is below the predicted TVASS goal. A large number of students choose to participate in clubs and organizations. Vocational students are meeting state established standards as evidenced in competency reporting to the State. A school improvement action plan can be formulated based on this data analysis and the collated information from Section 4.

39

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

(3.4 Narrative Synthesis—strength and weaknesses noted at end of section) Narrative Synthesis of Academic Data Evaluating student progress must consist of an analysis of more than one type of data. This committee chose various academic and non-academic measures to accomplish its task. Although the teachers at SCHS use a variety of evaluation tools for assessment, including but not limited to projects, teachermade tests, and homework, the committee determined that analyzing National and State assessments were a high priority. An overview of student performance data on National and State level assessments is summarized below and graphically depicted on the following pages. Summary of Current Performance Data National Measures: The National student performance data collected consists of the ACT. Students who take the SAT represent less than 1% of our student population and were not included in the data collection. A five-year history of ACT participation included approximately 35% of the student population. Composite scores have fluctuated between 19.6 and 20.9. The average ACT scores in Math fall below all other tested areas. Moreover, the average Mathematics scores were consistently below the State and National ACT averages. During three of the five years studied, Stewart County High School students performed above the State ACT average in English. In 2001-02 and 2003-04, English scores were at or above both State and National levels. Reading scores were above State and National marks in 2000-01 and 20032004. While SCHS students performed at or above the State average ACT scores for three of the five years studied in Science Reasoning, the average ACT scores were consistently below the National average until 2001 -02. In this testing year, students scored at the National mark and well above the State average. A sharp decrease in all tested areas was seen in the 2002-03 school year, while the 2003-04 year showed significant increases in all areas. In 200506 all subject area tests showed a decline in scores. The school’s State Report Card shows a three year average of 20.4 in 2005 and a 20.6 in 2006. The number of Special Education students taking the ACT is not significant. State Measures: Statewide data includes the TCAP Writing Assessment given to eleventh graders, the Gateway tests given in Biology, Algebra I, and English II. The TCAP Writing test is given to all eleventh grade students in February. The State Report Card shows a grade of B in all three years reported, however, the 40

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

average student score increased from 3.7 in 2005 to a 3.9 in 2006. This 3-yr average is below the predicted TVASS goal. According to the school’s state report card of 2002-03, the school did not meet the Federal benchmark for English II in the economically disadvantaged student population. We tested 93.8% of our economically disadvantaged; the benchmark was 95%. Of those students, 80.8% scored proficient or advanced and the benchmark was 86%. Beginning in 2003-04, all Federal benchmarks have been met in Gateway testing.

41

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

(3.2 Data Collection and Analysis)

5-Year History of Average ACT Scores

ACT

Composite Scores

American College Testing

National ACT Composite scores have remained at a near constant of 21 over the last five years. State Composite scores have also shown a fairly consistent pattern over a 5-year period rising each year with the highest score to date occurring last year (20.7). Local scores have varied from year to year. A range of 19.6-20.9 is noted for the past five years. The lowest score (19.6) occurred in 2002-03. The highest score (20.9) occurred in 2004-2005. This score is four tenths higher than the State and equal to the National composite average. A significant drop occurred at the local level in 2002-2003, however, a significant increase occurred the next year followed by another two tenth increase in 2004-05. This was followed by another significant drop in 2005-06. While ACT Composite scores have been consistently below National, a 2-year period saw scores above the State. Our students scored better than the State with the exception of 2002-03 and 2005-06.

Average ACT Composite Scores 21.5 21.1

21.0

ACT Score

20.8 20.7

20.5

20.0

20.8 20.4

20.9

21.2

20.9

20.7

20.7

20.5

20.5

20.7 20.4

20.1

20.0 19.6

19.5

19.0

18.5 2001-02

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

Year

42

2005-06

2006-07

Composite National Composite State Composite Local

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

5-Year History of Average ACT Scores

Comparison of Subject Areas

ACT American College Testing

Clearly depicted in the data displayed below, Mathematics average ACT scores fall below all other tested areas. In no single school year did the average Mathematics ACT scores rise above any of the other tested areas, with the greatest drop in average scores(18.5) in 2002-2003 school year. The highest scores occurred consistently in Reading. Composite scores fluctuated only slightly over the five-year period with a high of 20.9 in 2004-2005. Although a significant drop occurred in 2002-2003, a significant gain occurred the following years only to fall again in 2005-06.

Average ACT Scores 20.4 20.1 20.9 20.7 19.6 20.7

Subject

Composite Science

20.4 20.1 20.6 20.3 19.8 20.8

Reading

20.7 20.8 20.5

2005-2006 2004-2005

21.9 21.9 21.7

2003-2004

19.6 19.3 19.5 19.2 18.5 19.1

Mathematics

2002-2003 2001-2002

20.4 20.1

English

16.0

2006-2007

2121.2 20.7

19.3

18.0

20.0 Score

43

22.0

24.0

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

5-Year History of Average ACT Scores

ACT

English

American College Testing

State ACT English scores steadily increased over the last five years. National scores have remained steady at 20.5/20.6 for 3 of the last five years. A slight increase occurred in 2005-2006. Local scores have been above State scores three out of the five years studied. Local scores were above both State and National scores in three of the years reported, but were well below both in the last year charted.

ACT English 21.5 21.2

21.0

21 20.7

Score

20.5 20.0

20.2 20.0

20.5 20.3

20.6 20.4

20.6 20.4

20.8 20.6

20.8 20.7 20.4

20.1

National State Local

19.5 19.3

19.0 18.5 18.0 20012002

20022003

20032004

20042005

Year

44

20052006

20062007

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

5-Year History of Average ACT Scores

Mathematics

ACT American College Testing

In each of the five years studied, the average Mathematics scores were consistently below the State and National average ACT scores. State ACT Mathematics scores increased somewhat over the last five years while the Local scores have seen a three year climb followed by a slight drop. National and State scores have steadily increased while Local scores have varied while remaining below State and National.

ACT Mathematics 21.0 20.5

20.6

20.6

20.7

20.7

19.7

19.7 19.5

20.0 Score

19.5 19.0

20.8

19.9 19.6 19.3 19.1

18.5

19.3

19.2

18.5

18.0 17.5 17.0 20012002

20022003

20032004

20042005

Year

45

20052006

National State Local

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

5-Year History of Average ACT Scores

Reading

ACT American College Testing

Local ACT Reading scores were above the National average three of the five years studied. Local ACT scores ranged six tenths of a point above the National average in these three years. Local scores were at or above State scores every year except 2002-2003 and last year. In the years where a significant decrease occurred in the local scores, gains were made in State and National scores—meaning Stewart County did not follow the general trend in scores.

ACT Reading 22.5 22.0

21.9

21.9

21.7

Score

21.5 21.0

21.1

21.2

21.3

21.3

21.1

21 20.8

20.5

20.5

21.4

20.8

20.8

21.5 21.1 20.7

20.5

20.0 19.5 20012002

20022003

20032004

20042005

Year

46

20052006

20062007

National State Local

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

5-Year History of Average ACT Scores

Science Reasoning

ACT American College Testing

ACT Science Reasoning scores for Stewart County High School have been at or above State levels for three of the five years examined. However, local scores were consistently at or below the National averages. Scores rebounded to an all time high in 2004-2005 with a score of 20.9, which exceeds the State and equals the National average for that year only to fall below both State and National averages in the next year.

ACT Science Reasoning 21.2 21.0

21 20.9

20.8

20.8

20.9

20.9

20.8

20.6

Score

20.5

20.4

20.4 20.3

20.2

20.3

20.2 20.1

20.0 19.9

19.8

19.8

19.6 19.4 19.2 20012002

20022003

20032004

20042005

Year

47

20052006

20062007

National State Local

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

TCAP Writing Assessment Summary

TCAP Writing Assessment

.P.

The majority of juniors obtained a Competent, Strong or Outstanding WRITING ASSESSMENT score in three of the four years reported. An increase1.1.1.1 in the level of proficiency is noted in 2003-04 over the previous year, then dropping slightly in the following year. The strongest scores are in 2005-06 with 92% of students scoring TESTING Competent or better.

1.1.2 T.C.A.P. 1.1.2.1 WRITING ASSESSMENT TESTING T.C.A.P. Writing Assessment Summary

Percent of Students

90 80

79

70

68

2002-2003 2003-2004 2004-2005 2005-2006 2006-2007

60 53

50 43

40

39 38

30

30 29

20

26 23 23

18

10 3 2 1 0

0 1

10 7

8 6 5 4 3

2

3 1

3

3

0

4

5

6

Paper Rating Written Paper Rating Score 1. = Deficient 2 = Flawed 3 = Limited 4 = Competent 5 = Strong 6 = Outstanding

48

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

(3.3 Disaggregation of Report Card Info) Note: also found in other sections Writing Scores Disaggregated by Relevant NCLB Subgroups Even in examining the NCLB subgroups, most students falling in these categories tested competent or better. The school only reports for one NCLB subgroup due to the limited number in other areas. Economically disadvantaged students are reported. Most tested in the competent area or better. While those in the special education subgroup fall in the “fewer than 45” reporting group, this is the next highest number of members in a subgroup for the school. The majority of these students scored competent or better as well. A very small number of students fall in both categories, but of those who do, the score pattern is similar with most scoring 4 or better.

NCLB Subgroup

Total Tested

Scoring 1

Scoring 2

Scoring 3

Scoring 4

Scoring 5

Scoring 6

Special Ed

14

0

4

1

7

2

0

Economically Disadvantaged

49

0

1

3

36

9

0

Special Ed and Economically Disadvantaged

6

0

2

0

3

1

0

49

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

GATEWAY

Tennessee Gateway Assessment

Assessment

Tennessee Gateway testing began in 2001-02 in Algebra I (Mathematics) and Biology (Science). English II (Language Arts) was added in 2002-03. Students in this assessment scored in one of three levels, Advanced, Proficient, or Below Proficient. In the charts below, the percentage of students scoring at each level is depicted for the last six semesters. Clearly evident is the fact that only a small percentage of students tested scored below proficient. Algebra I continues to produce the most Below Proficient scores. In English II, a considerable increase occurred in the advanced level during the Spring of 2005 compared to Fall of 2004. It should be noted when comparing fall to spring, significantly fewer students take the tests in the fall semesters. A significant increase in Advanced scores was seen when comparing Spring of 2005 to Spring of 2006. Tennessee Gateway Mathematics 140

120

100

Percent of Students

Spring 03 Fall 03

80

Spring 04

68

Fall 04 Spring 05

60

55

54

52

Spring 06

46

45 40

Spring 07

40

40

36 32

32

30

28 24

21

20

Fall 05

56

16 9

8 4

4

0 1 Below Proficient

2

3

Proficient

Advanced

50

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Tennessee Gateway Science 250

218

200

Percent of Students

Spring 03 Fall 03

150

Spring 04 Fall 04 Spring 05 Fall 05

100

Spring 06

74

73 66

33

39 24 21 21

1

1

0

3

0

2

3

30

1

0 1 Below Proficient

2 Proficient

Spring 07

66

61

52

46

50

79 77

3 Advanced

51

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Tennessee Gateway English 160 144 140

120

Percent of Students

Spring 03

100

Fall 03 Spring 04 Fall 04

80

72

74 72

71 65

64

Spring 05 Fall 05 Spring 06

60

Spring 07

41

38

40 29 24 20

29

26

22 20

19

4

7

6

3

4

7

40

8

0 1 Below Proficient

2 Proficient

3 Advanced

52

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

TVAAS (Value Added) State Report Card Cumulative Academic Gain/Value Added State Report Card 2006

Gateway/End of Course

Observed

Predicted

2006

Algebra I Gateway

554.6

551.3

NDD

Biology Gateway

544.6

550.4

Below

English II Gateway

533.7

535.5

NDD

Math Foundations End of Course

550.0

544.7

Above

English I End of Course

521.6

520.0

Above

Writing Assessment 2006 Writing Assessment 3 yr avg.

4.1 3.9

4.0 4.0

*Below in 3 year average

ACT Composite

20.3

20.8

NDD

ACT English

20.5

20.9

NDD

ACT Math

19.2

19.9

Below

ACT Reading

20.9

21.3

NDD

ACT Science

20.3

20.5

NDD

53

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

TVAAS 2004 Diagnostic Report for Writing Assessment While the value-added scores for 2004 were somewhat better than the previous 2 years, scores in quintiles 1, 2, and 3 show no adequate gains. Those in quintiles 4 and 5 only made slight gains.

Observed minus Predicted Score by Predicted Score Quintile Writing Assessment 1 (Lowest) 2004

2

3 (Middle)

5 (Highest)

4

Mean -0.0

-0.1

-0.1

0.0

0.1

Std Err

0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

Nr of Students

21

28

30

37

19

% of Students

15.6

20.7

22.2

27.4

14.1

-0.4

-0.3

0.1

-0.1

-0.2

Std Err

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

Nr of Students

45

47

59

47

39

% of Students

19.0

19.8

24.9

19.8

16.5

2 Previous Years Mean

54

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

TVASS 2005 Diagnostic Report for Writing Assessment No adequate gains were made in any of the quintiles. Less gain was made than in the previous two-year average in all quintiles except in the 3rd quintile.

Observed minus Predicted Score by Predicted Score Quintile Writing Assessment 1 (Lowest) 2005

Mean

2

3 (Middle)

5 (Highest)

4

-0.7

-0.4

-0.1

-0.3

-0.3

Std Err

0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

Nr of Students

22

24

35

37

23

% of Students

15.6

17.0

24.8

26.2

16.3

-0.4

-0.2

-0.2

-0.2

-0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

Nr of Students

45

61

51

62

40

% of Students

17.4

23.6

19.7

23.9

15.4

2 Mean Previous Std Err Years

55

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

TVASS 2006 Diagnostic Report for Writing Assessment Gains were made in all of the quintiles, except the highest. Less gain was made than in the previous two-year average in the 3rd quintile. No gain was made in the 5th quintile. Observed minus Predicted Score by Predicted Score Quintile 1 (Lowest) Writing 2006 Assessment

Mean

2

3 (Middle)

5 (Highest)

4

-0.0

0.3

0.3

-0.1

-0.3

Std Err

0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

Nr of Students

16

32

35

29

25

% of Students

11.7

23.4

25.5

21.2

18.2

-0.5

-0.3

-0.1

-0.3

-0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

Nr of Students

68

85

85

99

63

% of Students

17.0

21.2

21.2

24.8

15.8

Previous Mean Year(s) Std Err

56

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

TVAAS 2004 Diagnostic Report for Gateway Biology I Value-added data shows only students in the first quintile made adequate gains. All other quintile scores indicate insufficient gains.

Biology I

Observed minus Predicted Score by Predicted Score Quintile 1 (Lowest)

2

3 (Middle)

4

5 (Highest)

Mean

7.0

-9.7

-14.3

-3.2

-7.1

Std Err

6.0

6.1

3.1

4.1

3.5

Nr of Students

25

30

34

34

41

% of Students

15.2

18.3

20.7

20.7

25.0

-16.5

-9.2

-12.8

-17.6

-18.0

4.8

3.8

2.7

2.3

3.3

50

51

67

70

44

17.7

18.1

23.8

24.8

15.6

2 Mean Previous Std Err Years Nr of Students % of Students

57

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

2005 Diagnostic Report for Gateway Biology I No sufficient gains were made in any quintile.

Observed minus Predicted Score by Predicted Score Quintile Biology I 1 (Lowest) 2005

2 Previous Years

2

3 (Middle)

5 (Highest )

4

Mean

-7.6

-8.4

-12.1

-7.8

-13.3

Std Err

11.1

7.1

4.4

2.5

3.4

Nr of Students

10

22

35

56

38

% of Students

6.2

13.7

21.7

34.8

23.6

-2.5

-10.7

-13.5

-8.5

-11.0

Std Err

4.4

4.7

2.6

2.5

2.7

Nr of Students

46

54

70

76

63

% of Students

14.9

17.5

22.7

24.6

20.4

Mean

58

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

2006 Performance Diagnostic Report for Gateway Biology I

Predicted Proficiency Group Not Proficient Biology 2006 I

Previous Year(s)

Proficient

Mean Std Err

Advanced

-7.2

-5.7

5.7

1.8

Nr of Students

2

37

154

% of Students

1.0

19.2

79.8

-6.2

-8.1

3.7

1.4

Mean Std Err Nr of Students

1

77

247

% of Students

0.3

23.7

76.0

59

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

2006 Diagnostic Report for Algebra I Gains were made in the 1st and 2nd quintiles, but not in the others.

Mean Student Score

Mean Score %tile

Mean Pred Score

Pred. Score %tile

School Effect

School Effect %tile

School vs State Avg

Test

Year

N

Algebra I

2004

173

550.7

64

544.5

58

6.0

70

Above

2005

182

541.2

55

542.9

55

-1.7

46

NDD

2006

165

554.6

65

551.3

62

3.2

61

NDD

3-Yr-Avg

520

548.6

61

546.1

59

25

61

NDD

60

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

2006 Performance Diagnostic Report Gateway English II Gains were made at the “Proficient” level, while no gains were made in the “Advanced” scores.

Predicted Proficiency Group Not Proficient English II

2006

Mean Std Err

Previous Year(s)

Proficient

Advanced -1.3

-2.4

5.0

2.1

Nr of Students

2

27

129

% of Students

1.3

17.1

81.6

-4.9

0.2

2.8

1.5

Mean Std Err Nr of Students

7

92

221

% of Students

2.2

28.8

69.1

61

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Graduation Rate The state has provided a school report card for the graduation rate. Each year Stewart County High School has been above the state average. The NCLB goal for graduation is currently 90% and although the school exceeded the state graduation rate 2004, we were a targeted school in this area. The following year we were in good standing in this area and in 2005 the school exceeded the state by a significant percent. In 2006, the school’s graduation rate was at 97.9%. Using the NCLB subgroups, four years of data was gathered on non-graduates, including dropouts, to determine any trends that might be affecting graduation rates. School Report Card Information

Graduation Percent

2003

2004

2005

2006

State Goal

82

76.7

85.9

97.9

90

Based on an analysis of the data from the Horizon database, the following was noted. Dropouts over 18 comprised the majority of students not receiving a diploma. Those students who dropped out impacted the graduation rate significantly more than students who received special education diplomas. Moreover, approximately half of those receiving special education diplomas were CDC students.

62

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Diplomas Earned 2004-05 144 2005-06 147

Regular Diplomas during the school year

2004-05 2005-06

Regular Diplomas during the summer

138 143

2004-05 2005-06

Special Education Diplomas were issued

6 2

2004-05 2005-06

In 2004-05, only four students over the age of 18 were reported as dropping out. No students under the age of 18 fell in this category. Carrie Howell, a faculty member and doctoral candidate, conducted a thorough study of SCHS dropouts from 1993-2003. To summarize her analysis, the majority of dropouts from SCHS are white males, over 18, overage for their grade level, and usually in the 10th and 11th grade. A copy of her research can be made available if needed.

Dropout Rate-State Goal Student dropout rates were examined using the State Report Card. The State Report Card information shows progress toward the State goal. A decline in numbers is noted all three years reported. The school was well below the State goal in 2004-05 and 2005-06. School Report Card Information School Year

Local Dropout Cohort

State Dropout Cohort

2002-2003

11.1

11.3

B-Above Average

2003-2004

10.2

10.7

B-Above Average

2004-2005

7.1

State Goal Below 10.0

Met State Goal

2005-2006

0.5

State Goal Below 10.0

Met State Goal

63

Grade

0 2

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

FAILURES AND POSSIBLE FACTORS (3.3 Disaggregated) To determine failure rates and possible factors, student failure data was gathered. Based on failure data gathered from the Horizon Database, the following was noted. For the freshman class of 2001-2002 the failure rate was 37%. In 2005-2006 the reported number of freshman failing one or more classes was 11%. This was the first year the homework detention policy was implemented. The number of freshmen special education students failing in at least one course dropped from 10% in 2000-2001 to 4% in 2003-2004 for the same group of students. The general trend noted in the special education group is that as students progress to the higher grades the number of failures decreases. This is not the case when examining all student failures. Percentage of Students Who Failed 1 or More Classes 40 37 36 35

33 30 29

30

28 26.5

% of Students

25

23.5

26

26

26

24 22

22

Freshmen Sophomores

20

Juniors Seniors

16 15 15

13 11 10

10

8

5

0 2001-2002

2002-2003

2003-2004

2004-2005

2005-2006

64

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Percentage of Students Classified as Special Education Who Failed 1 or More Courses 10

9

8.7

8

Percentage of Students

7

6

5.7 Freshmen

5.3

Juniors

4.1 3.5

Sophomores

4.5

4.4 4

5

4.8

5

3.9

4

Seniors

4

3.5 3

3

2.6 2

2

1

1

0.8

1.2 0.7

0 2001-2002

2002-2003

2003-2004

2004-2005

2005-2006

Economically Disadvantaged Factors To determine if economic factors contribute to failure, data was gathered from the Horizon Database. Data from 2002-2003 and 2003-2004 was the only available data. For these two school years some interesting numbers are presented. For example the percentage of students classified as economically disadvantaged failing at least one class as a freshman in 2002-2003 was 53.5%, while the senior class failure rate was 15%. The number of failures for fall classes ranged from 41-47 in 2002-2003. Similar results were noticed for the school year 2003-2004, 55% of the freshman class failing at least one class were classified as economically disadvantaged, while only 33% of the senior class was classified as economically disadvantaged.

65

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Percentage of Freshman Failing 1 or More Courses 60

53.5 55

% of Students

50 40 2002-2003

30

2003-2004

20

2004-2005

14.28 9.3

6.4

10

2005-2006

7.1

0.59 0.07 0

% of Students

Economically Disadvantaged

50 40 30 20 10 0

Economically Disadvantaged and Special Education

45 Percentage of Sophomores Failing 1 or More Courses

36

2002-2003 2003-2004

13

14

9

2004-2005

2.32.31.2

Economically Disadvantaged

2005-2006

Economically Disadvantaged and Special Education

% Percentage of Students

Percentage of Juniors Failing 1 or More Courses 50 40 30 20 10 0

40

2002-2003

30

2003-2004

7.4

5

Economically Disadvantaged

6.4

2004-2005

7.1

0

1.3

2005-2006

Economically Disadvantaged and Special Education

% of Students

Percentage of Seniors Failing 1 or More Courses 40 30 20 10 0

33 2002-2003 15

6

2

Economically Disadvantaged

2003-2004

6 0.07

0

0

Economically Disadvantaged and Special Education

66

2004-2005

2005-2006

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

STUDENTS FAILING ONE OR MORE COURSES BY CLASS AND CHOSEN PATH To determine the effect of chosen path on student failure rate student failure data was gathered. Based on failure data gathered from the Horizon Database, the following was noted. Dual Path students have more failures in their freshman and sophomore years. As students become more sure of their chosen path, these failures decrease. The following graphs are provided for further review. Freshman Failure in One or More Courses 30

26 25

20

# of Students

18

18

18

18

17 16 15 15

Technical Path University Path

13

Dual Path

12 10

9

5

4

4

3

3

0

2001-2002

2002-2003

2003-2004

2004-2005

2005-2006

Sophomores Failure in One or More Courses 25 22

22

22

# of Students

20

15

19

14

14 13

Technical Path

12

University Path

11 10 10

10

Dual Path

10

9

6

6

5

0 2001-2002

2002-2003

2003-2004

2004-2005

2005-2006

67

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Juniors Failure in One or More Courses 30

26 25

# of Students

20 17

17 Technical Path

15 15

University Path

13

Dual Path

12 11 10 10

10

10

9 8 5

5

5 3

0

2001-2002

2002-2003

2003-2004

2004-2005

2005-2006

Senior Failure in One or More Courses 25

21 20 18

# of Students

15

14 Technical Path

13

University Path Dual Path

10 10

9 8 7 6 5

5

5

4 3 2 1

0

2001-2002

2002-2003

2003-2004

2004-2005

2005-2006

68

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Carl Perkins Report Card The Carl Perkins Report Card contains data that reflects student proficiency with diverse types of technology. Core indicators that measured academic attainment, skill proficiencies, and high school completion were analyzed. In interpreting this data, it is important to note that each Local Education Agency (LEA) benchmarks against its own performance and not the state data. For comparison, the charts present performance data for both the negotiated and the actual performance levels for the (LEA) for the last three reporting years. For reporting and analysis, data is broken down by core indicators.

Academic Attainment Measure 1S1 reflects the number of secondary vocational concentrators graduating from high school. This measure combines high school completion with the State Academic Assessment System. The high school graduation rate includes the pre-requisite that students pass the Tennessee Comprehensive Assessment Program (TCAP) competency test in the areas of math and language arts. This will be replaced by the Gateway assessments. Stewart County exceeded the negotiated level for all years reported prior to the 20022003 academic year. During this year a trend began whereby the actual performance level consistently fell short of the negotiated performance level. The 2002-2003 academic year reflects the lowest performance level in this category with a shortfall of 7.68%. However, the data reported for the 2004-2005 academic year reflects 5.88% improvement from the previous year even though the actual performance level missed the negotiated performance level by a 1.8% margin. The data suggests that improvement is needed in this category.

1S1 Core Indicator Comparison of LEA Negotiated and Actual Performance Levels 100 95 90 85 80 75

Negotiated Performance Levels Actual Performance Levels

2000-01 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05

69

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Career-Technical Skill Proficiencies Measure 1S2 shows the number of concentrators who have met Stateestablished, industry validated career and technical standards. Occupational skill attainment of vocational concentrators is measured through course competencies established for each vocational course, which incorporate national and industry standards (where available) as well as input from business and industry representatives in the State. As the table indicates, Stewart County surpassed the LEA negotiated performance level in this category for all reporting years.

1S2 Core Indicator Comparison of LEA Negotiated and Actual Performance Levels 105 Negotiated Performance Levels

100 95

Actual Performance Levels

90 85 2000-01 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05

Completion Measure 2S1 illustrates the number of secondary vocational concentrators graduating from high school. This measure reflects the completion rate of students who have met all State Board of Education requirements to receive a high school diploma. In this category, Stewart County outperformed the local negotiated level in 2000-2001 and 2001-2002. In the years following, Stewart County has failed to achieve the negotiated performance levels. The margin of shortfall has fluctuated during this period with the greatest discrepancy occurring during the 2003-2004 academic year. During this time the local actual performance level missed the negotiated performance level by 7.68%. The data reported for the 2004-2005 academic years reflects a 5.88% improvement from 70

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

the previous two reporting periods even thought the actual performance level missed the negotiated performance level by a 1.8% margin. The data shows that improvement is needed in this area.

2S1 Core Indicator Comparison of LEA Negotiated and Actual Performance Levels 100 95 90 85 80 75

Negotiated Performance Levels Actual Performance Levels

2000-01 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05

Disaggregated Data (3.3 for Vocational subgroups) This issue was addressed by the State Department of Vocational Education and beginning in the 2004-2005 academic year reliable disaggregated data became available. In accordance with the No Child Left Behind legislation, the only subgroup that Stewart County meets the population ratio requirements in is for economically disadvantaged students. The Performance of students in this population cluster can be broken down by Core Indicators. Economically disadvantaged students exceeded the LEA actual performance levels for Core Indicators 1S1 (Academic Attainment), 1S2 (Career-Technical Skill Proficiencies), and 2S1 (Completion). In 1S2 the subgroup surpassed the negotiated level. For 1S1 and 2S1 the subgroup missed the negotiated level by a small margin of .18%. The data shows for indicators 4S1 (Participation Nontraditional) and 4S2 Completion Non-traditional) that the subgroup did not meet the negotiated levels nor the LEA actual performance areas. This is reflective of the deficiency found in our overall student population in regards to non-traditional participation and completion in career and technical programs. Participation Non-Traditional Measure 4S1 illustrates the number of students in underrepresented gender groups who participate in a non-traditional secondary vocational programs. State/Local Administrative Data is the measurement approach used for this core indicator of performance. Stewart County surpassed the LEA negotiated 71

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

performance level in this category for the reporting years between 2000 and 2002. Beginning in the 2002-2003 academic year the actual performance level fell short of the negotiated performance level. This downward trend continued during the 2003-2004 academic year. Although the actual performance level remained 3.59% below the negotiated performance level for the 2004-2005 academic year, a slight improvement can be seen in participation of underrepresented gender groups in non-traditional secondary vocational programs. However, the overall data indicates this is an area of weakness which will need to be addressed by Stewart County.

72

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Completion Non-Traditional Measure 4S2 shows the number of concentrators in underrepresented gender groups who completed a non-traditional secondary vocational program. State/Local Administrative Data is the measurement approach used for this core indicator of performance. In this category, Stewart County outperformed the negotiated performance level in 2001-2002 and 2002-2003 academic years. However, the data shows a decline in performance in this area beginning in the 2002-2003 reporting year. The lowest actual performance level during the fiveyear period occurred during the 2003-2004 academic year where it fell 9.70% short of the negotiated level. A slight improvement can be seen during 20042005, but the actual performance level still fell 6.22% short of the negotiated performance level. The data shows that this is an area of weakness in some of Stewart County’s Career and Technical program areas.

73

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Academic Attainment (1S1) Error! Not a valid link.

74

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

NON-ACADEMIC ASSESSMENTS Discipline (3.3 Disaggregated by Grade) Student discipline was examined as a non-academic area of data. Based on discipline data gathered from the Horizon database, the following was noted. Over the past three years an average of 68% of students acquired no discipline points, 15% acquired 1-25 discipline points, and 11% acquired more than 25 discipline points. The number of students that have been sent to in-schoolsuspension increased slightly last year due changes in the discipline policy. Suspensions have decreased. Placements in the Alternative Learning Center have decreased. Expulsion rates have been less than 1% of the student body over the past three years.

Discipline Points Freshmen 140 st 120 n100 e d 80 u t 60 S 40 f o 20 # 0

Sophomores 140 st 120 n100 e d 80 u t 60 S 40 f o 20 # 0

None 1-25 Points > 25 Points

2002- 2003- 2004- 20052003 2004 2005 2006

1-25 Points > 25 Points

2002- 2003- 2004- 20052003 2004 2005 2006

Juniors 140 st 120 n100 e d 80 u t 60 S 40 f o 20 # 0

None

Seniors 120 st 100 n e 80 d tu 60 S 40 f o 20 # 0

None 1-25 Points > 25 Points

2002- 2003- 2004- 20052003 2004 2005 2006

None 1-25 Points > 25 Points

2002- 2003- 2004- 20052003 2004 2005 2006

ISS 75

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Students in ISS st n e d u t S f o #

250 200 150 100 50 0

Students in ISS

Suspensions Freshmen ts 40 n e 30 d ut 20 S10 f o # 0

Sophomores

36 23

21 11 8

9 12 3

Male

4

Female

0

2001- 2002- 2003- 2004- 20052002 2003 2004 2005 2006

ts 30 n25 e 20 d ut 15 S10 f 5 o # 0

27 14

10

9

1

4

10 3

3

st 20 n e 15 d ut 10 S5 f o # 0

Male

8 3

5

Female

20

Seniors

15 7

Male

2001- 2002- 2003- 2004- 20052002 2003 2004 2005 2006

Juniors st 20 n e 15 d ut 10 S5 f o # 0

20 14

2

Female

0

2001- 2002- 2003- 2004- 20052002 2003 2004 2005 2006

76

15 11 2

Male

5 10

2

3

10

2001- 2002- 2003- 2004- 20052002 2003 2004 2005 2006

Female

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Expulsions Freshmen st 12 n10 e 8 d u t 6 S 4 f 2 o # 0

st 6 n5 e4 d u t3 S2 f1 o #0

10 6 2

0

Male Female

11

00

00

2001- 2002- 2003- 2004- 20052002 2003 2004 2005 2006

5 3 1

0

2

Male

2

0

Female

0

00

2001- 2002- 2003- 2004- 20052002 2003 2004 2005 2006

Seniors

5 st 4 n e3 d u t S2 f o1 # 0

Sophomores

4 st n 2.5 e 2 d 1.5 tu 1 S 0.5 f o 0 #

3 Male

1 0

Female

1

00

0

00

2 Male

1 00

00

00

Female

00

2001- 2002- 2003- 2004- 20052002 2003 2004 2005 2006

Alternative Learning Center Freshmen 20 ts n15 e d u t 10 S f 5 o # 0

Sophomores

17 11 6 2

3

Male

7 2

1

2 2

Female

10 s t 8 n e 6 d u t 4 S f 2 o # 0

2001- 2002- 2003- 2004- 20052002 2003 2004 2005 2006

9

9 7

Male

2

0 0

2001- 2002- 2003- 2004- 20052002 2003 2004 2005 2006

Seniors

9 6

5 2 2

5 1

Female

2 0

Juniors 10 s t 8 n e d 6 tu 4 S f 2 o # 0

7

5

Male Female

0

0 0

2001- 2002- 2003- 2004- 20052002 2003 2004 2005 2006

12 ts 10 n e 8 d tu 6 S 4 f o 2 # 0

11 Male

3 1

0

1

0

3 1

Female

1

0

2001- 2002- 2003- 2004- 20052002 2003 2004 2005 2006

77

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

ATTENDANCE (3.3 Disaggregated by Grade) To determine the extent to which students conduct themselves in a responsive manner, student attendance information was gathered. Based on attendance data gathered from the Horizon Database, the following was noted. In 2003-2004, perfect attendance fell to 11% by State standards whereas only 3.9% of students were present for the entire school day. The 2003-2004 entire school day attendance is a dramatic increase from the 1% low of 2001-2002. In 2003-2004, only 1.6% of the student body missed 28 or more days. This is a major decrease from 2000-2001's 3.1%. The attendance policy was changed for the 2006-07 school year. Attendance data will be charted differently so that the significance of the new policy can be studied. It should be noted that attendance events greater than ten have increased across all grade levels in 2005-06.

Freshman Attendance Events 150 s t 100 n e d 50 u t S f 0 o r e b m u N

122

120

140

131

113 69

13

31

23

31

24

36

Semester 1

Semester 2

Semester 1

Semester 2

Semester 1

Semester 2

2003-2004

2003-2004

2004-2005

2004-2005

2005-2006

2005-2006

1--9 10+

Sophomore Attendance Events s t n e150 d u t 100 S f o 50 r e 0 b m u N

1--9 10+

Semester 1

Semester 2

Semester 1

Semester 2

Semester 1

Semester 2

2003-2004

2003-2004

2004-2005

2004-2005

2005-2006

2005-2006

78

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Junior Attendance Events s t n e120 d u t 100 S 80 f 60 o 40 r 20 e 0 b m u N

1--9 10+

Semester 1

Semester 2

Semester 1

Semester 2

Semester 1

Semester 2

2003-2004

2003-2004

2004-2005

2004-2005

2005-2006

2005-2006

Senior Attendance Events s t n e 80 d tu60 S f 40 o r 20 e 0 b m u N

1--9 10+

Semester 1

Semester 2

Semester 1

Semester 2

Semester 1

Semester 2

2003-2004

2003-2004

2004-2005

2004-2005

2005-2006

2005-2006

79

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Participation in Student Organizations Being involved in student organizations is linked to students’ engagement in the learning process. With this premise in mind, participation in student organizations was examined. Based on data gathered from various faculty advisors the following was noted. A wide variety of organizations are available for student participation spanning sport, vocational, fine art, and academic areas. An average of 57% of students participate in vocational organizations, 23% participate in sports organizations, 26% participate in academic organizations, 16% participate in fine art organizations, and 14% participate in other miscellaneous organizations.

Students Participating in Extra Curricular Activities

# of Students

Academic Organizations 53

60 50 40 30 20 10 0

42 29

28

Science Club

Math Club

Average membership over past 3 years

Foreign Language Club

Beta Club

45 19

18

Girls Basketball

Cheerleading

Boys Basketball

18

Baseball

29 19

Softball

50 40 30 20 10 0

Football

# of Students

Sports Organizations

Average membership over past 3 years

Vocational Organizations 74

# of Students

80

61

60

60

59

45 Average membership over past 3 years

40 19 20 0 Skills USACosmo

Skills USATrades

FFA

FCCLA

HOSA

80

BPA

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Participation in Student Organizations continued…….

# of Students

Fine Art Organizations 31

32 30 28

Average membership over past 3 years

26

26 24 22 Drama

Band

# of Students

Miscellaneous Organizations 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

52

15

FCA

Yearbook Staff

81

Average membership over past 3 years

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Appropriate Choices One factor that may place students at risk for course failures, attendance problems, and/or dropping out of school is substance abuse. To ascertain student patterns of substance abuse at SCHS, an analysis of the Pride Questionnaire was done. This is a self-report survey administered annually by the Coordinated School Health Program to all 12th grade Stewart County High School seniors. It reflects prevalence and patterns of drug and alcohol use. Graphically depicted below are cigarette, drug and alcohol information for 19992001. Students reported low use of more hard-core substances such as cocaine and more frequent use of beer and liquor. Annual and monthly use of beer and liquor had increased over the three-year period while cigarette use showed a general decline. Students Reporting Monthly Use

Cigarettes

Beer

2004 2001

Liquor

2000 1999

Marijuana

Cocaine 0

10

20

30

40

50

60

Percentage of Students Reporting Use

This same survey was not done in 2002; however, the Youth Risk Behavior Survey was done in 2003 and 2006. Student participation was approximately three-fourths of the total school population. Charts could not be combined due to a difference in data collection. Results are as follows: 1. Monthly use of cigarettes doubled from 14.8% in 2003 to 28.4% in 2006. 2. Alcohol consumption in a 30-day period increased from18% to 38.6%. 3. Marijuana use has also increased. Only 9.7% reported using marijuana at least once during a 30-day period in 2003 compared to 17.3% in 2006. 4. In 2003, fifteen percent of students reported that during their lifetime the following drugs have been used-methamphetamines, 82

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

5.

heroin, cocaine, and ecstasy. The largest use was in the meth category in 2003, but a decrease was reported in 2006. Another significant figure is that over 30% of students were offered an illegal drug on school property in the 30 days prior to the survey.

Youth Risk Behavior Survey

Offered a Drug on School Property

30 0 11

Cocaine Meth

15

2006 2003

5.7 0 17.3

Marijuana

9.7 38.6

Alcohol

18

Cigarettes

14.8

28.4

0

10

20

30

40

50

% of Students Reporting Monthly Risk A similar survey was conducted in 2004. In every major category reported on the previous chart, an increase in use is noted. This survey also had a section of questions related to student violence. Twentyseven percent of students reported that they participated in fighting one-three times during a twelve-month period.

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(3.4 Narrative of Strengths and Needs—see intro to section 3 for a more detailed narrative of all data) SUMMARY OF STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES Strengths 1. Students are performing on Gateway exams at or above levels of previous years. All Federal benchmarks were met. 2. Graduation rate exceeded the NCLB benchmarks. 3. The dropout rate has reached the State goal of below 10%. 4. Vocational concentrators are meeting state established industry validated career and technical standards through the demonstrated mastery of course specific competencies. 5. A low number of special education students fail one or more courses. 6. There was a decrease in freshman failures across all studied NCLB subgroups. 7. ALC placements decreased. 8. Freshman, sophomore, and junior attendance has improved. (NOTE: have not studied this in light of new attendance policy)

Weaknesses 1. ACT scores are not consistently high enough to guarantee monetary assistance through the state scholarship program. A composite of 21 is required. 2. Math scores are consistently below state and national levels on ACT. 3. There are not enough gains in the higher level writing scores (too few students score 5s and 6s). 4. Value added scores in Biology were rated below expected gains. 5. No gains were made in the middle and high quintiles for Algebra I (value added). 6. No value added gains were made at the higher end for English II. 7. Monthly use of alcohol and illegal substances has doubled according to YRBS and reports of on-campus access has increased. 8. The graduation rate of vocational concentrators did not meet the negotiated performance level (a direct correlation of number 1). 9. Also reported in YRBS, one fourth of students admitted to participation in fighting.

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(3.5 Prioritized List of Goal Targets) TARGETED GOALS

ACT Composite- the number of students scoring a 21 or higher will increase. ACT Math- average scores will meet or exceed state and national scores. Writing- more students will score strong and/or outstanding on the TACP Writing Assessment. Math Gateway- more gains will be made in the higher quintiles on Algebra I. English II Gateway- more gains will be made in the higher quintiles on English II. Biology- valued added scores will show a gain.

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Section 4 Curricular, Instructional, Assessment and Organizational Effectiveness Chairman Anita Gray, Science Faculty Members Connie Baggett, Vocational Instructor Kent Cavalinni, Social Studies Mike Craig, Vice-Principal 2007-08 Marcia Joiner, Mathematics Steve Nolen, Assistant Principal (Removed 2007-08) Denise Peppard, School Nurse (Removed 2007-08) Community Members Steven Ford, Vocational Advisory Terry Moore, Vocational Advisory David Phillips, Vocational Advisory Bryan Watson, F&M Bank President Ian Smith, TVA Law Enforcement Jim Myers, Vocational Advisory, Sills Insurance Debbie Holland, RN Vocational Advisory, Gateway Medical Greg Barrow, Vocational Advisory, Paramedics/EMS Director Jim Butkiewicz, Vocational Advisory. Butkiewicz Foundation Robin Clark, Vocational Advisory, Dover Elementary Science Teacher Elaine Jackson, Vocational Advisory, Coordinated School Health Students/Recent SCHS Graduates Ashley Hargis, Austin Peay State University Ashlea Dollar, Austin Peay State University Whitni Earhart, Austin Peay State University Kyle Copeland, University of Tennessee at Martin Brittany Boyer, David Lipscomb University Joe Shannon, Covington Seminary School Other School System Personnel Sally Matthew, Bookkeeper Jamie Bogard, Payroll Francis Carson, Vocational Supervisor

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Section 4: Analysis of Curricular, Instructional, Assessment and Organizational Effectiveness Narrative Description of the Process The purpose of this section is to provide an overview of the analysis of curricular, instructional, assessment and organizational effectiveness by focusing on collaboration, decision making, resource allocation, instructional practices and organizational conditions of Stewart County High School. The focus of this section was to systematically examine these areas of the school, determine the alignment with the beliefs and mission, and ascertain areas of strengths as well as limitations. This information in conjunction with student performance analysis will be used to design the action plan for school improvement. Information and data for this section was obtained from several data sources:  Effective Schools 05-06. Survey were used to provide an overview of static factors and delineate the present state of the school’s organizational and instructional effectiveness. Surveys were distributed to parents, students, educators and support staff.  Teacher Survey (open-ended questions) created by this committee was distributed to all teachers at Stewart County High School during November 2006. Forty surveys were returned and the data evaluated. A second objective answer survey dealing with the areas of instructional strategies was created, based on answers from the first survey.  Advisory Council Survey created by this committee was distributed to members of the Stewart County High School Advisory Council during January, 2007(see Section 4 Members for partial listing).  A survey of all SCHS teachers was taken by having the teachers bring their state mandated curriculum to a faculty meeting during November 2006.  An advisory council meeting of former SCHS students, now college students from Austin Peay State University, David Lipscomb University, Covington Seminary School, and University of Tennessee Martin. See Section 4 Members list.  Stewart County Schools extended contract handbook.  Stewart County Schools payroll manager, Jamie Bogard.  Stewart County High School accountant, Sally Mathews.  Stewart County High School principal, Chris Guynn. The committee reviewed the data and through group discussion and statistical analysis from all the data sources, identified the perceived strengths and areas of concern in each category. 87

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Analysis of the evidence produced conditions that were reputed as priorities for school improvement. The priorities established are outlined using the following three main goals: Areas Needing Stronger Alignment- strengthen the alignment between curricular, instructional, assessment, and organizational conditions and practices. Building on the School’s Strengths- continue to establish and build on the school’s strengths, establishing a firm foundation for future strengths. Addressing Limitations and Areas in Need of Improvement- addressing and understanding areas in need of improvement. The information gleaned from this study along with the student performance data will be used to formulate the school’s action plan.

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Capacity of Stewart County High School’s Collaboration (4.1) There is documentation of collaboration between the administration, the staff and other stakeholders in this school to support student learning. The Teacher Survey revealed numerous methods of collaboration between administrators and teachers to support student learning as documented by the survey and illustrated below. Collaboration With Administration 33% Assist with individual student concerns or behaviors 16% Facilitate meetings between teachers and parents 15% Assist with making home contacts 37% Faculty meetings 33% School Improvement Meetings All teachers felt collaboration exists between themselves and the administration in the areas of faculty meetings and school improvements meetings. The majority of teachers also felt a strong collaboration effort in the area of assisting with student behavior concerns and problems. Many teachers also involved the administration in meetings with parents and making home contacts. This indicates willingness by the administration to be involved in collaboration with teachers in these areas. The Effective School Survey 2005-06 also identifies several areas where collaboration to support student learning is strong and some areas needing to be strengthened. The percentages indicate student/teacher collaboration and student/student collaboration are taking place. When questioned if students were given the time, help and encouragement necessary to learn the following were the survey results:    

67% of parents agree students are given the time, help and encouragement necessary to learn. 97% of teachers agree students are given the time, help and encouragement necessary to learn. 45% of students agree students are given the time, help and encouragement necessary to learn. 45% of support staff agrees students are given the time, help and encouragement necessary to learn.

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90% of teachers also agree students work together to help each other learn indicating a great collaboration between students.

As stated above from the Teacher Survey, the teachers indicate a high level of collaboration between themselves and the administration. This is also indicated by the results Effective Schools Survey when asked of the parents, students and support staff. The results of the survey are:       

56% of parents agree the building principal supports his teachers. 87% of teachers agree the building principal supports his teachers. 48% of students agree the building principal supports his teachers. 76% of support staff agree the building principal supports his teachers. 38% of parents agree the principal is a facilitator or coordinator of change. 76% of teachers agree the principal is a facilitator or coordinator of change. 78% of support staff agrees the principal is a facilitator or coordinator of change.

Further… 85% of teachers and 71% of support staff agree that staff members are encouraged to share ideas and to work together to improve the instructional program.

In the area of school/home collaboration it is interesting to note that:  While 79% of parents and 74% of teachers agree that parent involvement in the school benefits student learning  Only 36% of parents agree school leaders work with parents to establish procedures to guide parent involvement while 39% disagree. However:  46% of teachers agree school leaders work with parents to establish procedures to guide parent involvement.  And 58% of support staff agree. Closer in agreement are the parents and teachers in the area of school activity collaboration:  Only 34% of parents agree that staff involves parents in selecting, evaluating, and revising school activities while 39% disagree.  41% of teachers agree that staff involves parents in selecting, evaluating, and revising school activities.  The majority of support staff responded “don’t know”. 90

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Conclusion: Collaboration of the administration and instructional staff and other stakeholders to support student learning in the area of Opportunity to Learn/Time on Task was rated a strength by all stakeholders with the exception of students who only agreed by 44% that they are given the time, help and encouragement necessary to learn. See note. Note: Though only 44% of students agree with the survey question, this is near the highest percentage of consensus among students on any question. Instructional Leadership is perceived by parents, teachers, and support staff as being strong with the exception again of the students who only agreed by 54%. Again, this is the highest percentage of consensus among students on any question polled. Other areas where collaboration efforts are evident at Stewart County High School are:  Tutoring (before and after school)  Guidance  Consultive services  Library/Computer lab  Extracurricular activities (sports, Career Technical Student Organizations, academic organizations, social organizations)

According to the Effective Schools Survey results in 2005-06, Home-School Relations is cited as the area of weakness that SCHS may want to improve upon particularly in the areas of establishing procedures to guide parent involvement and involving parents in selecting, evaluating and revising school activities.

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Analysis of the Decision Making Process (4.2) In evaluating the decision making structure of Stewart County High School, several data sources were utilized. An Effective Schools Survey was administered to Stewart County High School faculty, students, parents, staff, and community members seeking their perception of school-decision making. An open-ended survey was developed and administered to teachers at Stewart County High School for their perceptions on the decision making process. Other data includes a list of other ways input is garnered for decision making at Stewart County High School. On the Teacher Survey question was asked of teachers. “In looking at this school’s organizational structure for decision making, please note strengths and limitations. (Some examples may include: encouraged to share ideas, leadership is distributed among staff members, etc.)”. Of the 37 teacher surveys collected at Stewart County High School the following results were found:  56% of teachers believe we have shared decision making at Stewart County High School. They feel free to share ideas, suggestions, and feel the administration supports this dialogue.  38% of teachers believe decision making is shared at Stewart County High School but have some concerns about the decisionmaking process. Details of the areas of concern are included later.  3% of teachers believe the decision making process of Stewart County High School is not shared.  3% of teachers indicated they did not know if decision making was shared at Stewart County High School. Strengths Among teachers’ responses to the survey question on decision-making within our school, strengths included were:  20% of all teachers mentioned faculty advisory committee as being a strength in our decision making process. Our faculty advisory committee is comprised of representatives from all school departments that meet to discuss teacher concerns and help decide on school policy.  Teachers also mention that many feel they are encouraged to voice ideas and suggestions. 41% of all teachers who answered the survey felt the administration encouraged ideas and feedback.  Other strengths mentioned were the fact that faculty serves on various committees and therefore has input on many facets of school decisions and this allows shared leadership.  Administration had an open door policy. 92

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Areas to Strengthen The issues that teachers identified as areas of concern had to do with administration, the change process within our school, shared leadership within the building, and outside controls of decision making within the school. The subjects under administration that were identified most often in surveys as needing attention included:  Lack of communication by administration to faculty  Possible restructuring of administrative duties, such as more formalized department heads that handle more administrative functions and are compensated positions, a fulltime Athletic Director, or an additional administrative person to ease the burden on current administration The change process within our building or the way decisions by the faculty and administration are handled also came up as areas of concern in the survey. Teachers indicated they feel free to bring up ideas and to offer input but the input is often not utilized. Survey results indicated:  Teachers feel often decisions made are not implemented.  Subjects brought up for discussion are often discussed but then dropped before a decision is made.  Teacher ideas are not given serious consideration. The area of shared leadership within the building was also a highly noted issue. Some teachers had concerns about how leadership is distributed within the building. Areas included:  The need for other stakeholders to be included in the decision making process within the school. Survey results indicated teachers felt a need for parental, community or student involvement rather than only teachers and school administration making decisions.  Teachers indicated a lack of feedback from Faculty Advisory meetings or doubted its’ effectiveness in decision making. Many felt it was too limited in scope and was unsure if their views were being represented.  Some indicated they felt elected members needed to be chosen on a regular basis rather than serving an indefinite term.  Many teachers indicated they felt leadership within the building consisted of relatively few people who held all leadership roles.

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Analysis of the Resource Allocation of Stewart County High School (4.3) This section describes the school’s overall resources including materials, human resources, and funding sources with a connection to school improvement. A listing of Stewart County High School’s 2005-06 available human resources and general fund monetary resources is included. Data for these listings were derived from Jamie Bogard, Payroll Manager; Sally Mathews, SCHS Accountant; Chris Guynn, SCHS Principal; and the extended contract handbook. Listing of Current Available Human Resources Expenditure Certified Staff Support Staff Custodial Staff Food Service Extended Contracts Parent Volunteers Community Volunteers TOTAL

Number (when relevant) Total Dollars (costs) 47 1,870,064 7 94,126 6 78,714 10 97,264 15 15,000

2,155,168

Listing of Current Available General Fund Monetary Resources 2005-06 Expenditure Technology Budget Picture Income Soda Machine Income (last year’s totals) BEP Budget Concessions from athletics (10%--last year’s totals) Pay phone (last year’s total) Wal Mart (donation) Interest (last year’s total) Target (donation) TOTAL

Total Dollars 4,000 6,500 6,474 8,200 702 122.50 250 1,361.50 88 27,698

Discussion of Utilization of Current Resources In the survey sent to Stewart County High School’s teachers, the question, “Describe how school resources are being used, adequately or inadequately, including materials, human resources, funding, etc.” was asked. The following results and comments were derived from the survey question: 94

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67% said their funding needs were adequately met in their classrooms  Basic materials needed for a quality education are available  School resources are adequate to meet the instructional goals for the programs  Resources are being used to benefit the teachers and the students  Have not been turned down for things that are needed  This is an area of strength  More than adequate resources are available for teachers and students  Students are consistently exposed to many student resources  Materials are fully utilized and shared between departments 8% felt like there was inadequate funding  More computer technology across the curriculum  Math lab is not adequately maintained; cannot be used effectively  More funding in the GATEWAY and ACT areas of curriculum  More focus on curriculum and instruction less focus on athletics  Building and equipment maintenance is slow and sometimes not existent 5% did not know how to answer the question due to lack of knowledge of the budget 20% did not answer the question REGARDING SCHOOL RESOURCES—HUMAN RESOURCES: 39% felt there was adequate use of human resources  Addition of new School Resource Officer has proven valuable  Little wasted time  HR fully utilized through collaboration 25% felt there was inadequate use of human resources  Permanent substitutes not used adequately  Assistant and copier not fully utilized  Some teachers not using full abilities  Teachers should not be asked to cover classes when there are assistants available  Work load among support staff not equally divided

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Stewart County High School received 15 extended contracts to be distributed as follows:  Seven—Remediation (Tutoring and Homework)  Four—Summer Remediation (Credit Recovery)  Four—Saturday School (Also can be before and after school detention/tutoring) According to state guidelines, “From the annual review the committee shall establish in priority order the student needs to be addressed by ELP activities, related goal(s) from system and/or school plans, measurable objectives, and proposed activities. High priority student needs shall have the following characteristics: a. be supported by data b. be listed in rank order c. become the basis for the program proposal Using these guidelines, Stewart County High School extended contracts were distributed. According to the 2004 No Child Left Behind results for Stewart County High School the graduation rate was not met. After reviewing data from past student drop-outs and identifying “at-risk” behaviors, counselors, teachers, administrators, parents, and students are working together to alleviate this problem and raise the graduation rate. The use of the “credit recovery” extended contracts is a portion of this program. On the 2005 No Child Left Behind report, Stewart County High School met the graduation rate. Continuing to support our students through the “credit recovery” and remediation extended contracts will help us continue to target this area of concern. The addition of a full-time, licensed teacher working in In-School Suspension in conjunction with the four “detention/tutoring” extended contracts help keep students who are already an attendance issue in the school during the regular school day. In the 2004-2005 school year Stewart County High School had 74 suspensions. By using these extended contracts as a part of the student punishment, suspensions were cut down to eight. The addition of a new homework policy, requiring before/after school detention, is another opportunity to use the “detention/tutoring” contracts. Students are provided much needed academic assistance at the same time as the punishment. The seven additional tutoring contracts are intended to enhance the student test scores in Math, English, Science and on the ACT and offer the service of enrichment and remediation in all areas to ALL Stewart County high School students.

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Extended contracts are used to continue to improve learning through effective instructional and organizational design and to increase student achievement at all levels. Stewart County High School did not have any deficiencies on the state report card or on the No Child Left Behind report for the 2005-2006 school year. Data was evaluated from the Effective Schools Survey 05-06 students, parents and support staff sections regarding the use of resources. Questions asked of these stakeholders pertained to the basic upkeep of the building and the use of parents and community volunteers as human resources. A majority of each of these groups felt the school is kept clean and when something in the school is broken it is fixed quickly. The parents and support staff were asked if parents and community volunteers play an active role in the school’s program and they both overwhelmingly agreed they do. The Connection of Resource Usage to School Improvement In conclusion, the connection of resource usage to school improvement at Stewart County High School can be summed up as financial resources are appropriately allocated and utilized to enhance the performance of our students. Based on our recent state report card, student scores increased in all the areas of tutoring for which extended contracts are delegated validating the distribution of those contracts. In addition, the majority of teachers declare they are provided the materials or the resources to get the materials they need to run their classrooms and provide their students a proper education. Summary of Resources Strengths and Limitations Strengths Monetary allocations for classroom supplies and materials Use of extended contracts Current School Resource Officer’s visibility and involvement in school activities

Limitations Usage of human resources in the area of support staff Open computer labs Use of human resources for upkeep and maintenance of building

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Curriculum Analysis and Support (4.4) Currently all teachers at Stewart County High School have state standards and benchmarks as the basis for their curriculum. At a faculty meeting on November 15, 2006, teachers were asked to bring their current curriculum with them and it was checked and all was current. Most of the teachers had downloaded their current curriculum from the state website. Every teacher is required to have daily lesson plans with the state standard identified. These are reviewed by the principal. Vocational teachers keep their curriculum current by using the latest competency profiles as provided by the State Department of Education. Teachers are required to complete competency profiles on each student at the end of the each semester. Those are turned in to the vocational director who forwards them to the state department at the end of the school year. Textbook adoption is based on the state textbook adoption list increasing the support of the state curriculum. New textbooks are purchased for courses each time they are up for adoption. There is alignment between SCHS and the middle school particularly in the math area and less formally in the English area. The high school math teachers send a placement test to the middle school math teachers and ask for placement recommendations by the middle school teachers based on personal knowledge of the students. The English teachers receive informal recommendations by the middle school teachers through conversations, interviews and receiving recommendation lists for advanced placement. Advanced curriculum has recently been added by offering students the opportunity to take college courses online. Eighteen students have taken advantage of this opportunity during the 2006-07 school year. Articulation agreements between the vocational departments and post secondary institutions are in place. The Information Technology Department has agreements with Nashville State Community College and Jackson State Community College. The vocational cosmetology has various articulation with area beauty colleges to accept completed hours. Stewart County High School mapping was last completed in 2000 and may need to be updated. Continuous monitoring and adjusting takes place in the areas where Gateway, TCAP Writing Assessment and end of course testing takes place. As those 98

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scores are received teachers are involved in staff development activities to analyze scores and areas of strengths and weaknesses and adjust curriculum accordingly. While a formal approach to ACT analysis is not as evident, some teachers do review old ACT test material to make sure they are including those standards in their instruction. The college students we interviewed suggested more curriculum in the areas of business. Stewart County High Schools teachers all use the latest curriculum as provided by the state. Our textbooks are purchased frequently as suggested on the state’s rotating schedule of textbook adoption. These are areas of strength at Stewart County High School. We also are proud to offer college level courses to our junior and senior students as a way of advanced placement for them. Areas of limitation in curriculum include lack of formal coordination between the high school and middle school in placing students. The lack of upkeep of the mapping process is also a limitation.

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Instructional Analysis and Support (4.5) To analyze and process Instructional Analysis and Support, several teacher surveys were distributed to research the areas of instructional and adaptation strategies, utilization of class time, systems of monitoring and adjusting, and a questionnaire pertaining to professional curriculum support. The Effective Schools Survey of 2005-2006 was also evaluated and areas pertinent to Instructional Analysis and Support were incorporated into the research data. Stewart County High School offers several programs to enhance instruction. Established programs include:  a new teacher mentoring program  on-line courses  an At Risk program targeting potential dropout students  a Credit Recovery program The Teacher Survey identified instructional strategies utilized at Stewart County High School. Cooperative learning was found to be incorporated by a large percentage (93%) of stakeholders. Lecture and guided practice/modeling are also prevalent. Instructional Strategies Cooperative Learning Lecture Guided Practice/Modeling Class Discussion Written/Oral Testing Peer Tutoring Independent Study Portfolios/Notebooks Technology Individual/Group Presentations Critical Thinking Activities Review Games Student Research/Projects Reading Assignments Lab Rubrics Integrated Curriculum Assignments Mastery Learning Role Playing Video Presentations Performance/Problem Based

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Percentage 93 90 90 86 86 76 76 76 69 66 66 66 62 59 48 48 45 45 45 41 41

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Learning Simulation Professional Presentations Discovery Learning Team Building Story Telling Resource Personnel Critiques Checklists for Particular Topic Debates Field Trips

41 38 34 31 31 31 28 28 24 21

The college students interviewed indicated more projects, individual and group, interviews, and more presentations used as instructional strategies would have been helpful in preparing them for their college experiences. In the 2005-2006 Effective Schools Survey, a composite of 73% of stakeholders viewed this school to provide many ways to help ALL students learn. A composite of 82 % of stakeholders agreed that each year ALL students are expected to learn. Regarding adaptation strategies utilized by SCHS faculty, extended time on task seems to be commonly incorporated. Other adaptation strategies extensively utilized include:  retaking test  modifications according to IEP  make-up missed assignments  progress reports  extended time on test  peer tutoring  re-teaching Adaptation Strategies Extended Time on Task Progress Reports Make-up Missed Assignments Extended Time on Test Peer Tutoring Modifications According to IEP Provide Copies of Notes Reteaching Re-do Assignments Before-After School Tutoring Re-take Test Extra Credit

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Percentage 83 79 79 76 69 69 69 69 66 66 62 62

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Study Guide Alternate Seating Arrangement Individual Instruction Extra Assistance Use of Calculator Testing Modifications Require Notebooks Alternate/Modified Assignments Oral Testing Modify Grading Scale Extra Grade Opportunities Word Processor Behavior Contracting Differientiated Projects Assignment Book Highlighted Textbook Compacting

59 59 55 55 52 52 52 48 34 34 31 24 21 21 10 7 3

When questioned about their monitoring and adjusting techniques, surveyed responses indicate 93% of the teachers noted testing and review for testing as the leading tool of monitoring and adjusting to best meet the needs of the students. This finding also indicated the second most common area utilized at 90% is re-teaching and parental contact. Other strategies employed by the classroom teachers are indicated in the chart below. System of Monitoring and Adjusting Testing Review for Test Re-teaching Parental Contact Guided Questioning Regular Progress Reports Providing Notes IEP Checklist Homework Seating Arrangement Guided Practice Peer Tutoring Extra Credit Extra Time Verbal/Nonverbal Questions Tutoring Hands-on Projects Different Testing Styles

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Percentage 97 93 90 90 83 83 83 83 79 79 76 72 72 66 62 59 55 52

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Additional Assessment Use of Advisory

41 41

Perhaps this is a reflection of 79% of the stakeholders in viewing Stewart County High School as a school that provides many ways to help all students to learn. (EES, 2003-2004) The professionalism of teachers at Stewart County High School is also evident. Professional Development opportunities are diverse and are held system-wide as well as directed building level. Independent professional development or optional professional development is encouraged and supported by the administration. Select faculty members are required to attend state-mandated professional development. A teacher questionnaire regarding professional development/curriculum support indicates 90% are members of professional organizations and 75% attended curriculum-related conferences or seminars within the past year. A strong 68% have attained advanced degrees beyond Bachelors or are currently working on an advanced degree. In conclusion, strengths in the area of instruction include a variety of programs, high expectations for student achievement, wide variety of adaptation strategies and systems of monitoring and adjusting and a professional, highly educated staff. An area to improve may be to increase our expectations of students in the performance based instructional strategies.

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Summary and Concluding Statements for Component 4—Curricular, Instructional, Assessment, and Organizational Effectiveness The goal of this section of the plan is to target those areas of capacity-building that can make the greatest difference in improving student learning at Stewart County High School. This analysis of the instructional and organizational effectiveness is to identify our strengths and limitations and determine how we can best build on these strengths and address the areas of limitations in the development of the school improvement plan. In our analysis the following conclusions were made regarding areas of strengths and limitations: Collaboration: Stewart County High School administration, instructional staff and other stakeholders collaborate in areas that support student learning. Instructional leadership is strong and administration is involved in collaborating with teachers in area of parental contact and discipline. A variety of collaborative efforts are ongoing at Stewart County High School in the area of direct student learning, extra curricular activities, sports and social activities. Teachers go above and beyond the call of their regular duties to assist students with tutoring and other projects. An area of limitation in collaboration is in parental involvement in school activities. Decision-making Process: Stewart County High School teachers feel they have the opportunity to voice their opinions and have shared decision making and feel these are strengths of the school. However, they indicate as a limitation that once these decisions are made they are often not implemented. An additional limitation was lack of communication by administration to faculty. Resource Allocation: Stewart County High School makes exemplary use of its monetary resource allocation. Teachers and other stakeholders feel they have the resources and materials needed to adequately support their classrooms. 104

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The limitation noted in the area of resources is with human resources and the use and supervision of support staff, particularly teacher assistants. Curriculum Analysis and Support: Up-to-date curriculum and textbooks are areas of strength for Stewart County High School. Giving our students the opportunity for advanced placement in college by offering on-line college courses is another strength of our program. A lack of formal coordination between the middle school and high school teachers in placing students and the lack of upkeep of our mapping are limitations. A formal analysis of ACT standards being taught is not present.

Instructional Analysis and Support: Strengths in the area of instruction include a variety of programs, high expectations for student achievement, wide variety of adaptation strategies and systems of monitoring and adjusting and a professional, highly educated staff. An area to improve is to increase our expectations of students in the performance based instructional strategies. A formal analysis of ACT teaching practices is not fully implemented.

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Section 5 Development of the Action Plan Chairperson Penny Parsons, Math Members Paul Berry, Cosmetology Loretta Craig, Guidance Mike Craig, Social Studies/vice-principal Becky Grasty, Math Chris Guynn, Principal Rita Hargis, English Susan Smith, Special Education

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Section 5: Development of the Action Plan Narrative Description of the Process In developing the action plan for the coming year, this committee reviewed the previous sections and discussed the information thoroughly. After examining the current level of student performance and considering the organizational and instructional effectiveness of the school, the team determined several possible areas to address in the action plan. Areas considered were ACT Composite scores, ACT Core scores, TCAP Writing Assessment scores, parent involvement, and TVAAS scores with regards to the Gateway Tests. Using a cooperative learning activity, these areas were charted and studied to determine measurability, student focus, academic focus, feasibility, linkage to local, state and national goals and the school’s organizational and instructional readiness to work toward specific goals in these areas. Since the ACT Cores scores are components of the ACT Composite scores, it was determine to focus on the ACT Composite scores as a whole. It was also decided that parent involvement would be contained within the other goals without addressing it separately. Collected data indicated a need for improvement in the ACT Composite scores, TCAP Writing Assessment scores, and the TVAAS scores with regard to the Gateway Tests. After faculty discussion, these areas were made the focus of the Action Plan for 2007-08. The following pages include the plans for improving target areas and other related elements. In addition to information connecting the goals to other parts of SIP and local, state and national goals, plans for evaluation are also discussed. Also included is a summary of professional development activities supporting these goals and a plan to evaluate the extent of implementation, impact on student performance and improvement in organizational and instructional effectiveness.

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5.11 Improving ACT Composite Scores Plan Target Area (Goal): Students’ ACT Composite scores will increase. Student Performance Standard: Students will achieve an average ACT Composite score of 21.5 or better. Belief Statement: Instructional decisions shall ensure that curriculum is relevant and assessment is a continuous process. Mission Statement: The mission of SCHS is to provide a safe, positive, and diverse educational environment in which students at all academic levels can attain the knowledge and skills necessary to become productive citizens. School System’s 5-Year Goal: Improve learning through effective instructional and organizational design. State Board of Education Policy: All high school students will achieve worldclass standards. School Profile/Data: The local ACT Composite average has fallen below the state and national Act Composite averages. Students are not achieving the needed 21.0 ACT Composite score to be granted the Hope Scholarship. Expectations/Results/Objectives: Improvements in the students’ average ACT Composite scores will increase to 21.5 or better by May 2008. Goal Evaluation: Compare the local average ACT Composite to the state and national averages and to the projected average of 21.5. Next Steps: Check completion and progress of each action step. If goal is not met, new action steps and modifications of existing steps will be made. Long-Term Goal: The local ACT Composite scores will reach 21.5 or better.

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5.21 & 5.31 Improving ACT Composite Scores Action Step/ Strategy/Intervention

Timeline

Required Resources

Person(s) Responsible

Curriculum and Instruction

Communication

Professional Development

Action Step Assessment

Mr. Guynn & Loretta Craig Committee

Increase students’ mathematical skills.

Present to faculty in meeting

Committee

Increase the number of students eligible for the Hope Scholarship.

Teachers will be made knowledgeable of the policy and the implementation process.

Publish in teacher handbook

Track ACT scores after the administration of the ACT Test for students who scored 21.5 or better.

Publish in student handbook and pre-registration bulletin.

Survey Data from parents, students and teachers

Require all students to earn 4 Mathematic Credits beginning with the Class of 2011.    

  



 



Appoint Committee Develop draft policy Present to faculty Obtain BOE approval and make policy changes

April 20,2007

Inform students of policy changes Inform parents at Freshman Orientation Publish policy in teacher and student handbook and pre-registration bulletin Replace part time mathematics teacher position with full time mathematics teacher position Implement policy Collect and analyze ACT Composite Scores Administer evaluation survey

Aug. 1, 2007

May 15, 2007 May 20, 2007

Time for committee work on Policy revisions $0

July 1, 2007

Aug. 1, 2007

Aug. 1, 2007

Aug. 1, 2007

Aug. 1, 2007 Jan.1-15, 2008

May 15, 2008

Funding for full time teaching position to replace part time teaching position $25000

Mr. Guynn, Section 5 Members and Developmental Committee Mr. Guynn Faculty & Mr. Guynn

Mr. Guynn

Mr. Guynn

Faculty Loretta Craig & Janey Marshall

Loretta Craig & Janey Marshall

109

Present Policy at Freshman Orientation

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Improving ACT Composite Scores Continued………. Action Step/ Strategy/Intervention

Timeline

Required Resources

Person(s) Responsible

Curriculum and Instruction

Communication

Professional Development

Action Step Assessment

Time for committee work on Policy revisions $0

Mr. Guynn & Loretta Craig Committee

Increase students’ science skills.

Present to faculty in meeting

Committee

Increase the number of students eligible for the Hope Scholarship.

Teachers will be made knowledgeable of the policy and the implementation process.

Publish in teacher handbook

Track ACT scores after the administration of the ACT Test for students who scored 21.5 or better.

Publish in student handbook and pre-registration bulletin.

Survey Data from parents, students and teachers

Require all Dual and University Path students to earn 4 Science Credits beginning with the Class of 2011.    

  

 



Appoint Committee Develop draft policy Present to faculty Obtain BOE approval and make policy changes

April 20,2007

Inform students of policy changes Inform parents at Freshman Orientation Publish policy in teacher and student handbook and pre-registration bulletin Implement policy Collect and analyze ACT Composite Scores Administer evaluation survey

Aug. 1, 2007

Continue Math and Science tutoring before and after school and on Saturdays.

May 15, 2007 May 20, 2007 July 1, 2007

Mr. Guynn, Section 5 Members and Developmental Committee Mr. Guynn Faculty & Mr. Guynn

Aug. 1, 2007

Mr. Guynn

Aug. 1, 2007

Aug. 1, 2007 Jan.1-15, 2008

Faculty Loretta Craig & Janey Marshall

May 15, 2008

Loretta Craig & Janey Marshall

Aug. 1, 2007

Present Policy at Freshman Orientation

Up to 10 Extended Contracts $10,000

Math and Science teachers

110

Improve students’ skills in the Core ACT Components.

Inform students through the school newsletter, website, and during registration.

Inform teacher of the tutoring available to students.

Track ACT scores after the administration of the ACT Test for students who scored 21.5 or better.

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Improving ACT Composite Scores Continued……… Action Step/ Strategy/Intervention

Timeline

Required Resources

Person(s) Responsible

Curriculum and Instruction

Communication

Professional Development

Action Step Assessment

Time for committee work on Policy revisions $0

Mr. Guynn & Loretta Craig Committee

Improve students’ skills in the Core ACT Components.

Present to faculty in meeting

Teachers will be made knowledgeable of the policy and the implementation process.

Track ACT scores after the administration of the ACT Test for students who scored 21.5 or better.

Require all Dual and University Path students to take an ACT Prep Course in their Junior year beginning with the Class of 2011.    

    

 



Appoint Committee Develop draft policy Present to faculty Obtain BOE approval and make policy changes Appoint a curriculum committee Adopt a curriculum Inform students of policy changes Inform parents at Freshman Orientation Publish policy in teacher and student handbook and pre-registration bulletin Implement policy Collect and analyze ACT Composite Scores Administer evaluation survey

Continue ACT Prep Computer Program before school.

April 20,2007 May 15, 2007 May 20, 2007 July 1, 2007

April 20, 2007

May 15, 2007 Aug. 1, 2007

Aug. 1, 2007

Aug. 1, 2007

Committee Mr. Guynn, Section 5 Members and Developmental Committee

Time for curriculum committee to evaluate software and materials. and visit schools with successful Act Prep Course in Place. ?$ Purchase Curriculum ?$

Train ACT Prep Teachers.

Survey Data from parents, students and teachers

Curriculum Committee Faculty & Mr. Guynn

Mr. Guynn

Mr. Guynn

Faculty Loretta Craig & Janey Marshall

May 15, 2008

Loretta Craig & Janey Marshall

Act Prep Computer Program. (Previously purchased) $0 Up to 4 Extended Contracts $4,000

Publish in teacher handbook Publish in student handbook and pre-registration bulletin.

Mr. Guynn

Aug. 1, 2007 Jan.1-15, 2008

Aug. 1, 2007May 1, 2008

Increase the number of students eligible for the Hope Scholarship.

Present Policy at Freshman Orientation

Connie Baggett

111

Improve students’ skills in the Core ACT Components.

Inform students through the school newsletter, website, and during registration.

Inform teachers of the ACT Prep Computer Program.

Track ACT scores after the administration of the ACT Test for students who scored 21.5 or better.

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Improving ACT Composite Scores Continued……… Action Step/ Strategy/Intervention

Timeline

Required Resources

Person(s) Responsible

Curriculum and Instruction

Communication

Professional Development

Action Step Assessment

Mr. Guynn & Loretta Craig Mr. Guynn & Loretta Craig

Assist with students’ placement in courses.

Present to faculty in meeting

Teachers will be made aware of the testing policy.

Track ACT scores after the administration of the ACT Test for students who scored 21.5 or better.

th

Require all 8 grade students to take the “Explore” and require all 10th grade Dual and University Path students to take the “Plan”  Present to faculty  Present Proposal to and retain approval from Middle School Administration and Central Office Personnel  Inform parents and students via mail  Inform parents at Freshman Orientation  Publish in teacher and student handbook and pre-registration bulletin  Administer the “Explore” and “Plan” tests.  Explain and evaluate test results with students and parents during registration and Freshman Orientation.  Use the “Explore” results in placement and planning students 4 year coursework  Use the “plan” for instructional decisions  Collect and analyze ACT Composite Scores

Increase and promote ACT Library Materials

April 20,2007

Time to administer tests $0

May 15, 2007 Time to plan with teachers and evaluate tests $0

Aug. 1, 2007

Aug. 1, 2007

Aug. 1, 2007

Funding for “Explore” tests $1300 Funding for “Plan” tests $1200

Assist with students’ path of study.

Mr. Guynn,

Mr. Guynn & Faculty

With better placement of students, students will increase skills that will in turn increase ACT Composite scores.

Publish in teacher handbook Publish in student handbook and pre-registration bulletin.

Teachers will be made knowledgeable of the testing usages.

Use school messenger. Send letters to parents.

Mr. Guynn

Postage for letters to parents $200

Loretta Craig & Janey Marshall

Jan. 15, 2008

April 1- Aug. 1, 2008

Loretta Craig & Janey Marshall

April 1- Aug. 1, 2008

Loretta Craig & Janey Marshall

Jan.1-15, 2008

Loretta Craig & Janey Marshall

May 15, 2008

Loretta Craig & Janey Marshall

Aug. 1, 2007May 20, 2008

Time to organize materials and prepare presentation. $0 Purchase additional ACT materials. 400$

Lora Black

112

Improve students’ skills in the Core ACT Components.

Inform students through the school newsletter, website, and librarian presentations to classes.

Teachers will be made knowledgeable ACT Library Materials.

Track ACT scores after the administration of the ACT Test for students who scored 21.5 or better.

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Improving ACT Composite Scores Continued……… Action Step/ Strategy/Intervention

Require all English student to take weekly ACT vocabulary tests.  Present to English Teachers  Obtain ACT Vocabulary  Implement ACT vocabulary tests in English classes  Collect and analyze ACT Composite Scores  Administer evaluation survey

Continue and Implement the Accelerated Math Program in all Algebra I Classes.

Timeline

May 20,2007

May 20, 2007 Aug. 1, 2007

Required Resources

Person(s) Responsible

Curriculum and Instruction

Communication

Professional Development

Action Step Assessment

ACT Vocabulary List $0

Mr. Guynn

Increase students’ ACT Vocabulary.

Present to English Department

Mr. Guynn

Increase the number of students eligible for the Hope Scholarship.

English teachers will sequence the ACT vocabulary In each English class.

Track ACT scores after the administration of the ACT Test for students who scored 21.5 or better.

Time for English teachers to sequence the ACT vocabulary In each English class.

Jan.1-15, 2008

Loretta Craig & Janey Marshall

May 15, 2008

Aug. 1, 2007May 20, 2008

English Teachers

Math Department

Increase students’ mathematical skills. Improve students’ skills in the Core ACT Components.

Teachers will be made knowledgeable of the Accelerated Math program. Students will be informed once enrolled in Algebra I.

113

Survey Data from parents, students and teachers

Students will be informed once enrolled in each English class.

Loretta Craig & Janey Marshall

Time to install the Accelerated Math Program and train teachers. $0

Teachers will be made knowledgeable of the ACT Vocabulary Testing.

Math Teachers will be trained to use the Accelerated Math Program.

Track ACT scores after the administration of the ACT Test for students who scored 21.5 or better.

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Improving ACT Composite Scores Continued……… Action Step/ Strategy/Intervention

Timeline

Implement the Plato Program as a tutorial or enrichment for Math, Science and English before and after school, on Saturday during the school year, and during Credit Recovery Program in the summer.

Aug. 1, 2007

Implement an after school review session the week prior to the administration of the ACT for juniors and seniors.

October 2007 Nov/Dec 2007 February 2008 April 2008

Required Resources

Person(s) Responsible

Time to develop program using Plato and train teachers. $0

Math, Science, and English Departments

Curriculum and Instruction

Communication

Professional Development

Action Step Assessment

Improve students’ skills in the Core ACT Components.

Teachers will be made knowledgeable of the Plato tutorial and enrichment program.

Train teachers to use the Plato Program

Track ACT scores after the administration of the ACT Test for students who scored 21.5 or better.

Teachers will be trained to teach concepts covered by the ACT.

Track ACT scores after the administration of the ACT Test for students who scored 21.5 or better.

Increase the number of students eligible for the Hope Scholarship.

Up to 10 Extended Contracts $10,000

Time to develop the review materials prior to implementing. $100

Mr. Guynn

Improve students’ skills in the Core ACT Components. Increase the number of students eligible for the Hope Scholarship.

Extended Contract $1000

114

Inform students through the school newsletter, website, and during registration.

Teachers will be made knowledgeable of the ACT review sessions. Inform students through the school newsletter, website, and during registration.

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Improving ACT Composite Scores Continued……… Action Step/ Strategy/Intervention

Implement more rigorous curriculum through offering an Honors Diploma.

Timeline

Required Resources

Person(s) Responsible

Curriculum and Instruction

Communication

Professional Development

Action Step Assessment

Aug. 1, 2007

Time to develop course criteria for Honors Diploma $0

Mr. Guynn, FAC, and Guidance.

Improve students’ skills in the Core ACT Components.

Teachers will be made knowledgeable of the Honors Diploma program.

Teachers will be made knowledgeable of the Honors Diploma and of the set criteria for obtaining it.

Track ACT scores after the administration of the ACT Test for students who scored 21.5 or better.

Increase the number of students eligible for the Hope Scholarship.

115

Inform students through the school newsletter, website, and during registration.

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

A. Plan for Evaluating the Extent of Implementation of the School Improvement Plan: 

Monthly meetings with responsible persons to review timelines and progress towards completion of identified steps

B. Plan for Evaluating the Target Area Goals for Student Learning:  

Analysis of the average ACT Composite upon each test administration Analysis of average ACT Composite of each grade

C. Plan for Documenting Improvement in Instructional Effectiveness: 

Track ACT scores after the administration of the ACT Test for students who scored 21.5 or better.

116

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

5.12 Improving TCAP Writing Assessment Scores Plan Target Area (Goal): Students will have the knowledge and skills to write at a “Competent” or better skill level as determined by the 11th grade TCAP Writing Assessment. Student Performance Standard: Students will achieve an average score of 4.25 or better on the 11th grade TCAP Writing Assessment by the 11th grade year. Value-added gains will occur for all students. Belief Statement: Students should be proficient in verbal and non-verbal communication. Instructional decisions shall ensure that the curriculum is relevant and assessment is a continuous process. Mission Statement: Our mission is to provide a safe, positive, and diverse educational environment in which students at all academic levels can attain the knowledge and skills necessary to become productive citizens. School System’s 5-Year Goal: Improve learning through effective instructional and organizational design. State Board of Education Policy: All high school students will achieve world-class standards. Student Perform Data: A significant number of students were consistently scoring at or below a score of 4 (Competent) over the last several years making the 3 year average of 3.9. TVAAS data also indicates insufficient gain in the upper quintiles for 2006. Expectations/Results/Objectives: By the Spring of 2008, value-add gains will be seen in all quintiles. More students will score on an average of 4.25 or better on the TCAP Writing Assessment by the 11th grade year. Goal Evaluation: Compare writing scores to the three previous years looking for an increase in the number of students scoring on an average of 4.25 or better. Assess gains across quintiles for writing. Next Steps: Check completion and progress of each action step. If goal is met, continue to monitor progress to assure scores continue. If the methodology of this action plan is successful, it may be applied to science areas. If goal is not met, each action step will be evaluated to determine effectiveness and extent of implementation. New or modified steps will be added to the plan. Long-Term Goal: Local student performance on writing assessments will be an average above a 4.25 (Competent). Value-added scores will consistently show a gain.

117

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

5.22 and 5.32 Improving TCAP Writing Assessment Scores Action Step/ Strategy/Intervention

Require all English Students to submit a book report each quarter.  Present to English Teachers  Develop a list of approved books for each English class offered.  Develop a schoolwide standard guidelines for book report  Implement policy

Require all English students to write a term/research paper.  Present to English Teachers  Develop a schoolwide standard format for term/research papers.  Approve a set of writing guidelines and writing form for each English class.  Implement policy

Require all English students to write four prompt papers following the format of the TCAP Writing Assessment and grade by the State rubric.  Present to English Teachers  Obtain the TCAP Writing Assessment format and state grading rubric.  Implement policy

Timeline

May 2007 May-Aug. 1, 2007

May-Aug. 1, 2007 Aug. 1, 2007

May 2007 May-Aug. 1, 2007

May-Aug. 1, 2007

Required Resources/ Projected Costs

Person(s) Responsible

Curriculum and Instruction

Communication

Professional Development

Action Step Assessment

Time to develop list of approved books for each English class. $0

Chris Guynn

Develop students’ writing skills through reading.

Present to faculty in meeting

English teachers will present the school-wide standard guidelines for book reports to faculty.

Analyze TCAP Writing Scores.

English teachers will present the school-wide format for term/research papers to faculty.

Analyze TCAP Writing Scores.

English teachers will be trained in grading writing using a state rubric.

Analyze TCAP Writing Scores.

Time to develop standard guidelines for book report. $0

Time to develop standard guidelines for book report. $0

Aug. 1, 2007

May 2007 May-Aug. 1, 2007

Aug. 1, 2007

English Department

English teachers will inform students enrolled in their classes

English Department English Department

Develop Students’ Writing Skills and Writing Format

Mr. Guynn English Department

Present to faculty in meeting English teachers will inform students enrolled in their classes.

Mr. Guynn & English Department English Department

Time to obtain the TCAP Writing Assessment format and state grading rubric. $0

Mr. Guynn Mr. Guynn

English Department

118

Develop Students’ Writing Skills using the TCAP Writing Assessment Format

Present to faculty in meeting English teachers will inform students enrolled in their classes.

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Evaluation: D. Plan for Evaluating the Extent of Implementation of the School Improvement Plan:  Monthly meetings of the English Teachers and Mr. Guynn to review timelines and progress towards completion of identified goals E. Plan for Evaluating the Target Area Goals for Student Learning:  Analyze the 11th grade TCAP Writing assessment scores for an increase in proficiency levels  Analyze TVAAS diagnostics for writing looking for a gain F. Plan for Documenting Improvement in Instructional Effectiveness  Classroom observations to ensure that writing is being emphasized

119

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

5.13 Increasing gains in the upper Quintiles on all Gateway Tests Plan Target Area (Goal): There will be an increase in the gains in the upper Quintiles on the TVAAS on all Gateway Tests. Student Performance Standard: There will be an increase in the number of students showing gains in the upper Quintiles on the Gateway Tests. Belief Statement: Instructional decisions shall ensure that curriculum is relevant and assessment is a continuous process. Mission Statement: Our mission is to provide a safe, positive, and diverse educational environment in which students at all academic levels can attain the knowledge and skills necessary to become productive citizens.

School System’s 5-Year Goal: Improve learning through effective instructional and organizational design. State Board of Education Policy: All high school students will achieve worldclass standards. School Profile/Student Data: The 2006 TVAAS State data indicates that the students in the upper Quintiles are not making adequate gains while the students in the lower quintiles are proficient or making adequate gains: Section III, pages 57, 58, & 59. Expectations/Results/Objectives: Expectations include an increase of students making gains in the upper Quintiles on the Gateway Tests. Goal Evaluation: A comparison of the 2007 TVAAS State Report Card to the 2006 TVAAS Report Card will be conducted to determine if more students made adequate gains in the upper Quintile on all of the Gateway Tests. Next Steps: Check completion and progress of each action step. If goal is not met, new action steps may be considered. Long-Term Goal: Prepare students for life after high school—college, vocational school or work.

120

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

5.23 and 5.33 Increasing Gains in the Upper Quintiles on all Gateway Tests Action Step/Strategy Intervention

Timeline

Required Resources

Person(s) Responsible

Curriculum and Instruction

Communication

Professional Development

Action Step Assessment

May 1, 2007

Time to develop curriculum and benchmark tests. $0

Mr. Guynn

Improve the number of students making gains the upper Quintiles of the Gateway tests through expanding the Honors Algebra I and Advanced English II curriculum and creating benchmark tests.

Principal will inform faculty

Math and English teachers will be made aware of curriculum changes.

Track TVAAS score examining the upper Quintiles.

Science teachers will be made aware of curriculum changes.

Track TVAAS score examining the upper Quintiles.

Broaden the curriculum and raise the benchmarks for Honors Algebra I and Advanced English II 





 

Present to Mathematics and English Teachers Honors Algebra I will become a year long course. Develop curriculum for Honors Algebra I and Advanced English II by expanding the standards in each course. Develop benchmark tests. Implement policy

Aug. 1, 2007-May 2008

Math and English Departments

Math and English Departments Math and English Departments

May-Aug. 1, 2007

Present to parents and students during Freshman Orientation and registration.

Aug. 1, 2007

Implement a Honors Biology I Course  





Present to Science Teachers Develop Placement Criteria for Honors Biology I. Develop curriculum for Honors Biology I and develop benchmark tests. Implement policy

May 1, 2007 May-Aug. 1, 2007

Time to develop curriculum and benchmark tests. $0

Mr. Guynn

Science Teachers

May-Aug. 1, 2007

Science Teachers

Aug. 1, 2007

Science Teachers

Improve the number of students making gains the upper Quintiles of the Gateway tests through implementing a Honors Biology I curriculum and creating benchmark tests.

121

Principal will inform faculty Present to parents and students during Freshman Orientation and registration.

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Increasing Gains in the Upper Quintiles on all Gateway Tests continued…

Action Step/Strategy Intervention

Timeline

Required Resources

Person(s) Responsible

Curriculum and Instruction

Communication

Professional Development

Action Step Assessment

Continue and Implement the Accelerated Math Program in all Algebra I Classes.

Aug. 1, 2007May 2008

Time to install the Accelerated Math Program and train teachers.

Math Department

Increase students’ mathematical skills.

Teachers will be made knowledgeable of the Accelerated Math program.

Math Teachers will be trained to use the Accelerated Math Program.

Track TVAAS score examining the upper Quintiles.

Math and Science teachers

Continue Math and Science tutoring before and after school and on Saturdays.

Aug. 1, 2007May 2008

Up to 10 Extended Contracts $10,000

Implement the Plato Program as a tutorial or enrichment for Math, Science and English before and after school, on Saturday during the school year, and during Credit Recovery Program in the summer.

Aug. 1, 2007May 2008

Time to develop program using Plato and train teachers. $0

Analyze the TVAAS data for instructional purposes.

Improve the number of students making gains the upper Quintiles of the Algebra Gateway tests.

Math, Science, and English Departments

Up to 10 Extended Contracts $10,000

May-Aug1. 2007

Time to train teachers of the uses and importance of the TVAAS scores. $0

Mr. Guynn

Students will be informed once enrolled in Algebra I.

Improve the number of students making gains the upper Quintiles of the Algebra and Science Gateway tests.

Inform students through the school newsletter, website, and during registration.

Inform teacher of the tutoring available to students.

Track TVAAS score examining the upper Quintiles.

Improve the number of students making gains the upper Quintiles of the Algebra, English II, and Science Gateway tests.

Teachers will be made knowledgeable of the Plato tutorial and enrichment program.

Train teachers to use the Plato Program

Track TVAAS score examining the upper Quintiles.

Improve the number of students making gains the upper Quintiles of the Algebra, English II, and Science Gateway tests.

Teachers will be made knowledgeable of the uses and importance of the TVAAS scores.

Train teachers of the uses and importance of the TVAAS scores.

Track TVAAS score examining the upper Quintiles.

122

Inform students through the school newsletter, website, and during registration.

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Evaluation: A. Plan for Evaluating the Extent of Implementation of the School Improvement Plan: 

Monthly meetings of Science, Math, and English Departments and Mr. Guynn to review timelines and progress towards completion of identified goals

B. Plan for Evaluating the Target Area Goals for Student Learning: 

Analyze student performance to determine gains in math, English, and science in the upper quintile on the TVAAS.

C. Plan for Documenting Improvement in Instructional Effectiveness:  Track the upper quintile gains on the TVAAS for English, math, and science Gateway scores for the next two years.

123

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Section 6 Plan and Process Evaluation Chairman Lora Black, Library Media Specialist Faculty Members Angie Saunders, Section 1 Chair Jackie Perigen, Section 2 Chair Janey Marshall, Section 3 Chair Anita Gray, Section 4 Chair Penny Parsons, Section 5 Chair Chris Guynn, Principal Charlene Miller, Support Staff

124

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Introduction: Stewart County High School is committed to improvement through the TSIP process. The faculty and staff have worked to design a plan that serves the best interests of students. Great strides have been made to make the process continuous and inclusive. This section discusses the evaluation methods to be used in assuring the plan unfolds and evolves efficiently. Part one of this section includes a discussion of how the current plan will be evaluated. Attention is given to formative and summative assessment strategies, as well as evaluation of the planning process relating to communication, feedback, implementation, debriefing, monitoring and adjusting. Each goal includes the planned evaluation methods for the extent of implementation, assessing the target goal progress and improvements in instructional effectiveness followed by a discussion of each. Formative assessments include focus meetings, checklists, classroom observations, ACT scores throughout the year, surveys, ACTive Prep and Accelerated Math assessments, tutoring records, and TVAAS data. The projected assessment instruments, analysis procedures, time intervals, comparisons, and adjustment considerations are listed for evaluating the extent of implementation, instructional effectiveness and target goals for learning. Summative assessments include checklists, State report card, ACT Reports, More Effective Schools Survey, focus interviews and meetings, and executive summary compilation. The projected assessment instrument, analysis procedures, comparisons, adjustments, communication, and time intervals are included for extent of implementation, individual components of the action plan, target goals for student learning, and other evaluation methods. In the “Evaluating the SIP Process” section, attention is given to communication, feedback, implementation, debriefing, monitoring and adjusting. Each subsection includes a brief overview of strategies to be employed throughout the plan and the data analysis planned for evaluating the efficiency of such methods. Included at the end is an overview of the Executive Summary from the previous plan’s goals. This section also contains some of the rationale about where we were headed at the end of that cycle of school improvement. Some parts shed light on the accomplishments of the past and may give the reader background information pertinent to our current action plan.

125

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Plans for Formative Assessment (6.1) Improving ACT Composite Scores Plan for Evaluating the Extent of Implementation of the School Improvement Plan: Assessment Instrument: -Focus Meetings with Evaluation Worksheet -Checklist Analysis Procedures: Appropriate personnel will discuss progress toward completion of steps and complete Evaluation Worksheet. A master copy of the action plan will be on file in the principal’s office. Persons responsible will sign-off on the plan when tasks are completed and note the date of completion. Completion percentages will be calculated for this goal. Time Intervals: Focus meetings will occur monthly as appropriate, but not less than one time per nine weeks. Persons responsible for signing-off will do so as tasks are completed. Analysis will occur every nine weeks. Comparisons and Adjustments: Previous progress within this plan will be compared to current review. These will be presented to appropriate stakeholders in a timely manner. Completion percentages will be submitted to the principal. Needed adjustments to the schedule will be recommended to the principal. Plan for Evaluating Improvement in Instructional Effectiveness: Assessment Instrument: -ACT scores from October, December, and April test administrations - ACT Active Prep computer program feedback -Classroom vocabulary tests -Accelerated Math feedback Analysis Procedures: ACT scores from individual test administrations will be analyzed by grade, NCLB groups, and participation in TSIP ACT programs. ACT Active Prep data will be also be analyzed for progress within the realm of program usage. English classroom teachers will analyze vocabulary tests administered throughout the year. Math classroom teachers will be analyzed for progress with in the realm of the accelerated math program. 126

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Time Intervals: Analysis will occur after each ACT test administration when results are sent to schools. Analysis by classroom teachers will occur as tests are administered. Active Prep and Accelerated Math data will be analyzed as it is generated by the program. Comparisons and Adjustments: Comparisons by grade, NCLB groups, and participation in TSIP ACT programs will be made. As data is generated two, three and four-year comparisons will be made in all of the above mentioned areas. Plans for Evaluating Target Area Goals Assessment Instrument: - ACT test scores from the October, December, and April test administrations. - Senior ACT Reports Analysis Procedures: Scores will be analyzed by various factors such as grade, gender, NCLB subgroups, and participation in different elements of TSIP ACT programs such as ACTive Prep, Accelerated Math, ACT class, etc. Comparisons: Comparisons in subgroups, with PLAN data, and participation in TSIP ACT programs will be made. Adjustments: Information gained from this analysis will be used to determine if this goal has been met and if the changes made to the school program are feasible and effective enough to be continued. Communicating Goal Attainment: Information will be sent to teachers via e-mail and discussed in faculty meetings. School scores will be published in the newsletter, local paper, and on the web site. Time Intervals: Analysis will occur in November, January and May or as soon as data is available.

127

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Improving Growth in Middle and High Achievers on Gateway Biology, Algebra I, and English II Plan for Evaluating the Extent of Implementation of the School Improvement Plan: Assessment Instrument: -Focus Meetings with Evaluation Worksheet -Checklist Analysis Procedures: Appropriate personnel will discuss progress toward completion of steps and complete Evaluation Worksheet. A master copy of the action plan will be on file in the principal’s office. Persons responsible will sign-off on the plan when tasks are completed and note the date of completion. Completion percentages will be calculated for this goal. Time Intervals: Focus meetings will occur monthly as appropriate, but not less than one time per nine-weeks. Persons responsible for signing-off will do so as tasks are completed. Analysis will occur every nine weeks. Comparisons and Adjustments: Previous progress within this plan will be compared to current review. These will be presented to appropriate stakeholders in a timely manner. Completion percentages will be submitted to the principal. Needed adjustments to the schedule will be recommended to the principal. Plan for Documenting Improvement in Instructional Effectiveness: Assessment Instrument: - Checklist - After school tutoring records - Classroom observations -TVAAS Data Analysis Procedures: Teachers will complete a checklist of items/practices that have been encouraged and required during implementation. This will be an individual task followed by sharing with appropriate focus groups. Principal will conduct classroom observations. TVAAS data at the end of each year will be compared to previous years.

Time Intervals: Information will be analyzed every nine-weeks and more often as appropriate by classroom assignments.

128

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Comparisons and Adjustments: Comparisons will be made through teacher sharing. Adjustments will be made by individual teaching decisions and/or principal suggestions. Plan for Evaluating the Target Area Goals for Student Learning:

Assessment Instrument: -Checklist -TVAAS data for Gateway tests Analysis Procedures: Teachers will complete a checklist of items/practices that have been encouraged and required during implementation. This will be an individual task followed by sharing with appropriate focus groups. Teachers will use writing rubrics to examine classroom teaching. Principal will conduct classroom observations. Time Intervals: Each English teacher will analyze information every nineweeks and more often as appropriate by classroom assignments. Comparisons and Adjustments: Comparisons will be made through teacher sharing. Adjustments will be made by individual teaching decisions and/or principal suggestions.

129

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Improving Writing Plan for Evaluating the Extent of Implementation of the School Improvement Plan: Assessment Instrument: -Focus Meetings with Evaluation Worksheet -Checklist Analysis Procedures: Appropriate personnel will discuss progress toward completion of steps and complete Evaluation Worksheet. A master copy of the action plan will be on file in the principal’s office. Persons responsible will sign-off on the plan when tasks are completed and note the date of completion. Completion percentages will be calculated for this goal. Time Intervals: Focus meetings will occur monthly as appropriate, but not less than one time per nine-weeks. Persons responsible for signing-off will do so as tasks are completed. Analysis will occur every nine weeks. Comparisons and Adjustments: Previous progress within this plan will be compared to current review. These will be presented to appropriate stakeholders in a timely manner. Completion percentages will be submitted to the principal. Needed adjustments to the schedule will be recommended to the principal

130

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan

Plan for Documenting Improvement in Instructional Effectiveness: Assessment Instrument: -Checklist with focus questions -Focus groups -Writing Rubric with classroom records - Classroom observations Analysis Procedures: Teachers will complete a checklist of items/practices that have been encouraged and required during implementation. This will be an individual task followed by sharing with appropriate focus groups. Teachers will use writing rubrics to examine classroom teaching. Principal will conduct classroom observations. Time Intervals: Checklist will be completed every nine weeks. Sharing will occur at the end of each semester. Using the writing rubric in lessons will occur throughout the year. Principal observations will be periodically throughout the year. Comparisons and Adjustments: Comparisons will be made through teacher sharing. Adjustments will be made by individual teaching decisions.

Plan for Evaluating the Target Area Goals for Student Learning: Assessment Instrument: - Individual Classroom Records -11th Grade TCAP Writing Assessment - TVAAS (Tennessee Value-Added) Diagnostics for Writing - State Report Card

Analysis Procedures: Individual teachers will examine classroom records related to writing. Percentage of students scoring a 4 or better on the writing exam will be determined. TVAAS Data will be examined for positive gain in all quintiles. Time Intervals: This will occur as soon data is available from the State and as data is generated in classrooms throughout the year. Comparisons and Adjustments: Comparisons will be made in previous years’ scores and student growth in the classroom.

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Summative Assessment Plans (6.2) Plan for Evaluating Extent of Implementation Assessment Instrument: Checklists Analysis Procedure: A master copy of the action plan will be on file in the principal’s office. Persons responsible will sign-off on the plan when tasks are completed and note the date of completion. Completion percentages will be calculated for this goal. Comparisons: Completion percent and success of other school goals will be compared. Communicating Goal Attainment: The principal will announce completion celebrations in faculty meetings, school announcements, or teacher e-mails. Time Intervals: Persons responsible for signing-off will do so as tasks are completed. Analysis will begin April 1 and be reported by May 1.

Plan for Evaluating the Target Area Goals for Student Learning: Assessment Instrument: -State Report Card -State Report Card Writing Scores and ACT Scores -Tennessee Value Added Diagnostics -ACT Summative Reports Analysis Procedures: Progress and attainment of state goals will be studied. Value-added data will be compared to previous years. ACT Summative senior report will be studied for gains. Comparisons: Two and Three year comparisons will be made for each assessment tool. Subgroups comparisons will also be made. Adjustments: Goals and progress will be considered and any changes needed will be made with the approval of the TSIP committee and the principal.

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Communicating Goal Attainment: Principal will share during faculty meeting and in annual report to the BOE. Newspaper, newsletter, e-mail attachments, and school program venues will be used to inform stakeholders. Time Intervals: Principal report will occur at June BOE meeting. Information in the newsletter will be sent once each semester. Newspaper article when goal is attained (May). E-mail from the principal throughout the year. Inclusion in school programs as deemed appropriate throughout the year. Plan for Evaluating Individual Components of the SIP Assessment Instrument: -Focus Groups -Reports from each chair -More Effective Schools Survey

Analysis Procedures: Focused interviews will be conducted by the Section VI chair with each committee chair to ascertain the methods used to complete each section. Emphasis will be placed on successes, ideas for improvement, and efforts deemed inefficient. Information will be used by the TSIP chair to improve the process for the upcoming year. Data will be recorded systematically during the interviews, analyzed, and compiled in report form. Motifs, strengths and weaknesses will be noted.

Comparisons: Using the More Effective Schools Survey, three year comparisons will be made in various areas of the plan including the process, action plan, instructional strategies resulting from the plan, communication, and other aspects related to the plan. Strengths, weaknesses, and reoccurring themes will be compared from each section. Adjustments: Information gained from this analysis will be used to determine if goals have been met and if the changes made to the school program are feasible and effective enough to be continued. Communicating Goal Attainment: Information will be reported to appropriate stakeholders via the communication avenues reported in section 6.3. Time Intervals: The More Effective School Survey is administered by the BOE in December and results are usually returned by February. Analysis 133

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by the school will occur by March 1. Focused interviews will occur immediately after a goal is attained, but no later than April 1. Other Evaluation Methods of the Plan Assessment Instrument: Executive Summary Report Analysis Procedures: All evaluations will be considered as Executive Summary questions are answered. Comparisons: Numerous comparisons reported in this section will be included. Adjustments: Information gained from this analysis will be used to determine if goals have been met and if the changes made to the school program are feasible and effective enough to be continued. It will be used to give direction to upcoming plans. Communicating Goal Attainment: Information will be reported to appropriate stakeholders via the communication avenues reported in section 6.3. Time Intervals: Executive Summary will be filed with the State by May 15 each year it is required. Otherwise it will be completed annually by the end of May each year.

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Evaluating the SIP Process (6.3) Communication Plan Various means of communication to stakeholders have been planned throughout the coming year. E-mail-Teachers will receive e-mails regarding updates, progress, changes, and successes. Parents and community members providing e-mail addresses will also receive appropriate news via this avenue. Additional messages may be added to teacher progress reports also sent by e-mail as well as hardcopy form. Teachers will record the number of responses and report to TSIP team. Newsletter- The school will continue to send the quarterly newsletter to stakeholders. The mission will be added to the newsletter and articles pertaining to progress and success will be included. Each committee will submit at least one article about their section throughout the year. The number of times newsletter is published and the number of TSIP articles will be tracked. Local Newspaper- The local newspaper will also be used to communicate to a wider audience of stakeholders. Information regarding programs, meetings, feedback methods, deadlines etc. will be submitted to the paper. The number of articles published will be tracked. School Web Site- The school website will also include a link to the plan and various other links related to action steps and other important information. The number of responses will be tracked. Meetings- Faculty meetings, committee meetings, and community meetings will also be used to convey school improvement information. Minutes will be recorded and meeting times and dates will be tracked. Freshman Orientation- This session will be required for all incoming freshmen and their parents. Appropriate action plan information will be emphasized during these sessions. The number of parents attending will be tracked. School Announcements- Faculty, staff and students will gain information via the morning announcement system. Parents and community members can view announcements on school website. A record of TSIP announcements will be maintained. The chairperson for Section VI will compile a review of these methods to the principal and steering committee. Communication will also be evaluated through specific questions on the More Effective Schools Survey and other survey instruments. These will be included in the review. 135

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Gaining Feedback from Stakeholders Plan Successful monitoring and adjustment decisions will require feedback. The following is the plan for getting feedback from various sources and evaluating its effectiveness. Surveys- The school will conduct the More Effective Schools survey, a safety survey, and a health survey. All provide opportunities for students, teachers, support staff, parents, and community members to provide formal feedback about the plan and the perceived progress. The number of respondents will be tracked. Focus Meetings- During faculty sessions, committee meetings, and individual chair meetings, group discussion will provide a platform for feedback. The quality/quantity of impact information will be tracked. School Web Site- A feedback feature will be placed on the school’s webpage. The number of responses and topics reported will be tracked. E-mail- Parents will have the opportunity to provide feedback directly to teachers through the Thinkwave grading program. A school e-mail address will also be established for feedback purposes. The number of e-mail responses will be tracked.

The chairperson for Section VI will compile a review of these methods to the principal and steering committee. Feedback methods will also be evaluated through specific questions on the More Effective Schools Survey and other survey instruments. These will be included in the review.

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Implementation Plan The action plan provides details about implementation responsibilities and dates. The principal, the school improvement chairman, and the steering committee will provide reminders and be responsible for keeping the plan on track. Committee chairs are responsible for updating individual sections. Appropriate committees will meet every month or as appropriate to monitor and adjust steps as needed. Various methods will be used to evaluate implementation. Focused Interviews will be conducted by the Section VI chair with each committee chair to ascertain the methods used to complete each section. Emphasis will be placed on success, ideas to improve, and efforts deemed inefficient. Information will be used by the TSIP chair to improve the process for upcoming year. Data will be recorded systematically during the interview, analyzed and compiled. Motifs will be noted. Checklists will be used to determine the extent of implementation. A master copy of the action plan will be on file in the principal’s office. Persons responsible will sign-off on the plan when tasks are completed and note the date of completion. Completion percentages will be calculated. Monthly meetings as appropriate with responsible persons to review timelines and progress towards completion of identified steps will be conducted by the principal/TSIP chair. Data will be recorded during meetings. Review of professional development records will be conducted to track participation in training elements of the plan. Percentage of participation will be calculated.

The chairperson for Section VI will compile a review of these methods to the principal and steering committee. Implementation methods will also be evaluated through specific questions on the More Effective Schools Survey and other survey instruments. These will be included in the review.

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Debriefing Activities Plan Debriefing involves assessing the results of a mission, questioning formally and systematically to gain useful intelligence, and to direct participants in appropriate letting of valuable information about the process. The following debriefing activities are planned and their evaluation method is included for review. Focused Interviews/Meetings will be conducted by the Section VI chair with each committee chair, by the principal to the faculty, by committee chairs to appropriate stakeholders to explain the successes and failures of various parts of the plan, to ascertain the methods used to carry out the plan, and to direct those involved about the message or stand the school should be sending about the accomplishments or failures of the plan. Principal will conduct review and evaluation. Newsletter, Newspaper, Web Site, and E-mails will also contain debriefing information as the plan unfolds and nears completion. Principal will conduct review and evaluation.

Debriefing forms the image of the school by all stakeholders and is therefore a sensitive area in regard to public relations. With this in mind, the principal will evaluate the debriefing activities and direct the TSIP team in all areas of debriefing.

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Monitoring and Adjustments Plan Monitoring the plan will involve using the information from the formative and summative assessments, as well as informal observations, to make decisions about necessary adjustments. Plans for monitoring and adjusting are listed below along with a plan for evaluating the effectiveness of each strategy. Principal observations will be used to determine if the plan is on track. If not, he will make the necessary contact and directions for modifying the plan. He may extend the time, eliminate steps, add steps to the plan or supply that person with the resources/help needed to finish. He will rely on the steering committee and Section V for input on adjustments. TSIP Chair will check with committees and responsible individuals on a monthly basis to assure the plan is unfolding as written or receive recommendations for changes. TSIP chair will discuss needed adjustments with the principal and/or steering committee. Adjustments will be a group decision if possible. Formative assessments listed in Section V and Section VI (6.1) will be conducted. The information gained from these will be discussed by the steering committee. Adjustments will be a group decision. Summative assessments listed in Section V and Section VI (6.2) will be conducted. The information gained from these will be discussed by the steering committee. Adjustments in future planning may be based partially on this assessment. Minor Adjustments are inevitable as circumstances beyond the school’s control will no doubt be a part of any plan. However, strict adherence to the plan will be ensured by the principal to eliminate failure or delays in controllable matters. When possible, group decisions about adjustments will be made after discussion. However, minor adjustments can and should be made by committee chairs and the principal to keep the plan on track. Major Adjustments based on student performance data or other feedback that greatly changes responsibilities of teachers and staff will be made only after systematic procedures have been followed. This will include studying the change, discussing the impact on success, the affect on the goal timeline, and the affect on other school goals. Evaluation worksheet will be used to determine effectiveness of each of the above. The chairperson for Section VI will compile a review of these methods to the principal and steering committee. These will be included in the review.

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A comprehensive review of communication, feedback, implementation, debriefing, monitoring and adjustments will be filed with the principal and will be used by the steering committee to improve the process in future plans.

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Executive Summary from Previous Plan (Written in 2005-06/Implemented in 2006-07) As the plan evolves, the team has worked to merge ongoing efforts with new initiatives. Over the last few years, Stewart County High School chose to work on three main areas: improving graduation rate, improving writing proficiency, and decreasing failures through increased home/school communications. The following pages center on concluding documentation of the progress made in previous areas as well as information on new focal points. This includes a discussion of the extent of implementation for previous action plans and an examination of the impact on student achievement and organizational and instructional effectiveness. Several types of data were used to draw conclusions about each section. Among these were student test scores in various areas, evaluations of professional development programs, and student, parent, teacher and community member surveys. In addition, principal records were used in reporting our progress. In the area of improving graduation rate, we feel we have made changes that have significantly increased the percentage of students receiving a diploma in a four year period. In 2005 the graduation rate increased from the previous year and in 2006 the rate exceeded the state goal reaching 97.9%. Promotion rates increased and those failing one or more courses decreased. Efforts can be attributed to the school’s credit recovery program, the new homework policy, and efforts to increase communication between home and school. The school was able to research, organize and implement a successful “Credit Recovery” program. The PLATO software system was purchased and all teachers were trained. Extended contract employees were used to create before/after school and summer sessions to accommodate students. Student records were analyzed and targeted students were channeled into the recovery program. Another successful part of the action plan for this goal was the creation of a school wide homework policy. A committee of stakeholders met to study issues related to homework and attendance. A policy was drafted and approved by the faculty. Efforts were made school wide to implement the after school detention assigned to students failing to complete homework. A significant decrease in the number of students failing one or more classes was noted. Efforts in this area will continue outside the realm of the school’s improvement plan. In the improving writing category less progress was made in implementing the planned goals. However, TCAP writing scores did increase slightly, but still did not meet AYP for the three year average and received “below” rating on the report card. Of the three goals chosen for the action plan, writing seemed to be the least pressing at the time of planning. Time and minor setbacks impeded progress in this area 141

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and lead to complacency in working hard to improve this area. Clearly, the school’s progress here needs further attention and this continues to be a goal for the coming year. The last goal of decreasing failure through increased home school/school communication also continues to be a focus. While tremendous efforts in this area have been made, survey information still reveals a perceived weakness in this area. Successful implementation included increased use or a grade book program that made the reporting of grades and classroom information much easier, faster and convenient for parent and teacher. We feel this has made teachers more accessible to parents. The school newsletter provides another avenue for communication about important academic information. Freshman orientation provides a positive starting point for incoming freshmen. Parental awareness programs are providing other opportunities for parents and students to learn about services. All of these are still worthy goals. However, we have chosen to continue with some of the interventions put in place with this plan, regroup our efforts on writing and add additional steps to strengthen areas of weakness. Writing will continue to be a focus as well as increased home/school communications which will be included within other target areas. Other very important focal points emerging from student data are ACT concerns, especially in math, and growth in middle and high achievers in various Gateway subjects.

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School Improvement Plan Report - Stewart County Schools

Stewart County High School School Improvement Plan Stewart County High School PO Box 422 Dover, TN 37058 School Improvement Plan Original Document ...

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